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The Long Read: The Working Class Hasn’t Gone Away

Ron Johnston reviews three recent books that, in very different ways, explore the changing nature and politics of the working class in post-industrial societies.
The New Politics of Class: The Political Exclusion of the British Working Class. Geoffrey Evans and James Tilley. Oxford University Press. 2017.
The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality. Justin […]

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    An atlas with a positive message for a European people united in diversity

An atlas with a positive message for a European people united in diversity

Dimitris Ballas, Danny Dorling and Benjamin Hennig present a series of maps drawn from their new ‘Human Atlas of Europe’ that illustrate how life expectancy, wealth, and other key variables differ throughout the continent. Their maps highlight that the real divides across Europe lie within states rather than between them, but also suggest a positive message: that Europe remains a […]

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    Essay: Populism and the Limits of Neoliberalism by William Davies

Essay: Populism and the Limits of Neoliberalism by William Davies

Coinciding with the release of a revised edition of The Limits of Neoliberalism: Authority, Sovereignty and the Logic of Competition, William Davies argues that the recent surge in ‘populism’ must be understood in relation to the structures of political, cultural and moral economy, in particular the inability of neoliberalism to sustain the myth of a level playing field or […]

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    Bridging the gender gap: How to address low levels of political interest among women

Bridging the gender gap: How to address low levels of political interest among women

Survey evidence suggests that women in many European countries have a lower level of interest in politics on average than men do. Based on a recent study, Marta Fraile and Raul Gómez highlight that the degree of overall gender equality in a country can have a substantial impact on this ‘gender gap’ in political interest. However, this effect is […]

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    How electoral competition explains preference convergence and divergence in pre-electoral coalitions

How electoral competition explains preference convergence and divergence in pre-electoral coalitions

While most coalition governments form after the results of an election, some parties choose to announce their intention to form pre-electoral coalitions before a vote has been held. Based on a recent study, Zachary Greene and Matthias Haber explore why parties, which are usually in direct conflict with one another for electoral support, choose to engage in this kind of […]

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Gender quotas and the crisis of the mediocre man

A common criticism against gender quotas is that they are anathema to meritocratic principles. This research on Sweden by Tim Besley, Olle Folke, Torsten Persson and Johanna Rickne shows that the opposite can be true: Quotas actually increased the competence of politicians by leading to the displacement of mediocre men whether as candidates or leaders. The results may also […]

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Serbian presidential elections: The diaspora vote

Serbs will be called to the polls on 2 April 2017 (1 April in certain locations abroad) for the first round of this year’s presidential election, with a run-off foreseen for two weeks later. EUROPP has run an online survey to get an insight into the attitudes of a somewhat neglected section of the electorate: the Serbian diaspora. Our respondents […]

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    There is no evidence of a structural East-West divide in the EU

There is no evidence of a structural East-West divide in the EU

One of the most feared consequences of the EU’s eastern enlargement in the 2000s was that it would significantly diminish the decision-making capacity of the Union. As Dimiter Toshkov writes, several highly-publicised cases in which member states from Central and Eastern Europe have seemingly acted together to oppose proposals coming from Brussels have reinforced this pessimistic view. However, drawing […]

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    What an algorithm for expelling rebels and rewarding a party’s loyal MPs could look like

What an algorithm for expelling rebels and rewarding a party’s loyal MPs could look like

The use of modern technology in politics has become increasingly important in recent years, but what new opportunities could technology have for the political parties of the future? Taking inspiration from a statement by the Five Star Movement’s Beppe Grillo, Andrea Ceron outlines what an algorithm for expelling rebel MPs and rewarding loyal party members could look like. He […]

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    Fair or not? How credit rating agencies calculated their ratings during the Eurozone crisis

Fair or not? How credit rating agencies calculated their ratings during the Eurozone crisis

Credit rating agencies received a great deal of criticism during the Eurozone crisis, but what actually explains the changes that occur in a country’s credit rating? Drawing on new research, Periklis Boumparis, Costas Milas and Theodore Panagiotidis write that ratings agencies have responded differently to low-rated and high-rated Eurozone countries. Regulatory quality and competitiveness have a stronger impact for low […]

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    What if the angry white man is a woman? The gender gap in voting for the populist radical right

What if the angry white man is a woman? The gender gap in voting for the populist radical right

The archetypal populist radical right voter is usually thought of as being male, with female voters less likely to back these parties in elections. But many of these parties have nevertheless drawn on a substantial share of support from women. Outlining results from a recent study, Niels Spierings writes that although there is a gender gap in support for […]

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    Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Why the fear of Islamization is driving populist right support – and what to do about it

Mainstream parties need to begin addressing conservative whites’ anxieties about the demographic growth of Islam, or populists will continue to thrive, writes Eric Kaufmann. He argues that this demands a sustained programme for improving ‘demographic literacy’.

Geert Wilders may not have come first in the Dutch election, but he came second and forced his opponent, Mark Rutte, to tack closer to Wilders’ […]

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    Bursting the liberal bubble: Racism in the era of Brexit and Trump

Bursting the liberal bubble: Racism in the era of Brexit and Trump

Recent political developments have revived discussions on racism. But did we ever see the ‘end of racism’? Drawing on extensive research on the historical articulations of racism across Europe, Katy Sian explains how in the post-racial society, debates on anti-racism became invisible. This confusion allowed racism to grow unchecked.
Post-racialism and anti-racism
Between 2010 and 2013, when myself and colleagues at the […]

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    Why were Bosniaks treated more favourably than today’s Muslim refugees? On differing narratives of identity, religion and security

Why were Bosniaks treated more favourably than today’s Muslim refugees? On differing narratives of identity, religion and security

Today’s migration crisis has prompted comparisons with the recent past, with analyses highlighting the relatively successful integration of refugees from Bosnia in the 1990s. Catherine Baker reflects on why today’s migrants are not being given as warm a welcome and why even the welcome of Bosnian migrants was less warm than it has been remembered as. Although even before […]

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    Improving transport infrastructure is not a silver bullet for boosting growth

Improving transport infrastructure is not a silver bullet for boosting growth

Transport infrastructure investment is a cornerstone of growth-promoting strategies in the European Union. Yet, investment in new infrastructure is not always conducive to stronger economic performance. Drawing on a recent study, Riccardo Crescenzi, Marco Di Cataldo and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose write that in contexts marked by weak and inefficient governments and widespread corruption, different types of road investments often yield […]

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    The integration of Bosnian refugees: An encouraging story that provides lessons for the current migration crisis

The integration of Bosnian refugees: An encouraging story that provides lessons for the current migration crisis

The migration crisis has posed a number of challenges for European countries, but what lessons can be learned from previous experiences with large scale migration? Mikkel Barslund, Matthias Busse, Karolien Lenaerts, Lars Ludolph and Vilde Renman present evidence from a study of the integration of Bosnian refugees in Europe following the Balkan wars in the 1990s. They find that with […]

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Youth unemployment produces multiple scarring effects

It is clear that youth unemployment leads to many negative outcomes in terms of both material and mental wellbeing. Here, Ronald McQuaid summarises the multiple scarring effects of youth unemployment. Current high levels of youth unemployment will therefore be felt by society for decades, making effective policy responses incredibly important. 
Being unemployed when young leads to a higher likelihood of long-term ‘scarring’ in later […]

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How your sexual orientation affects your salary in the UK

Research concerning labour market discrimination based on sexual orientation has yielded varying outcomes so far. Studies were usually based on small on unrepresentative samples. Drawing on a large and previously unavailable dataset, Cevat Giray Aksoy, Christopher S. Carpenter and Jefferson Frank find that gay men earn less than straight ones and heterosexual women earn less than lesbians.

Credits: Stanley Dai, under […]

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    In defence of polls: A few high profile misses shouldn’t overshadow the many times pollsters called it right

In defence of polls: A few high profile misses shouldn’t overshadow the many times pollsters called it right

Polling companies were heavily criticised for failing to predict the results of the UK’s EU referendum and Donald Trump’s presidential election victory, but is this criticism fair? Abel Bojar draws on evidence from recent European elections to illustrate that opinion polls have a far better record of success than they’re given credit for.

Some professions are dealt a bad hand […]

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    Evidence from Norway: How public broadcasters influence voting behaviour

Evidence from Norway: How public broadcasters influence voting behaviour

Election campaigns frequently feature passionate debates over the impact of media coverage on decisions made by voters. Drawing on evidence from a new study, Rune J. Sørensen illustrates the impact the introduction of state television services had in Norway. His analysis suggests that in contrast to the United States, Norway’s state television service was linked with a boost in […]

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