LSE Comment

This section showcases articles from LSE academics, students and alumni which have appeared on EUROPP – European Politics and Policy.

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    Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The UK government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. Thomas Sampson argues that the proposal is incomplete and leaves five key questions about the UK’s position unanswered.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition agreement […]

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    How Brits view Brexit: Indifferent on many aspects, but divided on others

How Brits view Brexit: Indifferent on many aspects, but divided on others

In a recent study, Sara Hobolt and Thomas Leeper examined public opinion on various dimensions of Brexit using an innovative technique for revealing preferences. Their results suggest that while the public is largely indifferent about many aspects of the negotiations, Leave and Remain voters are divided on several key issues. 

Measuring public preferences is commonly approached through survey questionnaires, in which […]

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    German election campaign series: SPD – “Time for more justice”

German election campaign series: SPD – “Time for more justice”

German voters will go to the polls on 24 September for federal elections. But what do the country’s parties want? What are the possible coalitions? And who has the best campaign strategy to sell their proposals to the electorate? In the second of a series of articles analysing each of the main parties’ campaign pledges, Julian Göpffarth assesses the programme of […]

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Why the EU would still benefit from Turkish accession

A recent vote in the European Parliament called for the suspension of EU accession talks with Turkey if it fully implements proposed constitutional changes that would increase President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s powers. Tahir Abbas argues that although both sides appear to be drifting apart, the EU would still have a lot to gain from Turkish membership.

Credit: MacPepper (CC BY-NC-SA […]

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    Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

Post-Brexit diplomacy: Can the UK hope to exert leverage at the UN without recourse to the EU?

The UK is generally recognised as a major player in international diplomacy, and is one of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council. But how might Brexit impact on its status at the UN, and will the country be a stronger or weaker force on the international stage after leaving the EU? Megan Dee and Karen E. […]

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Is the UK economy starting to falter?

All of a sudden Britain has become the slowest growing of the major western economies, and there are increasing concerns about its medium-term outlook. Iain Begg writes that with both government and opposition fixated on what kind of Brexit to favour, there is a growing risk that fundamental and necessary measures to underpin the economy will be neglected.

Until well after the turn […]

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    Turkey-EU accession talks: Sadly, the status quo is the best we have

Turkey-EU accession talks: Sadly, the status quo is the best we have

In a non-binding vote on 6 July, the European Parliament called for the suspension of EU accession talks with Turkey if it fully implements proposed constitutional changes that would increase President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s powers. Dimitar Bechev states that the reality is Turkey’s membership talks have already failed, but the EU’s best strategy is nevertheless to preserve the status […]

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    Catalonia and Spain: Will the referendum on independence go ahead?

Catalonia and Spain: Will the referendum on independence go ahead?

The Catalan government has indicated it still intends to hold a referendum on independence on 1 October despite the Spanish government’s insistence that the vote will not take place. Sebastian Balfour writes that nothing could be more unpredictable than the outcome of the current impasse, as an almost unstoppable force, the Catalan movement for independence, is about to clash […]

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A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were, Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

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    Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in EU […]

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    CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

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Judicial reforms in Poland – getting the public on board

On 24 July, Poland’s President, Andrzej Duda, indicated that he would veto several judicial reforms that had generated protests within the country. Anna Matczak argues that the views of the public toward judicial reform have become obscured. She highlights that there is a deep level of mistrust among Polish citizens toward the criminal justice system and that the recent controversy should be […]

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    All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

EU residency rights have gendered consequences, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’ and […]

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    German election campaign series: CDU/CSU – “For a Germany in which we live well and enjoy living”

German election campaign series: CDU/CSU – “For a Germany in which we live well and enjoy living”

German voters will go to the polls on 24 September for federal elections. But what do the country’s parties want? What are the possible coalitions? And who has the best campaign strategy to sell their proposals to the electorate? In the first of a series of articles analysing each of the main parties’ campaign pledges, Julian Göpffarth assesses the programme […]

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    Has the Western Balkans 6 process become a ‘surrogate for the real thing’?

Has the Western Balkans 6 process become a ‘surrogate for the real thing’?

On 12 July, EU leaders met with Prime Ministers of Balkan countries in the Italian city of Trieste. Tena Prelec gives a first-hand account, writing that the ‘Western Balkans 6’ (WB6) initiative – or ‘Berlin Process’ – has had the laudable effect of keeping some attention on the Western Balkans in years when the EU enlargement process was paused, […]

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    How structural reforms and European integration can help aid the convergence of Western Balkan states with the EU

How structural reforms and European integration can help aid the convergence of Western Balkan states with the EU

Six states in the Western Balkans – Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia – have aspirations to join the European Union. These six states have implemented policies aimed at developing convergence with the EU in terms of their political systems, their economies, and their compatibility with EU law (the acquis communautaire). Fatmir Besimi presents a comprehensive […]

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    How the EU’s partnership with Myanmar is furthering its goals in Southeast Asia

How the EU’s partnership with Myanmar is furthering its goals in Southeast Asia

In 2016, the EU agreed a ‘Special Partnership for Democracy, Peace and Prosperity’ with Myanmar. Ludovica Marchi assesses how the EU’s engagement with Myanmar has furthered its goals in Southeast Asia. The partnership advanced several EU ambitions, boosting the EU’s presence in the region, bolstering its relations with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and enhancing the EU’s role […]

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    Youth politics: Russia’s protests reflect a Europe-wide rebellion against the status quo

Youth politics: Russia’s protests reflect a Europe-wide rebellion against the status quo

In Russia, Aleksei Navalny initiated a new nationwide wave of protests that confirmed the Kremlin faces significant legitimacy issues, especially among the younger generation. Tomila Lankina argues that this trend is not confined to Russia, and can indeed be noticed across the continent – from Macron’s victory in France to young people taking a more active role in politics […]

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Reflecting on how to run €MU more effectively

The European Commission published a reflection paper at the end of May on deepening economic and monetary union. Iain Begg assesses the strategy for reform put forward, writing that the paper is relatively guarded and does not convey an explicit trajectory for the next stages of development of EMU governance. He argues that unless and until there is a […]

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    Italy versus Spain: Two measures for solving the same banking problem

Italy versus Spain: Two measures for solving the same banking problem

On 24 June, the Italian government announced that it would intervene in two banks, Veneto Banca and Banca Popolare di Vicenza. Both banks were to be wound down with each bank’s good assets being sold to the Intesa Sanpaolo banking group. Mara Monti compares the affair with the case of Spain’s Banco Popular, which was saved from collapse just a […]

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