Brexit

  • Permalink Gallery

    Hard cheese? Dairy products will be more expensive in the UK after Brexit

Hard cheese? Dairy products will be more expensive in the UK after Brexit

Britain imports a lot of dairy produce, nearly all of it from the EU, while at home, the industry employs a large number of workers from the rest of the EU. Jan Bakker and Nikhil Datta predict that dairy will become more expensive after Brexit. Even if Britons switch to UK-produced dairy, it will take some years for domestic herds […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    A paler shade of grey? It is hard to see how any in-between version of Brexit can prevail

A paler shade of grey? It is hard to see how any in-between version of Brexit can prevail

A simple metaphor captures the dilemmas around Brexit: some want white, others want black. To state the blindingly obvious, the two are mutually exclusive. In this post, Iain Begg considers the two logically coherent positions on EU membership. It is hard to see how any in-between solution – any shade of grey – can prevail. 

Leaving the EU means, well, Brexit […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Lessons from South Korea: What would a hard Brexit mean for British manufacturers?

Lessons from South Korea: What would a hard Brexit mean for British manufacturers?

The UK government has proposed maintaining a ‘common rulebook’ with the European Union following Brexit, which would in principle prevent non-tariff trade barriers from developing. But if this proposal fails and the UK leaves without a deal, how would British manufacturers be affected? Robert Basedow draws lessons from the South Korean car industry, noting that manufacturers based outside of […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Brexit’s epicentre: London’s financial services sector and its place in the UK economy

Brexit’s epicentre: London’s financial services sector and its place in the UK economy

Developments in London’s financial district help us understand the precise form that Brexit will take, argues Sarah Hall. She explains why London is distinct to the rest of the UK and writes that, as companies threaten to move to other European cities in anticipation of a ‘no deal’, the government’s decision making is still not reflecting the City’s strategic […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Sustaining the rule of law in the Irish border region will depend on institutional co-operation

Sustaining the rule of law in the Irish border region will depend on institutional co-operation

The British government’s White Paper has been portrayed as an important step towards avoiding a ‘hard’ border in Ireland. However, as Jan van Zyl Smit writes, sustaining the rule of law in the Irish border region will depend on institutional co-operation.

By proposing a free trade area in goods with the EU, the UK Government White Paper published on Thursday 12 July 2018 has taken […]

Print Friendly
Share

Brexit: Time for a moratorium?

The UK is set to leave the EU in March next year, but many of the key issues remain unresolved and there is now perceived to be a very real prospect of the country leaving without a deal in place. For Helmut K Anheier, the answer is not a second referendum given another vote would do little to resolve the […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Brexit’s institutional irony: How the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

Brexit’s institutional irony: How the EU has successfully outflanked the UK

The EU has been popularly derided as ineffectual, but it has shown remarkable co-ordination and unity in its Brexit negotiations with the UK. Dermot Hodson and John Peterson explain how Michel Barnier has outflanked the UK, with both the Commission and the Council presenting a united front.

Before British voters went to the polls in June 2016, the institutions of the European Union […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The devil is in the detail: Why multinationals favour the customs union

The devil is in the detail: Why multinationals favour the customs union

In a customs union, goods cross borders seamlessly, but in a free trade agreement, border checks are needed to ensure conformity with rules of origin. Paola Conconi explains why a customs union is key for multinationals wishing to stay in the UK after Brexit.

Some members of Theresa May’s cabinet are pushing for a ‘soft’ Brexit, which would allow the UK to remain […]

Print Friendly
Share

What bothers European media most about Brexit?

How does the rest of Europe see Brexit? In this extract from a Reuters Institute report, Alexandra Borchardt, Diego Bironzo and Felix M Simon examine what preoccupies the UK’s neighbours. They find trade and the economy have been central to the coverage, with Irish media focusing on the Northern Irish border issue, but there has been relatively little interest in […]

Print Friendly
Share

Made in the UK: Brexit and manufacturing revisited

What impact will Brexit have on UK manufacturing? As Bob Hancké points out, the domestic economic effects of Brexit are dynamic, not static. While some industries will be devastated by Brexit, resources may switch to other areas which, in theory, could thrive. But for this to happen, the UK needs to revamp its industrial supply chains, which are dependent on close links […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe edited by Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger

Book Review: Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe edited by Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger

In Brexit and Beyond: Rethinking the Futures of Europe, editors Benjamin Martill and Uta Staiger bring together contributors to consider the possible implications of Brexit for the futures of Europe and the European Union. Available to download here, the book’s interdisciplinary approach makes clear the difficulties of predicting the potential outcomes of an unfolding process while nonetheless outlining a number of different scenarios and possibilities in […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Refusing to dance to a Brexit tune: How the EU has misinterpreted Britain’s vote to leave

Refusing to dance to a Brexit tune: How the EU has misinterpreted Britain’s vote to leave

Britain has made numerous mistakes over Brexit, but the European Union’s record also needs to be analysed. Tim Oliver addresses some of the things the EU has been accused of getting wrong about Brexit. In this post, he looks at how the EU has misinterpreted Brexit.

Brexit has been a learning experience for all involved. British and EU negotiators have found […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How to have a serious referendum on Brexit and avoid a rerun of the original

How to have a serious referendum on Brexit and avoid a rerun of the original

A number of things were wrong with the 2016 referendum, including the  disenfranchisement of key stakeholders and the extent of misinformation by both sides. Given that referendums should be informed exercises in democratic decision-making, Bruce Ackerman and Sir Julian Le Grand explain what a referendum on the deal should look like.

We are moving to a world where the decisions […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Mutually assured destruction? Understanding the UK and Ireland’s standoff over the Northern Irish border

Mutually assured destruction? Understanding the UK and Ireland’s standoff over the Northern Irish border

Time is rapidly running out in the Brexit negotiations and there is still no agreement in sight on the issue of the Irish border. Gavin Barrett explains that despite the ultimatums emanating from each side, a no-deal Brexit would be catastrophic for both the UK and Ireland.

Tony Blair once famously compared then British Prime Minister David Cameron’s (badly miscalculated) […]

Print Friendly
Share

How Brexit will affect Germany’s role in the EU

Given the size and influence of the UK, Brexit is expected to have a significant impact on the political dynamics within the EU’s institutions. Leopold Traugott assesses how Britain’s departure is likely to affect Germany’s role in the EU. He notes that Germany will be obliged to do more to fill the gap left by the UK, while the […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Why did people really vote to Leave or Remain? Noah Carl examines four different polls, and finds that immigration and sovereignty headed Leavers’ reasons – contrary to suggestions that the vote was intended to ‘teach politicians a lesson’. Leavers also proved better at characterising Remainers’ reasons than vice versa – something which may be linked to progressives’ greater tendency to disengage from […]

Print Friendly
Share

Reforming immigration for a post-Brexit reality

What impact could lower levels of immigration in the UK following Brexit have on the country’s economy? Lisa Laird and Otto Ilveskero write that the UK faces a challenge in retaining a controlled flow of both high and lower-skilled workers to fill gaps in the domestic workforce. They argue that reforming the present Visa Points Based System would allow Britain to retain international talent passing through […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

On 15 April, a campaign to hold a referendum on the final terms of the Brexit deal was launched in the UK. But do the public want another vote? And have attitudes toward holding a second referendum really changed in recent months, as some pro-EU campaigners suggest? Sir John Curtice states that there is little reason to think support for a second referendum […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How has the first year of the Brexit negotiations affected politics in the EU?

How has the first year of the Brexit negotiations affected politics in the EU?

It is now over a year since the UK triggered Article 50 and started the process for leaving the European Union. But what impact has the first year of negotiations had on politics elsewhere in the EU? Nicola Chelotti highlights that while many thought the UK’s decision to leave may have strengthened other Eurosceptic parties across Europe, there has […]

Print Friendly
Share

How not to fix the Irish border problem

The Irish border issue has proven to be one of the most difficult problems to solve in the Brexit negotiations so far. Katy Hayward responds to recent proposals by Shanker Singham on how to address the issue, arguing that the proposals not only overlook the complex realities of Northern Ireland/Ireland connections, but also ignore the enormity of what has been accomplished in the […]

Print Friendly
Share