Brexit

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    Refusing to dance to a Brexit tune: How the EU has misinterpreted Britain’s vote to leave

Refusing to dance to a Brexit tune: How the EU has misinterpreted Britain’s vote to leave

Britain has made numerous mistakes over Brexit, but the European Union’s record also needs to be analysed. Tim Oliver addresses some of the things the EU has been accused of getting wrong about Brexit. In this post, he looks at how the EU has misinterpreted Brexit.

Brexit has been a learning experience for all involved. British and EU negotiators have found […]

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    How to have a serious referendum on Brexit and avoid a rerun of the original

How to have a serious referendum on Brexit and avoid a rerun of the original

A number of things were wrong with the 2016 referendum, including the  disenfranchisement of key stakeholders and the extent of misinformation by both sides. Given that referendums should be informed exercises in democratic decision-making, Bruce Ackerman and Sir Julian Le Grand explain what a referendum on the deal should look like.

We are moving to a world where the decisions […]

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    Mutually assured destruction? Understanding the UK and Ireland’s standoff over the Northern Irish border

Mutually assured destruction? Understanding the UK and Ireland’s standoff over the Northern Irish border

Time is rapidly running out in the Brexit negotiations and there is still no agreement in sight on the issue of the Irish border. Gavin Barrett explains that despite the ultimatums emanating from each side, a no-deal Brexit would be catastrophic for both the UK and Ireland.

Tony Blair once famously compared then British Prime Minister David Cameron’s (badly miscalculated) […]

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How Brexit will affect Germany’s role in the EU

Given the size and influence of the UK, Brexit is expected to have a significant impact on the political dynamics within the EU’s institutions. Leopold Traugott assesses how Britain’s departure is likely to affect Germany’s role in the EU. He notes that Germany will be obliged to do more to fill the gap left by the UK, while the […]

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    Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Leavers have a better understanding of Remainers’ motivations than vice versa

Why did people really vote to Leave or Remain? Noah Carl examines four different polls, and finds that immigration and sovereignty headed Leavers’ reasons – contrary to suggestions that the vote was intended to ‘teach politicians a lesson’. Leavers also proved better at characterising Remainers’ reasons than vice versa – something which may be linked to progressives’ greater tendency to disengage from […]

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Reforming immigration for a post-Brexit reality

What impact could lower levels of immigration in the UK following Brexit have on the country’s economy? Lisa Laird and Otto Ilveskero write that the UK faces a challenge in retaining a controlled flow of both high and lower-skilled workers to fill gaps in the domestic workforce. They argue that reforming the present Visa Points Based System would allow Britain to retain international talent passing through […]

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    Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

Have attitudes toward a second Brexit referendum reached a ‘turning point’?

On 15 April, a campaign to hold a referendum on the final terms of the Brexit deal was launched in the UK. But do the public want another vote? And have attitudes toward holding a second referendum really changed in recent months, as some pro-EU campaigners suggest? Sir John Curtice states that there is little reason to think support for a second referendum […]

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    How has the first year of the Brexit negotiations affected politics in the EU?

How has the first year of the Brexit negotiations affected politics in the EU?

It is now over a year since the UK triggered Article 50 and started the process for leaving the European Union. But what impact has the first year of negotiations had on politics elsewhere in the EU? Nicola Chelotti highlights that while many thought the UK’s decision to leave may have strengthened other Eurosceptic parties across Europe, there has […]

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How not to fix the Irish border problem

The Irish border issue has proven to be one of the most difficult problems to solve in the Brexit negotiations so far. Katy Hayward responds to recent proposals by Shanker Singham on how to address the issue, arguing that the proposals not only overlook the complex realities of Northern Ireland/Ireland connections, but also ignore the enormity of what has been accomplished in the […]

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    Contrary to popular assumption, most Britons living in the EU27 aren’t retirees

Contrary to popular assumption, most Britons living in the EU27 aren’t retirees

There is a popular assumption that the majority of Britons living in the rest of the EU are pensioners, who have exercised their treaty rights to reside in another EU member state post-retirement. In fact, 80% of the UK citizens who have made their homes and lives in the EU27 are below retirement age. Discussing her fieldwork with Britons living in […]

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    Britain’s habit of cherry-picking criminal justice policy cannot survive Brexit

Britain’s habit of cherry-picking criminal justice policy cannot survive Brexit

The European Arrest Warrant is important to Theresa May. But, as Auke Willems explains, it will be difficult to negotiate the pan-European security co-operation she wants unless Britain is prepared to cross the ‘red line’ of recognising the European Court of Justice, as well as the Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Cooperation on matters of police and criminal law – or security cooperation, […]

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    Brexit demonstrates the need for a normative theory of political disintegration

Brexit demonstrates the need for a normative theory of political disintegration

Brexit has given rise to a range of critical issues. For example, was the composition of the electorate for the referendum adequate? What follows from the fact that some parts of the UK voted to remain? What will happen to resident EU citizens? Will the EU try to make an example of the UK in the withdrawal negotiations? Markus Patberg argues […]

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    Identification with Englishness (not class or age) offers the best clue to understanding support for Brexit

Identification with Englishness (not class or age) offers the best clue to understanding support for Brexit

While commentators have often sought to explain Brexit as a form of resistance to globalisation, Jan Eichhorn argues we should treat such conclusions with caution since there are many factors at play when it comes to people’s political choices. He highlights that attempts to link Brexit to particular social classes or age groups underplays much of the division within these groups over the […]

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    Could Britain establish closer relations with China following Brexit?

Could Britain establish closer relations with China following Brexit?

If the UK is to develop closer relationships with non-EU states following Brexit, then China would undoubtedly have to rank as one of the country’s most important potential partners. Andrew Cottey assesses how the EU has sought to engage with China over recent decades, and what opportunities there could be for the UK after it leaves the EU. He argues […]

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    Watch: Sara Hagemann on what Brexit means for the EU’s institutions

Watch: Sara Hagemann on what Brexit means for the EU’s institutions

The UK has played a highly important role as a progressive and liberal voice in EU policy-making. But after its departure, EU institutions will change quite drastically over the next couple of years, argues Sara Hagemann, Associate Professor in European Politics at the LSE European Institute.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of EUROPP – European Politics […]

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    Brexit is a threat to London’s future in European payment systems

Brexit is a threat to London’s future in European payment systems

Future UK-EU relations are about to be negotiated in Brussels. While there are signs of improvement in many important policy areas such as citizens’ rights, the financial settlement, and the impact of Brexit on Ireland, little progress has been made on the role of the City as the location of Europe’s major clearing house, which is represented by the London Clearing […]

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    ‘Brexitannia’: An unsettling, beautiful insight into post-referendum Britain

‘Brexitannia’: An unsettling, beautiful insight into post-referendum Britain

Brexitannia is a sociological portrait of post-referendum Britain. Travelling around the UK, its director invited people to talk about Brexit and left their responses to speak for themselves. Oliver Daddow says the documentary is an unsettling insight into a country coming to terms with an imagined past, a leadership-less present and a manifestly uncertain future.

Put together in the immediate aftermath of […]

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Britain’s best Brexit bet is the Jersey option

The UK government spent last year urging the EU27 to start discussing their post-Brexit trading relationship. But now that the negotiations are finally due to move on to trade, ministers cannot decide what they want. Philippe Legrain argues that the Jersey option would give Britain a degree of regulatory freedom while minimising the disruption to trade with the EU.
The […]

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    Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Most observers agree that the chances of Turkey joining the EU are becoming increasingly remote. But even in early 2016, before the country’s failed coup attempt and the 2017 constitutional referendum, Turkish accession was looking a distant prospect. Yet as James Ker-Lindsay writes, this did not prevent Vote Leave from claiming towards the end of the UK’s EU referendum campaign that Turkey was poised to […]

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    What the 2015 Greek debt negotiations tell us about Germany’s negotiating stance on Brexit

What the 2015 Greek debt negotiations tell us about Germany’s negotiating stance on Brexit

If the UK wants to secure favourable terms during the Brexit negotiations, it will be crucial to win the support of Germany. But what are the key German priorities as the talks move on to the second phase? Luuk Molthof writes that the 2015 Greek debt negotiations offer some insights into the German approach, and that the UK is […]

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