Brexit

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Brexit talks have started, but have the French and British elections changed the tone?

The Brexit talks have started, but have the French and British elections changed the tone?

Britain’s negotiations to leave the European Union formally began on 19 June, but it is still unclear what impact the unexpected result of the UK’s general election will have on the process. Julian M Hoerner indicates that from the EU’s perspective, little has changed following the election as the EU had already decided on its negotiating position in advance. However, […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Boris Johnson might have the political capital to avert a Hard Brexit

Boris Johnson might have the political capital to avert a Hard Brexit

If Theresa May manages to carry on as Prime Minister, her precarious position within the Conservative Party and in Parliament will leave her a weaker negotiator. Kevin Featherstone argues that if she fights on – and either returns from Brussels without a deal, or is ousted after failing to secure an acceptable one – Tory party politics make a hard Brexit inevitable. Were Boris Johnson […]

Print Friendly
Share

The GE2017 outcome was no Remainers’ revenge

British PM Theresa May’s election battering had nothing to do with Brexit, argues Brian Melican. Politically speaking, Britain is now a post-Brexit landscape: for politicians the process might only be starting, but for voters it has already happened. 

It’s become a truism that being a pollster is hard work these days. Yet while the problems plaguing psephologists are now almost proverbial and […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    UK voters, including Leavers, care more about reducing non-EU than EU migration

UK voters, including Leavers, care more about reducing non-EU than EU migration

­
Despite the argument that Brexit was about sovereignty and only secondarily about immigration, new data suggest otherwise. Simon Hix, Eric Kaufmann, and Thomas J. Leeper show the importance of reducing immigration levels – especially from outside the EU – to British voters.
Brexit leaders such as Boris Johnson have maintained a narrative that sovereignty, not immigration, was the key motivation […]

Print Friendly
Share

The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design

The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design by ignoring Kenneth Arrow’s impossibility theorem, writes Thomas Colignatus. As he explains, referendums can be considered democratically legitimate only if voters can make an informed decision. and it is questionable whether the UK’s referendum on the EU produced a sound choice in the first place.  

Theresa May’s government, with support from […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How has Brexit, and other EU crises, affected party Euroscepticism across Europe?

How has Brexit, and other EU crises, affected party Euroscepticism across Europe?

Analysing the results of a new expert survey, Aleks Szczerbiak and Paul Taggart write that Brexit has so far had a very limited impact on national party politics across Europe beyond the UK, particularly compared with the earlier Eurozone and migration crisis. While the longer-term, dynamic effects of Brexit on party Euroscepticism might be greater and there are a […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Delusions and meddling: 30 years of Tory Euroscepticism are coming to the fore

Delusions and meddling: 30 years of Tory Euroscepticism are coming to the fore

The Conservative party’s relationship with the EU has come a long way since Edward Heath urged the UK to be ‘inside Europe’. Euroscepticism has a long history in the party, but the drift of public, media and Tory sentiment away from European unity crystallised in 1988 under Margaret Thatcher. The Brexit process is now bringing these tensions to the fore, […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Not getting any easier: EU parliaments may yet get to vote on Brexit terms

Not getting any easier: EU parliaments may yet get to vote on Brexit terms

While the power of national parliaments in the European Union has generally been increased over the last two decades, as means of democratising the EU, their involvement in the Brexit process will further complicate the negotiations and prove difficult for the the next British government to handle, writes Julian M Hörner.

Hungary’s parliament building, Budapest. Credits: Godot 13 (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Amidst the triggering of Article […]

Print Friendly
Share

What Macron’s victory means for Brexit

As one of the EU’s most powerful states, France will have a large say over the final outcome of the Brexit negotiations. Andrew Glencross assesses how Emmanuel Macron’s victory in the French presidential elections will impact on the process. Macron could pursue a tougher line on Brexit than his predecessor, while the current border arrangements between the UK and […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Soft Brexit, soft landing? Interpreting Labour’s Brexit strategy

Soft Brexit, soft landing? Interpreting Labour’s Brexit strategy

Will the decision to back a soft Brexit hurt Labour’s prospects in the upcoming election further, or would it help? And what would it do to Labour’s prospects in the long run? Ben Margulies looks at the evidence and explains how Labour can avoid becoming irrelevant and how it can recover its position as the leading party of the […]

Print Friendly
Share

The UK’s snap election makes a softer Brexit more likely

Theresa May has announced plans to call a UK general election for 8 June. Tim Bale writes that there is little doubt about the result, with the Conservatives a long distance ahead of Labour in the polls. But if the election does deliver a large majority for May, it could make a ‘softer Brexit’ far more likely as she will be […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Ireland and Brexit: Turning potential negative consequences into bargaining leverage

Ireland and Brexit: Turning potential negative consequences into bargaining leverage

Ireland is arguably the EU state with the most to lose from Brexit, given its close relationship with the UK. Anthony Costello argues that although the UK’s decision to leave could have clear negative economic and political consequences for Ireland, there is also an opportunity for the country to use the situation to increase its bargaining power and gain meaningful […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    There’s still a lot to play for: the four elements of a pro-European hard Brexit

There’s still a lot to play for: the four elements of a pro-European hard Brexit

Like it or not, Britain is leaving the single market. But there is still plenty to play for, argues Simon Hix. With a deep and comprehensive free trade agreement, we could limit the economic damage. This probably means accepting some EU regulatory standards and devising a scheme to allow EU citizens to work in the UK (and vice versa). The […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Now Article 50 has been triggered, will the United Kingdom survive?

Now Article 50 has been triggered, will the United Kingdom survive?

The UK has formally given notice of its intention to leave the European Union by triggering Article 50. Janice Morphet assesses what the process will mean for the United Kingdom, writing that with a second independence referendum looming in Scotland, and a difficult picture emerging in Northern Ireland, the British Prime Minister could be soon be fighting on two fronts […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

The Scottish and UK governments should beware the Ides of March

Theresa May and Nicola Sturgeon will meet today to discuss the triggering of Article 50, which will begin the process of the UK leaving the European Union. Simon Toubeau and Jo Murkens assess the likely issues up for discussion, noting that if the two leaders maintain the direction they have taken, there could be a bumpy road ahead for […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    A second independence referendum in Scotland: The legal issues

A second independence referendum in Scotland: The legal issues

Following Nicola Sturgeon’s announcement of a second independence referendum for Scotland, Stephen Tierney discusses how the next two years are set to be consumed by two parallel processes: We will see the UK leave the EU and could also see Scotland leave the UK in an effort to remain within the EU. 

Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh. Credits: Laszlo Ilyes (CC BY 2.0)
Scottish […]

Print Friendly
Share

Indyref2: A bold but unsurprising move from Nicola Sturgeon

In a speech on 13 March, Nicola Sturgeon outlined her intention to call a second Scottish independence referendum. Paul Anderson writes that while the announcement was not surprising given recent speculation, it was nevertheless a bold move on the part of Sturgeon. Only time will tell, however, whether she will be remembered as the First Minister who presided over […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Abused in the street, invited to a Brexit BBQ: the limbo of being German in the UK

Abused in the street, invited to a Brexit BBQ: the limbo of being German in the UK

An EU citizen is an EU citizen, writes Tanja Bueltmann, and the government has made it abundantly clear that we are all in limbo until a deal to secure our rights is negotiated with the EU – if such a deal can be done. Politicians have chosen not to oppose the wave of xenophobia sweeping across the country, but […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Bridging the channel, Credit: Jonathan Oakley (CC-BY-SA-2.0)Gallery

    On the merits of the UK staying in Erasmus post-Brexit – and why the programme must look beyond university students

On the merits of the UK staying in Erasmus post-Brexit – and why the programme must look beyond university students

Although some countries that are not EU members participate in the Erasmus student exchange programme, it is unclear whether the UK will continue its participation following Brexit. Charlie Cadywould writes that educational and cultural exchanges will be vital for ensuring Britain does not close itself off from Europe, but that programmes like Erasmus need to do a much better […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Northern Ireland illustrates the threat Brexit poses for the UK’s political stability

Northern Ireland illustrates the threat Brexit poses for the UK’s political stability

Northern Ireland held elections on 2 March against the backdrop of the UK’s preparations for leaving the European Union. Janice Morphet writes that Brexit raises several important questions about Northern Ireland’s status within the UK which could also have a major impact on the nature of devolution across the rest of the country.

Despite the intermittent warm words and flying […]

Print Friendly
Share