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    The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The rights afforded to EU citizens living in the UK, and UK citizens living in the EU, is one of the key topics in the Brexit negotiations. But what do UK citizens think about these issues? Presenting evidence from a comprehensive survey of British views toward EU free movement rights, Liisa Talving and Sofia Vasilopoulou illustrate that although the […]

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    The EU tells a good story about itself, but its Asian partners may not be hearing it

The EU tells a good story about itself, but its Asian partners may not be hearing it

How do countries in Asia view the European Union? Drawing on a new study, Ben O’Loughlin, Natalia Chaban and Alister Miskimmon show that Asian elites see the EU as an important partner, but do not buy into the EU’s own narrative that Europe is a peaceful continent whose ability to overcome war offers a model for others.

The European Union […]

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    Economists used to think that it doesn’t matter whom you tax, but it does

Economists used to think that it doesn’t matter whom you tax, but it does

Workers typically have to pay taxes on their salary, while employers often add additional tax contributions for their employees. But does it matter how this division of taxation is distributed, or do workers and employers only care about net wages/costs after tax? Matthias Weber and Arthur Schram write that this division actually matters a great deal and can affect employees’ sense of well-being, willingness to work and […]

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    How EU member states have tried (and failed) to reach agreement on GMOs – and what it could mean for EU decision-making

How EU member states have tried (and failed) to reach agreement on GMOs – and what it could mean for EU decision-making

The regulation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is a controversial topic across the EU, and member states have repeatedly failed to reach decisions on the issue. This deadlock led in part to a proposal by the European Commission in February 2017 to fundamentally change the EU’s comitology procedure, with new rules being established for votes in the Council of […]

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    Why automated coding of party positions from manifestos may produce misleading conclusions in political research

Why automated coding of party positions from manifestos may produce misleading conclusions in political research

One of the more challenging tasks in political research is to produce reliable information on how political parties compare with one another on key issues like their approach to the economy or immigration. As Didier Ruedin writes, some researchers have sought to perform this task using automated methods that classify a party’s approach to an issue by scanning the […]

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    A not so universal suffrage: How Europe’s political elites have become educational elites

A not so universal suffrage: How Europe’s political elites have become educational elites

Education levels are often cited as a key factor in explaining differences in opinion between voters, but as Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille illustrate, many national parliaments have highly unrepresentative numbers of MPs with university degrees. They highlight that the number of MPs with degrees has increased substantially in western European countries over recent decades, and that the absence […]

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    The AfD succeeded in the German election by mobilising non-voters on the right

The AfD succeeded in the German election by mobilising non-voters on the right

Last Sunday’s German federal elections marked a significant break in Germany’s post-war history. For the first time since the immediate post-war period, a far-right party entered the Bundestag. With 13% of the seats, the populist anti-immigration party, Alternative for Germany (AfD), has become the third largest party in the German parliament. A key to the success of the AfD […]

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    Measuring the diversity of each party’s candidates in the German election

Measuring the diversity of each party’s candidates in the German election

Opinion polls suggest six parties will enter the Bundestag in Germany’s election on Sunday, two more than crossed the electoral threshold in the last elections in 2013. But what does this apparent fragmentation of the German party system mean for the diversity of candidates, particularly in terms of the fair representation of women and minority groups? Paul C. Bauer […]

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    The myth of the ‘boring election’: Populism and the 2017 German election

The myth of the ‘boring election’: Populism and the 2017 German election

The German federal elections scheduled for 24 September are widely expected to produce another victory for Angela Merkel’s CDU/CSU. As Fabian G. Neuner and Christopher Wratil highlight, however, Merkel’s dominant position in the polling has potentially masked some interesting developments during the campaign. Chief among these is that there has been a rise in populist sentiment in Germany, which […]

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    How support from other Member States affects influence in the Council of the European Union

How support from other Member States affects influence in the Council of the European Union

Numerous studies have attempted to measure the relative bargaining power that each EU member state has when making decisions in the Council of the European Union. But as Klaas Staal writes, the extent to which a state’s preferences match those of other member states can be just as important as its bargaining power. Drawing on data from a new […]

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    How do attitudes toward redistribution differ between Europe and the United States?

How do attitudes toward redistribution differ between Europe and the United States?

Europeans are often assumed to be more in favour of redistributive policies than citizens of the United States, but is this actually the case? New research by Jennifer Oser and Marc Hooghe finds that American public opinion is indeed less supportive of redistribution and social security than in Europe. However, a very substantial group of US citizens would still like […]

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    New parties, new movements: but how much say do party members get?

New parties, new movements: but how much say do party members get?

The Political Party Database Project has analysed the workings of 122 political parties in 19 parliamentary democracies. Remarkably, the vast majority share a common model of subscriber democracy: members join at a local level and enjoy a certain amount of say in the party’s direction. But in recent years a wave of new political movements, such as République en […]

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    Which subjects generate the best career outcomes for university students?

Which subjects generate the best career outcomes for university students?

Next Steps is a longitudinal study capturing information about young people’s educational trajectories, personal and family characteristics, and current occupational outcomes. As Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster explains, data reveals that Science, Technology, Maths and Engineering (STEM) graduates seem to have an advantage in gaining professional graduate employment and in enhanced mental wellbeing, but this isn’t reflected by increased incomes.

Credit: Kivensilence (CC0 licence)
One of the most important […]

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    Evidence from France and Italy: Do governments use EU funds to help buy votes in elections?

Evidence from France and Italy: Do governments use EU funds to help buy votes in elections?

Since their creation in 1975, European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) have been increasingly invested in local development projects in the EU. Drawing on figures from France and Italy, Lisa Dellmuth and Dominik Schraff illustrate that at least part of the ESIF is used to help buy political support, but that this appears to be more common in countries […]

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    The participation gap: Is citizen participation actually good for democracy?

The participation gap: Is citizen participation actually good for democracy?

The more people who participate in a democracy, the more democratic it becomes – or so de Tocqueville believed. But sceptics have challenged that assumption on the basis that not everyone has the skills to make informed political decisions. In his new book, Russell J Dalton argues that the problem lies with the participation gap: the better-off are more engaged […]

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    How Brits view Brexit: Indifferent on many aspects, but divided on others

How Brits view Brexit: Indifferent on many aspects, but divided on others

In a recent study, Sara Hobolt and Thomas Leeper examined public opinion on various dimensions of Brexit using an innovative technique for revealing preferences. Their results suggest that while the public is largely indifferent about many aspects of the negotiations, Leave and Remain voters are divided on several key issues. 

Measuring public preferences is commonly approached through survey questionnaires, in which […]

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    Evidence from Denmark: How EU immigration can benefit the welfare state

Evidence from Denmark: How EU immigration can benefit the welfare state

The problem of ‘welfare tourism’ has been raised by several politicians across Europe, with some arguing that immigration from other EU countries can create a burden for welfare systems. Dorte Sindbjerg Martinsen and Gabriel Pons Rotger present results from a recent study of the impact EU immigration has had on welfare spending in Denmark. They find that between 2002 […]

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    Why are younger voters less likely to back populist politics?

Why are younger voters less likely to back populist politics?

Populism is not just a symptom of older people’s nostalgia for traditional values, writes Henrik P Bang. It is a rejection of a global neoliberal creed that pits individuals against each other. The hard-won social capital and notions of fairness that older generations prize have been replaced by a race for success in which human relationships exist as much online as in […]

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Rethinking austerity? The IMF and social safeguards

In the last two months, the International Monetary Fund has published two major reports examining its approach to social safety nets and social protection. André Broome analyses whether the IMF is in the process of rethinking austerity and social protection priorities in loan programmes, and what this may mean for the future of IMF lending in Europe and beyond.

Christine […]

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    How business lobbyists thrive in the EU’s depoliticised media world

How business lobbyists thrive in the EU’s depoliticised media world

The EU policy process is often criticised for being distant from its citizens. As Iskander De Bruycker writes, part of this criticism is rooted in a lack of media coverage of EU legislative decision-making. Drawing on a recent study, he illustrates that the extent to which politicians in Brussels address citizens’ interests in the media over a particular piece […]

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