Brexit

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    How can Brexit be an economic success when the economics establishment is united in predicting a disaster?

How can Brexit be an economic success when the economics establishment is united in predicting a disaster?

The Economists for Free Trade group has argued that contrary to the predictions of many economists, Brexit could provide gains to the UK economy of around £135 billion. Kent Matthews argues that the differences between Economists for Free Trade and other economists stem from distinct theoretical assumptions about how trade functions, and that the only way to resolve this […]

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Why Brexit has led to falling real wages in the UK

The UK has not yet left the European Union and the long-term economic effects of Brexit remain unknown. However, one of the trends which has attracted attention so far is a drop in real wages for UK workers, which many economists have put down to the immediate depreciation of the pound after the referendum and a subsequent rise in […]

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Is EU talent being chased away from the UK by Brexit?

Several UK employers and business representatives have expressed concern that the UK’s exit from the European Union could damage the country’s ability to attract skilled workers from the rest of the EU. Matthias Busse and Mikkel Barslund use LinkedIn data to examine whether these concerns are justified. They find support for the view that Brexit has reduced the attractiveness […]

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    Could the UK use the EFTA Court to resolve disputes following Brexit?

Could the UK use the EFTA Court to resolve disputes following Brexit?

The UK government has said it wants the country to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. Carl Baudenbacher, the President of the EFTA Court, argues that Britain could use his court to resolve disputes. He explains the mutually enlightening relationship between the two courts and rejects the claim that the EFTA Court is easily outgunned by […]

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    If the UK wants to cut immigration, it must change its model of capitalism

If the UK wants to cut immigration, it must change its model of capitalism

The British economy is structurally dependent on migrant workers because it is lightly regulated and depends heavily on domestic demand, write Alexandre Afonso and Camilla Devitt. They explain why less immigration will require a greater role for the state.

The desire to lower immigration was one of the main drivers behind the Brexit vote. Now, Theresa May’s cabinet has signaled […]

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    Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The UK government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. Thomas Sampson argues that the proposal is incomplete and leaves five key questions about the UK’s position unanswered.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition agreement […]

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    The UK needs to come up with flexible and imaginative solutions for the Irish border

The UK needs to come up with flexible and imaginative solutions for the Irish border

The future relationship between the UK and the EU following Brexit has the potential to alter the nature of the border between the UK and Ireland. Katy Hayward considers how the three most likely scenarios would translate into trade relations and what the result would be for the UK-Irish border.

The European Council has given an unusual playing card to the UK government by […]

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    If Britain doesn’t pay the Brexit divorce bill, her ex-partners will have to

If Britain doesn’t pay the Brexit divorce bill, her ex-partners will have to

Walking away from the EU without paying a ‘divorce bill’ – or only a small one – would have major consequences for the remaining member states, because they would be forced to make up the shortfall for EU projects until 2021. That would leave the UK short of goodwill, writes Michiel Scheffer, a regional minister in the Netherlands, and […]

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Is the UK economy starting to falter?

All of a sudden Britain has become the slowest growing of the major western economies, and there are increasing concerns about its medium-term outlook. Iain Begg writes that with both government and opposition fixated on what kind of Brexit to favour, there is a growing risk that fundamental and necessary measures to underpin the economy will be neglected.

Until well after the turn […]

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    How Brexit could harm African economies that trade with the UK and disrupt regional integration

How Brexit could harm African economies that trade with the UK and disrupt regional integration

The UK must pay urgent attention to the complexities of African trade in order to avoid Brexit having damaging effects on the continent, explains Peg Murray-Evans. Failure to do so could mean new barriers to trade developing between the UK and vulnerable African economies, while Brexit could also lead to a disruption to regional integration.

Addis Ababa, Credit: Babak Fakhamzadeh (CC BY-NC-2.0)
In […]

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A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were, Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

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    Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in EU […]

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    CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

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    All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

EU residency rights have gendered consequences, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’ and […]

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    Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

The idea of a vote on the final Brexit deal is an appealing one to Remainers, says Steve Bullock. But by Christmas 2018, after acrimonious negotiations, the rest of the EU may be in no mood to give the UK a second chance. In any case, there would be no time to renegotiate before the 2019 deadline, which would mean […]

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    There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

The UK’s Article 50 letter which triggered its exit from the European Union also indicated that the country would be leaving the European nuclear regulator Euratom following Brexit. However, several MPs, including some prominent leave campaigners, have criticised this position, arguing instead for the UK to have some form of associate membership of Euratom after it leaves the EU. […]

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    A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

The prospects for ‘frictionless’ and ‘invisible’ solutions for the Irish border after Brexit are limited. Katy Hayward outlines a ‘practical’ summary of the difference that would be made by a ‘hard’ Brexit to the movement of goods across the Irish border. 

Michel Barnier’s dismissal of the notion of ‘frictionless’ trade between the UK and EU after Brexit has direct ramifications for one of the […]

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    “A disgusting political lie”: EU parents respond to the Children’s Commissioner’s letter to Michel Barnier

“A disgusting political lie”: EU parents respond to the Children’s Commissioner’s letter to Michel Barnier

On 13 July, the Children’s Commissioner for England wrote a letter to the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator outlining concerns over the status of children with non-UK EU passports living in England. Nando Sigona argues that by placing the blame for the current situation on the EU, the Commissioner has obscured the role of the UK government in creating uncertainty […]

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    ‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

The run-up to the Brexit negotiations has been disastrous for the UK, writes former negotiator Steve Bullock. It has hectored and insulted the EU27’s intelligence and undermined its own credibility. The chances of securing a good deal in the time left are minimal: approaching extremely complex negotiations, Britain chose to be ‘bloody difficult’.

Being “tough” and being “difficult” are not the […]

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    It’s education, stupid: How globalisation has made education the new political cleavage in Europe

It’s education, stupid: How globalisation has made education the new political cleavage in Europe

Several recent European elections, as well as the UK’s referendum on Brexit, have produced a clear split in voting choices between citizens with different levels of education. Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille argue that a new political cleavage in Europe has emerged between citizens with high levels of education and those with lower levels of educational attainment, with the […]

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