Brexit

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    Brexit and fishing: How can the UK deliver a ‘successful’ fisheries policy after Brexit?

Brexit and fishing: How can the UK deliver a ‘successful’ fisheries policy after Brexit?

Halfway through the Brexit negotiations and delivering on the promises made to voters in the run up to the Brexit vote with regards to fishing remains an incredibly tough task. Richard Barnes, Chris Williams, Bryce Stewart, Bethan O’Leary, Thomas Appleby, and Griffin Carpenter write that ‘success’ for the UK will only be possible by working with its EU neighbours, and […]

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    What does the breakthrough in the Brexit negotiations mean for higher education?

What does the breakthrough in the Brexit negotiations mean for higher education?

EU leaders agreed to move to the next stage of the Brexit negotiations at a European Council meeting on 15 December. Anne Corbett and Claire Gordon assess what the breakthrough in the negotiations might mean for the future of higher education and research following Brexit. They note that the agreement has been welcomed by higher education leaders in the […]

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    May’s Irish dilemma is a precursor of even more intractable dilemmas of Brexit to come

May’s Irish dilemma is a precursor of even more intractable dilemmas of Brexit to come

Those who wished the UK to leave the EU fell into two quite different camps: those who wanted Brexit to mark a decisive break in the economic and social life of the United Kingdom; and those who wanted Brexit to take place with minimal social and economic disruption. Brendan Donnelly argues that this division is at the heart of the […]

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    Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

Why the Republic and Northern Ireland need shared regulatory frameworks

On 4 December, the UK and the EU failed to reach an agreement to move on to the next stage of the Brexit talks, with reports suggesting the Democratic Unionist Party had refused to accept proposed concessions on the Irish border. Anand Menon explains why there are strong reasons for shared regulatory frameworks on both sides of the Irish […]

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    Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move the Brexit negotiations on

Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move the Brexit negotiations on

After threatening to pay nothing to the EU, then conceding £20bn, the UK government has finally indicated it will pay a Brexit ‘divorce bill’ of £40-50bn. The initial reaction from Eurosceptics has been rather muted, writes Iain Begg. But if the European Council does not allow exit negotiations to move to the next stage, we can expect a serious backlash […]

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    Brits in Spain: four broad Brexit narratives (though sometimes it’s best to avoid the topic)

Brits in Spain: four broad Brexit narratives (though sometimes it’s best to avoid the topic)

At least 300,000 Britons live in Spain. Joel Busher has spoken to a number of those in Mallorca and the Costa Blanca about their views and feelings for a British Academy-funded project about their Brexit journeys. He identifies four main narratives, which range from optimism and confidence about life post-Brexit to dismay and anger. Many are careful about what they say […]

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    Article 50 does allow Britain to negotiate a transitional period

Article 50 does allow Britain to negotiate a transitional period

Theresa May intends to negotiate a transitional period after March 2019, during which people, businesses and services would have time to adapt to Brexit while the current regulatory framework is maintained. But it is still unclear how Britain will do this. Federico Ortino and Holger Hestermeyer argue that as far as the legal picture is concerned, Article 50 does allow the UK to postpone the […]

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Will Christmas come early in the Brexit negotiations?

Michel Barnier has indicated that the UK has two weeks left to make concessions if the Brexit negotiations are to advance to the next stage at the December European Council meeting. Simon Usherwood writes that the next fortnight is set to be critical in determining whether the UK and EU are ready to make progress in settling their evolving relationship.

Michel Barnier, Credit: EU Council Eurozone […]

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    The internal contradictions of the Brexit project are unbridgeable

The internal contradictions of the Brexit project are unbridgeable

In his recent testimony to the House of Lords, Sir Ivan Rogers criticised as premature and ill-prepared the Prime Minister’s triggering last March of Article 50. Brendan Donnelly argues that this is unfair to Theresa May. No different date for the beginning of the Brexit negotiations could or would have rendered them any less painful for the British participants. And […]

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    The reluctant role model: Why Britain (usually) obeys the European Court of Human Rights

The reluctant role model: Why Britain (usually) obeys the European Court of Human Rights

Despite often complaining about the existence of the European Court of Human Rights, the UK has one of the strongest compliance records in the Court’s 47-country system. Zoë Jay explains how the UK’s conceptions of human rights protection shape its willingness to comply with the Court’s rulings.

European Court of Human Rights, Credit: Emiliano (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
To say the United […]

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    The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in UK prices, especially food

The Brexit vote has caused a significant rise in UK prices, especially food

Since Britain’s EU referendum, UK inflation has risen faster than that of the Eurozone. Price rises have varied across sectors, but as Josh De Lyon, Swati Dhingra, and Stephen Machin show, the rise in the growth rate of food prices has been particularly pronounced. As a result, real wage growth in the UK has again turned negative. 

The pattern of significantly higher price inflation […]

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    Most British MPs used to avoid tweeting about the EU, leaving Eurosceptics to fill the gap

Most British MPs used to avoid tweeting about the EU, leaving Eurosceptics to fill the gap

There was a time when the topic of the EU had little salience in British politics. Resul Umit presents an analysis of tweets by MPs in Ireland, Westminster and the devolved governments in 2014-15, highlighting that few tweeted much about EU affairs, especially if they were in unsafe seats. He argues that this allowed Eurosceptic politicians to fill the gap and effectively ‘own’ the […]

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    Survey evidence: Europeans support the EU’s hard line in the Brexit negotiations

Survey evidence: Europeans support the EU’s hard line in the Brexit negotiations

The British government has been frustrated by the hard negotiating line pursued by the EU under the lead of Michel Barnier, and the unusual degree of unity in supporting the EU’s Brexit negotiation strategy has surprised quite a few observers. Drawing on recent survey evidence, Stefanie Walter reflects on the Brexit process through EU-27 eyes, and concludes that by and large Europeans […]

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    Brussels may have agreed to accelerate the Brexit negotiations – but Merkel’s priorities lie elsewhere

Brussels may have agreed to accelerate the Brexit negotiations – but Merkel’s priorities lie elsewhere

At her meetings in Brussels this week, Theresa May and the European Commission agreed to ‘accelerate’ the stalled Brexit negotiations. But, as John Ryan writes, after a bruising election result, Angela Merkel will be preoccupied with coalition talks until Christmas. The UK should not expect major concessions from Germany, which knows its principal interest is in preserving the Single Market.

The German […]

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    The gaffe that keeps on taking: How to break the deadlock over Britain’s EU divorce bill

The gaffe that keeps on taking: How to break the deadlock over Britain’s EU divorce bill

The size of the ‘divorce bill’ the UK will pay following its exit from the EU remains one of the key sticking points in the Brexit negotiations. Iain Begg writes that despite the apparent deadlock over the issue, it would not take much to reach a compromise. He suggests that extending the idea of an implementation phase to the […]

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Why there is no brain drain (yet) of EU academics in the UK

A predicted exodus of EU academics from British universities has not yet materialised. Helen de Cruz discusses why, despite the uncertainty hanging over their future status and rights, the ‘brain drain’ has not really begun yet. Finding new posts, especially at a very senior level, can take time; hiring systems elsewhere in Europe are opaque and sometimes not meritocratic; […]

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    There has been no domino effect – Brexit is close to constituting a non-issue in European politics

There has been no domino effect – Brexit is close to constituting a non-issue in European politics

Following the Netherlands and France, Germany was the third of the original EU members to hold a national election this year. The three election campaigns had at least one thing in common: the consequences of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union didn’t feature as much as some may have expected. Stijn Van Kessel argues that there are no signs of […]

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    Five minutes with Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

Five minutes with Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

In October 2016, the leader of the UK’s Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, appointed Shami Chakrabarti as Shadow Attorney General for England and Wales. In a discussion with British Politics and Policy editor Artemis Photiadou and EUROPP’s Tena Prelec, she reflects on the challenges and advantages of the position, the situation faced by EU citizens living in the UK, and the key issues on the horizon […]

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    Boris Johnson has demonstrated a capacity for scheming that Machiavelli would have applauded

Boris Johnson has demonstrated a capacity for scheming that Machiavelli would have applauded

The UK’s foreign minister, Boris Johnson, is set to address the Conservative Party conference today amidst suggestions that he is deliberately undermining Theresa May’s leadership of the party. George Kassimeris argues that for all the criticism Boris receives, he has demonstrated a capacity for scheming and ruthlessness that Machiavelli would have applauded, and which could yet take him into […]

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    Legatum Institute’s solution for the Brexit border is highly problematic

Legatum Institute’s solution for the Brexit border is highly problematic

The Legatum Institute, a think tank that is considered to have a significant degree of influence over the UK’s approach to Brexit, recently published a paper on resolving the Irish border issue following Britain’s exit from the EU. Katy Hayward and Maurice Campbell argue that the proposals are based on misperceptions of the border and the situation in Northern Ireland, as well as of the fundamentals […]

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