foreign affairs

Why the EU would still benefit from Turkish accession

A recent vote in the European Parliament called for the suspension of EU accession talks with Turkey if it fully implements proposed constitutional changes that would increase President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s powers. Tahir Abbas argues that although both sides appear to be drifting apart, the EU would still have a lot to gain from Turkish membership.

Credit: MacPepper (CC BY-NC-SA […]

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    Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

The UK is generally recognised as a major player in international diplomacy, and is one of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council. But how might Brexit impact on its status at the UN, and will the country be a stronger or weaker force on the international stage after leaving the EU? Megan Dee and Karen E. […]

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    Vladimir Putin’s justification for Russian action in Crimea undermines his previous arguments over Syria, Libya and Iraq

Vladimir Putin’s justification for Russian action in Crimea undermines his previous arguments over Syria, Libya and Iraq

The European Union and the United States have heavily criticised Russia’s involvement in Crimea, following the referendum on the region’s secession from Ukraine on 16 March. Valerie Pacer writes that while Vladimir Putin has attempted to justify Russian intervention in Ukraine as compatible with international law, his statements completely contradict his previous arguments on western interventions in countries such as […]

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Despite David Cameron’s defeat on intervening in Syria, the UK Parliament actually has relatively weak war powers compared to legislatures in other democracies

Last night, in a highly unusual move, the House of Commons voted against the UK’s intervention with military force in the on-going conflict in Syria, the first time a British Prime Minister has lost a vote on military action since 1782. As part of Democratic Audit’s 2012 audit of UK democracy, Stuart Wilks-Heeg, Andrew Blick, and Stephen Crone considered the […]

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