Latest Research

  • Permalink Gallery

    Uncovering the profound effects that pension and health care reforms have had in post-crisis Greece

Uncovering the profound effects that pension and health care reforms have had in post-crisis Greece

Pension and health care reforms introduced in Greece following the 2009 crisis, and the bail out agreements signed with the Troika of the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund, have attracted attention because of the significant cuts they entailed. Drawing on recent research, Marina Angelaki writes that focusing exclusively on retrenchment gives only part […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How Lübeck faded, while Hamburg survived trade disruption from the Dutch

How Lübeck faded, while Hamburg survived trade disruption from the Dutch

The German cities of Hamburg and Lübeck both had key roles in trade as members of the medieval Hanseatic League, but they have developed in a markedly different fashion since. While Hamburg grew to become an increasingly important economic centre, Lübeck experienced a slow but persistent decline after the 16th century. For Prateek Raj, the lesson is that dominant cities may become unattractive […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    People rely on their attitudes more than the source when judging the accuracy of news stories on Facebook

People rely on their attitudes more than the source when judging the accuracy of news stories on Facebook

The role of ‘fake news’ in shaping political behaviour has received extensive attention in recent years, with Facebook and other websites undertaking a number of measures to try and address the problem. Drawing on an experimental study during the 2017 German federal election campaign, Bernhard Clemm von Hohenberg illustrates that people rely far more on their pre-existing political attitudes […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How academics and service providers are working together to inform drug policy in Ireland

How academics and service providers are working together to inform drug policy in Ireland

Since 2015, the LSE’s International Drug Policy Unit has been working with local partners the Ana Liffey Drug Project to help foster a new era of progressive drug policies in Ireland. Tony Duffin outlines the scale of Ireland’s drug problem and how the project aims to help inform drug policy in the country from a solid evidence base.

In 2018 […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Labour market institutions still matter for workforce equality in the knowledge economy

Labour market institutions still matter for workforce equality in the knowledge economy

The latter decades of the 20th century saw the rise of the so called ‘knowledge economy’ in Europe, with service sectors such as finance and telecommunications coming to dominate national economies. But these changes also occurred alongside a growth in income inequality across advanced democracies. As David Hope and Angelo Martelli highlight, many observers have assumed that the transition […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The problem of feedback loops: Do opinion polls reinforce popular views?

The problem of feedback loops: Do opinion polls reinforce popular views?

Opinion polls are a vital tool for understanding what the public wants from its political representatives, but is there a danger that poll results can influence the views of citizens? As Sveinung Arnesen writes, one of the potential issues with polling is that people may change their attitudes after learning what others think. A disconcerting possibility is that opinion […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    “Context matters”: A framework to help connect knowledge with policy in government institutions

“Context matters”: A framework to help connect knowledge with policy in government institutions

Researchers trying to use the knowledge they’ve produced to inform public policy are often warned of the importance of context to policy decisions. But what exactly does “context” mean? Leandro Echt introduces a new framework that can help researchers develop a better understanding of the various different contexts operating within institutions, and critically identify those points where policy change is most […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Europe’s ageing societies require immigration to survive – and that means anti-immigration politics is here to stay

Opposition to immigration is typically cited as one of the key factors in the UK’s decision to leave the European Union and the growth of new populist parties across Europe. Nate Breznau suggests there is a direct link between increasing levels of immigration and support for anti-immigration parties. And with many European countries requiring immigration to compensate for ageing […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The question of citizenship in the Brexit divorce: UK and EU citizens’ rights compared

The rights afforded to EU citizens living in the UK, and UK citizens living in the EU, is one of the key topics in the Brexit negotiations. But what do UK citizens think about these issues? Presenting evidence from a comprehensive survey of British views toward EU free movement rights, Liisa Talving and Sofia Vasilopoulou illustrate that although the […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The EU tells a good story about itself, but its Asian partners may not be hearing it

The EU tells a good story about itself, but its Asian partners may not be hearing it

How do countries in Asia view the European Union? Drawing on a new study, Ben O’Loughlin, Natalia Chaban and Alister Miskimmon show that Asian elites see the EU as an important partner, but do not buy into the EU’s own narrative that Europe is a peaceful continent whose ability to overcome war offers a model for others.

The European Union […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Economists used to think that it doesn’t matter whom you tax, but it does

Economists used to think that it doesn’t matter whom you tax, but it does

Workers typically have to pay taxes on their salary, while employers often add additional tax contributions for their employees. But does it matter how this division of taxation is distributed, or do workers and employers only care about net wages/costs after tax? Matthias Weber and Arthur Schram write that this division actually matters a great deal and can affect employees’ sense of well-being, willingness to work and […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How EU member states have tried (and failed) to reach agreement on GMOs – and what it could mean for EU decision-making

How EU member states have tried (and failed) to reach agreement on GMOs – and what it could mean for EU decision-making

The regulation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is a controversial topic across the EU, and member states have repeatedly failed to reach decisions on the issue. This deadlock led in part to a proposal by the European Commission in February 2017 to fundamentally change the EU’s comitology procedure, with new rules being established for votes in the Council of […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Why automated coding of party positions from manifestos may produce misleading conclusions in political research

Why automated coding of party positions from manifestos may produce misleading conclusions in political research

One of the more challenging tasks in political research is to produce reliable information on how political parties compare with one another on key issues like their approach to the economy or immigration. As Didier Ruedin writes, some researchers have sought to perform this task using automated methods that classify a party’s approach to an issue by scanning the […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    A not so universal suffrage: How Europe’s political elites have become educational elites

A not so universal suffrage: How Europe’s political elites have become educational elites

Education levels are often cited as a key factor in explaining differences in opinion between voters, but as Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille illustrate, many national parliaments have highly unrepresentative numbers of MPs with university degrees. They highlight that the number of MPs with degrees has increased substantially in western European countries over recent decades, and that the absence […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The AfD succeeded in the German election by mobilising non-voters on the right

The AfD succeeded in the German election by mobilising non-voters on the right

Last Sunday’s German federal elections marked a significant break in Germany’s post-war history. For the first time since the immediate post-war period, a far-right party entered the Bundestag. With 13% of the seats, the populist anti-immigration party, Alternative for Germany (AfD), has become the third largest party in the German parliament. A key to the success of the AfD […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Measuring the diversity of each party’s candidates in the German election

Measuring the diversity of each party’s candidates in the German election

Opinion polls suggest six parties will enter the Bundestag in Germany’s election on Sunday, two more than crossed the electoral threshold in the last elections in 2013. But what does this apparent fragmentation of the German party system mean for the diversity of candidates, particularly in terms of the fair representation of women and minority groups? Paul C. Bauer […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The myth of the ‘boring election’: Populism and the 2017 German election

The myth of the ‘boring election’: Populism and the 2017 German election

The German federal elections scheduled for 24 September are widely expected to produce another victory for Angela Merkel’s CDU/CSU. As Fabian G. Neuner and Christopher Wratil highlight, however, Merkel’s dominant position in the polling has potentially masked some interesting developments during the campaign. Chief among these is that there has been a rise in populist sentiment in Germany, which […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How support from other Member States affects influence in the Council of the European Union

How support from other Member States affects influence in the Council of the European Union

Numerous studies have attempted to measure the relative bargaining power that each EU member state has when making decisions in the Council of the European Union. But as Klaas Staal writes, the extent to which a state’s preferences match those of other member states can be just as important as its bargaining power. Drawing on data from a new […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How do attitudes toward redistribution differ between Europe and the United States?

How do attitudes toward redistribution differ between Europe and the United States?

Europeans are often assumed to be more in favour of redistributive policies than citizens of the United States, but is this actually the case? New research by Jennifer Oser and Marc Hooghe finds that American public opinion is indeed less supportive of redistribution and social security than in Europe. However, a very substantial group of US citizens would still like […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    New parties, new movements: but how much say do party members get?

New parties, new movements: but how much say do party members get?

The Political Party Database Project has analysed the workings of 122 political parties in 19 parliamentary democracies. Remarkably, the vast majority share a common model of subscriber democracy: members join at a local level and enjoy a certain amount of say in the party’s direction. But in recent years a wave of new political movements, such as République en […]

Print Friendly
Share