LSE Comment

This section showcases articles from LSE academics, students and alumni which have appeared on EUROPP – European Politics and Policy.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Could Belgrade’s local elections signal a power shift in Serbia?

Could Belgrade’s local elections signal a power shift in Serbia?

On 4 March, local elections will be held in Belgrade. Although the importance of the contest has been downplayed by the ruling Serbian Progressive Party (SNS), led by Aleksandar Vučić, the country’s opposition is hopeful of dealing the SNS a rare electoral setback. Marko Čeperković highlights that with parliamentary elections on the horizon, the vote in Belgrade could go […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How will Italy’s election affect its relationship with the EU?

How will Italy’s election affect its relationship with the EU?

Ahead of the Italian elections on 4 March, opinion polls suggest an increasingly fragmented political scenario, with a hung parliament and likely difficulties in having a parliamentary majority in support of a new government. But what will the vote mean for Italy’s relations with the EU? Lorenzo Codogno discusses the three most important themes in the Italy-EU relationship.

Credit: Giorgio Montersino […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Orbán: Europe’s New Strongman by Paul Lendvai

Book Review: Orbán: Europe’s New Strongman by Paul Lendvai

In Orbán: Europe’s New Strongman, Paul Lendvai argues that following a ‘lightning-speed assault’ on its democratic features, Hungary can now be better characterised as an authoritarian system under the rule of Viktor Orbán. Lendvai succeeds in tracing Hungary’s rapid slide towards authoritarianism in this excellent book, writes Paul Caruana-Galizia.
Orbán: Europe’s New Strongman. Paul Lendvai. Hurst Publishers. 2017.
Find this book: 
From fascism to Stalinism to communism, it looked like Hungary had […]

Print Friendly
Share
February 18th, 2018|Book Reviews, featured, LSE Comment, Paul Caruana-Galizia|Comments Off on Book Review: Orbán: Europe’s New Strongman by Paul Lendvai|
  • Permalink Gallery

    It’s time for the EU to adapt its conflict prevention policy to climate change

It’s time for the EU to adapt its conflict prevention policy to climate change

In 2017, UN Secretary General António Guterres called on the international community to rethink its approach to peace and security, noting that more time and resources are spent responding to crises than preventing them. Constantin Gouvy highlights the role of climate change in exacerbating the factors that fuel conflicts, from competition for resources and sectarian divides to poor governance.

Credit: Max Pixel (CC0 Public Domain)
Over the […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    When Europe is fashionable: The strange paradox of the Italian elections

When Europe is fashionable: The strange paradox of the Italian elections

The upcoming Italian election will be closely watched in other EU states. Giulia Pastorella writes that while on the face of it most parties running in the election are markedly pro-European, there is an undercurrent of Euroscepticism in the campaign which should prompt concern for those in favour of further European integration.

The European Council of Foreign Relations ranked Italy […]

Print Friendly
Share

Britain’s best Brexit bet is the Jersey option

The UK government spent last year urging the EU27 to start discussing their post-Brexit trading relationship. But now that the negotiations are finally due to move on to trade, ministers cannot decide what they want. Philippe Legrain argues that the Jersey option would give Britain a degree of regulatory freedom while minimising the disruption to trade with the EU.
The […]

Print Friendly
Share

How to tackle populism: Macron vs Kurz

This time last year, things did not look pretty for the EU, writes Michael Cottakis. Marine Le Pen topped the polls in France spreading fears over Frexit, Geert Wilders had crept clear of his challengers in the Netherlands, and EU officials glanced worriedly at an Austria dealing with its own far-right challenge. In all three cases, the populist challenge fell […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The beginning of the end for political stability? How the new generation of CDU and SPD members are seeking to reshape German politics

The beginning of the end for political stability? How the new generation of CDU and SPD members are seeking to reshape German politics

An agreement has been reached on the creation of a new grand coalition in Germany, but the deal could potentially be rejected by members of the German Social Democrats (SPD), with results of the membership vote due on 4 March. Julian Göpffarth argues that even if the coalition deal is approved and Angela Merkel remains chancellor, the era of […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Most observers agree that the chances of Turkey joining the EU are becoming increasingly remote. But even in early 2016, before the country’s failed coup attempt and the 2017 constitutional referendum, Turkish accession was looking a distant prospect. Yet as James Ker-Lindsay writes, this did not prevent Vote Leave from claiming towards the end of the UK’s EU referendum campaign that Turkey was poised to […]

Print Friendly
Share

Targeted propaganda and the Italian election campaign

During the Brexit Referendum and subsequent elections in the US, Britain, France, Germany and Austria, questions have been raised about the role of social media, and in particular foreign involvement, misinformation, and lack of transparency. As Italy prepares for elections on 4 March, Damian Tambini examines the background and asks what academic and civil society election observers should be […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How academics and service providers are working together to inform drug policy in Ireland

How academics and service providers are working together to inform drug policy in Ireland

Since 2015, the LSE’s International Drug Policy Unit has been working with local partners the Ana Liffey Drug Project to help foster a new era of progressive drug policies in Ireland. Tony Duffin outlines the scale of Ireland’s drug problem and how the project aims to help inform drug policy in the country from a solid evidence base.

In 2018 […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Donald Trump’s rhetoric has only highlighted the already growing rift between the EU and the US

Donald Trump’s rhetoric has only highlighted the already growing rift between the EU and the US

On the first anniversary of Donald Trump’s presidency, the future of the transatlantic relationship is as uncertain as ever. According to Lisa ten Brinke, the rift between the EU and the US began before Trump entered the Oval Office, and this is not likely to change any time soon. 

Just over one year ago, the world watched as Donald Trump […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

Book Review: The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World by Maya Jasanoff

In The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World, Maya Jasanoff argues that novelist Joseph Conrad’s life and works evidence a global world in the making at the end of the nineteenth century. Padraic X. Scanlan praises this as an impressive experiment in the genre, but asks: without fully contending with the racist imaginary that shaped much of his work, can we so seamlessly embrace Conrad as […]

Print Friendly
Share

The Brexit-sized hole in the future EU budget

The UK is a net contributor to the EU budget. Following Brexit, the loss of UK contributions will therefore likely require either a reduction in overall spending, or for the remaining member states to pay more into the budget. Iain Begg explains the impact this shortfall might have as the EU seeks to negotiate its next Multi-annual Financial Framework.

Have you ever wondered […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    GroKo for Germany? How the prospect of a new grand coalition is dividing the country and the SPD

GroKo for Germany? How the prospect of a new grand coalition is dividing the country and the SPD

On 21 January, members of the German Social Democrats (SPD) will vote on whether to move to the next stage of talks over the formation of a grand coalition between the SPD and Angela Merkel’s CDU/CSU. Julian Göpffarth writes that much like the country as a whole, the SPD faces a choice between pragmatic politics and a rebellious yearning […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    ‘We don’t exist to them, do we?’: Why working-class people voted for Brexit

‘We don’t exist to them, do we?’: Why working-class people voted for Brexit

Working-class people were more likely to vote for Brexit. However, Lisa Mckenzie takes issue with the notion that these people were simply ‘turkeys voting for Christmas’. They saw Brexit, with all the uncertainties it would bring, as an alternative to the status quo. Deindustrialisation and austerity have taken a heavy toll on working-class communities – one which the middle-class often fails to grasp.

Credit: David […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Labour market institutions still matter for workforce equality in the knowledge economy

Labour market institutions still matter for workforce equality in the knowledge economy

The latter decades of the 20th century saw the rise of the so called ‘knowledge economy’ in Europe, with service sectors such as finance and telecommunications coming to dominate national economies. But these changes also occurred alongside a growth in income inequality across advanced democracies. As David Hope and Angelo Martelli highlight, many observers have assumed that the transition […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The European Parliament is more representative of European citizens than we give it credit for

The European Parliament is more representative of European citizens than we give it credit for

Does the European Parliament adequately represent the views of European citizens? Drawing on a recent study, Miriam Sorace illustrates that while the Parliament is often criticised for being too distant from its voters, it is far more representative of the views of voters than commonly thought. Nevertheless, a lack of information about European election campaigns, as well as a […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The UK is still educating different classes for different functions in society

The UK is still educating different classes for different functions in society

The working classes still get less of everything in education, including respect, argues Diane Reay. She suggests that in order to move towards a fairer educational system, the UK needs to implement a National Education Service that provides the same standards and level of resources to all children, regardless of class and ethnic background.

Historically, the English educational system has educated […]

Print Friendly
Share

Dialogue is the only answer to the Catalan crisis

The elections in Catalonia on 21 December produced a broadly similar level of support for parties in favour of independence as the previous elections in 2015. James Irving argues that although Catalonia appears to have found itself back where it started, there is plenty of room for lessons to be learned from the last few months, and the only […]

Print Friendly
Share