Brexit

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    From Brexit to the pensions crisis, how did the Baby Boomers get the blame for everything?

From Brexit to the pensions crisis, how did the Baby Boomers get the blame for everything?

Baby Boomers – those who are currently between 50 and 70 years old – are often blamed by younger generations for many issues, from those associated with pensions and healthcare, to the unaffordability of housing, and even the vote to leave the EU. Jennie Bristow outlines the discourse and explains its implications.
Amidst the raw outrage that followed the EU […]

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    In some respects the Brexit referendum was a violation of human rights

In some respects the Brexit referendum was a violation of human rights

In some respects the Brexit referendum itself was a violation of human rights, argues Adrian Low. Three substantial groups were denied the opportunity to vote when inclusion of any two of those groups would almost certainly have reversed the result. Rational democratic decision-making was negated by a campaign of exaggeration and lies and unnecessary poll predictions encouraged complacency in […]

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    So MPs have backed the Article 50 bill – what happens now?

So MPs have backed the Article 50 bill – what happens now?

On 1 February, MPs voted to allow Theresa May to trigger Article 50 and begin the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union. Andrew Crines states that the vote has strengthened the government’s position, but with the EU likely to drive an extremely hard bargain, the arguments from the referendum will now have to be put aside if the UK […]

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    Why has Brexit failed to boost support for Scottish independence?

Why has Brexit failed to boost support for Scottish independence?

In the immediate aftermath of the UK’s decision to leave the EU, several opinion polls showed a majority of people in Scotland would vote for independence in a hypothetical second referendum. However, as Sean Swan writes, the polling in recent months has shown a consistent majority of respondents opposing independence. He isolates three key reasons why Brexit has not […]

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    How international regulatory cooperation can ease a ‘hard’ Brexit

How international regulatory cooperation can ease a ‘hard’ Brexit

Many observers viewed Theresa May’s speech on 17 January as a sign that the UK is heading for a so called ‘hard Brexit’ after leaving the EU. But what is the most likely outcome of the upcoming Brexit negotiations and how can the UK minimise any negative economic consequences? Robert Basedow argues that a ‘hard’ Brexit is unlikely to […]

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    In defence of representative democracy: How I will be voting on the Article 50 bill, by Graham Allen MP

In defence of representative democracy: How I will be voting on the Article 50 bill, by Graham Allen MP

Following the Supreme Court’s ruling that an Act of Parliament will be required before the government can send its formal Article 50 notification to the Council of the European Union, Graham Allen MP explains why he will not vote for such a bill while the government’s negotiation strategy is unclear. He clarifies that his decision is not about ignoring […]

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    No longer welcome: the EU academics in Britain told to ‘make arrangements to leave’

No longer welcome: the EU academics in Britain told to ‘make arrangements to leave’

Some EU citizens living in Britain who decided to seek permanent residency after the Brexit vote are being told to make arrangements to leave. A number of these people are among the 31,000 EU academics currently working in UK universities. Colin Talbot says many are alarmed and some have already decided to leave – putting the expertise of Britain’s universities […]

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    The Supreme Court ruling explained: The government requires primary legislation before it can change the constitution

The Supreme Court ruling explained: The government requires primary legislation before it can change the constitution

The Supreme Court’s ruling against the government is measured and restrained in tone – but it is the most important constitutional case the Court has ever heard, writes Jo Murkens. The Justices have ruled that the government cannot leave the EU without Parliament’s consent. And while they also declared EU membership a reserved matter and therefore one that must be […]

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    Following May’s speech, we now have a clear picture of what an EU-UK free trade agreement could look like

Following May’s speech, we now have a clear picture of what an EU-UK free trade agreement could look like

With Theresa May indicating that the UK will leave the single market following its exit from the EU, what kind of agreement is likely to be on the table during the Brexit negotiations? Mark Manger writes that the general parameters of an EU-UK free trade agreement can now be sketched out, but that the government is still demonstrating a […]

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    The German reaction to Theresa May’s speech: A mixed response to ‘hard Brexit’

The German reaction to Theresa May’s speech: A mixed response to ‘hard Brexit’

Theresa May’s speech on 17 January laid out some of the key aims of the UK government as it seeks to leave the European Union. Inez von Weitershausen presents an overview of the reactions from Germany, writing that responses ranged from anger and disappointment to more hopeful calls for a constructive relationship with the UK following Brexit.

Those commentators suggesting […]

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    Theresa May’s speech: The Prime Minister has set the wrong course on Brexit

Theresa May’s speech: The Prime Minister has set the wrong course on Brexit

On 17 January, Theresa May gave an outline of the objectives the UK government intends to pursue in its negotiations to leave the European Union. Steve Peers reacts to the contents of the speech, arguing that although some of the speech was valuable, the decision to leave the single market has put politics ahead of the country’s economic interests.

Yesterday’s speech by […]

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    Scotland, Brexit and Spain: A special deal for Scotland is unlikely

Scotland, Brexit and Spain: A special deal for Scotland is unlikely

Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has indicated that she may call a second independence referendum if the UK government pursues a ‘hard’ Brexit. Paul Anderson writes on the options for Scotland, and the role Spain could play as it seeks to deal with its own secession issue in Catalonia. He states that it is unlikely a special deal for […]

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    Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

Immigration policy will be the test of Theresa May’s “shared society”

The Prime Minister has a vision for a “shared society”. Yet, the Brexit vote revealed that large sections of the population have a vision for an old order. Tony Hockley writes that in this context, the government’s immigration policy is critical. He sees Brexit as an opportunity to shift norms of local identity, and draws on the Conservative Party’s […]

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    The EU should abandon ‘ever closer union’ in favour of ‘flexible differentiation’ after Brexit

The EU should abandon ‘ever closer union’ in favour of ‘flexible differentiation’ after Brexit

The phrase ‘ever closer union’ has been a stated goal of the European integration project since its inclusion in the Treaty of Rome in 1957, but following Brexit is it now time to reassess the direction of the integration process? Pol Morillas writes that with radically different integration ambitions now present among the member states, a strategy of ‘flexible […]

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    What happened to the ‘£350m’ Britain was to take back from the EU?

What happened to the ‘£350m’ Britain was to take back from the EU?

The toxic issue of how much Britain pays into the EU budget is a long way from being settled, writes Iain Begg. None of the pro-Brexit ministers in government now claims that the figure of £350m the UK was supposedly sending to Brussels each week will be available for domestic spending. Indeed, the cost of Brexit to the public finances has […]

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    How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

How Article 127 of the EEA Agreement could keep the UK in the single market

Much of the discussion around Brexit has focused on when the UK will formally trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and begin the process for leaving the EU. As Gavin Barrett writes, however, the procedure for leaving the single market is potentially more complex due to the UK’s participation in the European Economic Area, which has its own […]

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    Without liberalism, democracy is dreadful. Fortunately we have both

Without liberalism, democracy is dreadful. Fortunately we have both

It is quite all right to hate democracy. T. F. Rhoden dislikes democracy immensely. Without classical liberalism, he argues, it is normal to mistrust democracy in its purer form. Democracy is dreadful without the classifier “liberal” in front – because liberalism is a safeguard against democracy’s inherent decadence of rule by the people. 

Whatever one thinks of Donald Trump’s election and Brexit, we might […]

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    The Scottish Government’s Brexit proposals are politically savvy and all-but-impossible

The Scottish Government’s Brexit proposals are politically savvy and all-but-impossible

Nicola Sturgeon recently unveiled her government’s well-trailed, long-awaited Brexit paper. The 62-page paper sets out two options. The Scottish Government’s preferred outcome is for the UK to participate fully in the European single market and to remain within the EU’s customs union. Daniel Kenealy argues that these plans may be politically savvy, but are all-but-impossible to put into practice.

Sturgeon proposes that […]

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Brexit: Six months on

The six months since the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union have been the most tumultuous in British politics since WW2, according to a new report: Brexit: Six months on. The team from UK in a Changing Europe provide an overview of the report’s findings and where its contributors predict the UK will go next in 2017.

Within […]

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    Don’t mention this around the Christmas table: Brexit, inequality and the demographic divide

Don’t mention this around the Christmas table: Brexit, inequality and the demographic divide

A great deal of research has already been conducted on why the UK voted to leave the EU and which groups of voters were most likely to back leave and remain. Danny Dorling, Ben Stuart and Joshua Stubbs present a comprehensive analysis of the vote, writing that although there is generally a stark age divide amongst voters concerning the European Union, the […]

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