Brexit

  • Permalink Gallery

    The gaffe that keeps on taking: How to break the deadlock over Britain’s EU divorce bill

The gaffe that keeps on taking: How to break the deadlock over Britain’s EU divorce bill

The size of the ‘divorce bill’ the UK will pay following its exit from the EU remains one of the key sticking points in the Brexit negotiations. Iain Begg writes that despite the apparent deadlock over the issue, it would not take much to reach a compromise. He suggests that extending the idea of an implementation phase to the […]

Print Friendly
Share

Why there is no brain drain (yet) of EU academics in the UK

A predicted exodus of EU academics from British universities has not yet materialised. Helen de Cruz discusses why, despite the uncertainty hanging over their future status and rights, the ‘brain drain’ has not really begun yet. Finding new posts, especially at a very senior level, can take time; hiring systems elsewhere in Europe are opaque and sometimes not meritocratic; […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    There has been no domino effect – Brexit is close to constituting a non-issue in European politics

There has been no domino effect – Brexit is close to constituting a non-issue in European politics

Following the Netherlands and France, Germany was the third of the original EU members to hold a national election this year. The three election campaigns had at least one thing in common: the consequences of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union didn’t feature as much as some may have expected. Stijn Van Kessel argues that there are no signs of […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Five minutes with Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

Five minutes with Shami Chakrabarti: “Not guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals isn’t politics – it’s cruelty”

In October 2016, the leader of the UK’s Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, appointed Shami Chakrabarti as Shadow Attorney General for England and Wales. In a discussion with British Politics and Policy editor Artemis Photiadou and EUROPP’s Tena Prelec, she reflects on the challenges and advantages of the position, the situation faced by EU citizens living in the UK, and the key issues on the horizon […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Boris Johnson has demonstrated a capacity for scheming that Machiavelli would have applauded

Boris Johnson has demonstrated a capacity for scheming that Machiavelli would have applauded

The UK’s foreign minister, Boris Johnson, is set to address the Conservative Party conference today amidst suggestions that he is deliberately undermining Theresa May’s leadership of the party. George Kassimeris argues that for all the criticism Boris receives, he has demonstrated a capacity for scheming and ruthlessness that Machiavelli would have applauded, and which could yet take him into […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Legatum Institute’s solution for the Brexit border is highly problematic

Legatum Institute’s solution for the Brexit border is highly problematic

The Legatum Institute, a think tank that is considered to have a significant degree of influence over the UK’s approach to Brexit, recently published a paper on resolving the Irish border issue following Britain’s exit from the EU. Katy Hayward and Maurice Campbell argue that the proposals are based on misperceptions of the border and the situation in Northern Ireland, as well as of the fundamentals […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Is the UK’s economy really as strong as the government says it is?

Is the UK’s economy really as strong as the government says it is?

The latest UK unemployment figures showed unemployment at its lowest level since the 1970s, but there has also been a decline in real wages of 0.4% over the last year. Drawing on a new report by the Institute for Public Policy Research, Grace Blakeley explains that despite the headline figures on employment, the UK still faces a number of major economic challenges.

As the UK […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How can Brexit be an economic success when the economics establishment is united in predicting a disaster?

How can Brexit be an economic success when the economics establishment is united in predicting a disaster?

The Economists for Free Trade group has argued that contrary to the predictions of many economists, Brexit could provide gains to the UK economy of around £135 billion. Kent Matthews argues that the differences between Economists for Free Trade and other economists stem from distinct theoretical assumptions about how trade functions, and that the only way to resolve this […]

Print Friendly
Share

Why Brexit has led to falling real wages in the UK

The UK has not yet left the European Union and the long-term economic effects of Brexit remain unknown. However, one of the trends which has attracted attention so far is a drop in real wages for UK workers, which many economists have put down to the immediate depreciation of the pound after the referendum and a subsequent rise in […]

Print Friendly
Share

Is EU talent being chased away from the UK by Brexit?

Several UK employers and business representatives have expressed concern that the UK’s exit from the European Union could damage the country’s ability to attract skilled workers from the rest of the EU. Matthias Busse and Mikkel Barslund use LinkedIn data to examine whether these concerns are justified. They find support for the view that Brexit has reduced the attractiveness […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Could the UK use the EFTA Court to resolve disputes following Brexit?

Could the UK use the EFTA Court to resolve disputes following Brexit?

The UK government has said it wants the country to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. Carl Baudenbacher, the President of the EFTA Court, argues that Britain could use his court to resolve disputes. He explains the mutually enlightening relationship between the two courts and rejects the claim that the EFTA Court is easily outgunned by […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    If the UK wants to cut immigration, it must change its model of capitalism

If the UK wants to cut immigration, it must change its model of capitalism

The British economy is structurally dependent on migrant workers because it is lightly regulated and depends heavily on domestic demand, write Alexandre Afonso and Camilla Devitt. They explain why less immigration will require a greater role for the state.

The desire to lower immigration was one of the main drivers behind the Brexit vote. Now, Theresa May’s cabinet has signaled […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

Five important questions the UK government’s Brexit customs plan fails to answer

The UK government’s recent paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. Thomas Sampson argues that the proposal is incomplete and leaves five key questions about the UK’s position unanswered.

The most welcome aspect of the government’s policy paper on future customs arrangements is its acknowledgement of the desirability of a transition agreement […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The UK needs to come up with flexible and imaginative solutions for the Irish border

The UK needs to come up with flexible and imaginative solutions for the Irish border

The future relationship between the UK and the EU following Brexit has the potential to alter the nature of the border between the UK and Ireland. Katy Hayward considers how the three most likely scenarios would translate into trade relations and what the result would be for the UK-Irish border.

The European Council has given an unusual playing card to the UK government by […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    If Britain doesn’t pay the Brexit divorce bill, her ex-partners will have to

If Britain doesn’t pay the Brexit divorce bill, her ex-partners will have to

Walking away from the EU without paying a ‘divorce bill’ – or only a small one – would have major consequences for the remaining member states, because they would be forced to make up the shortfall for EU projects until 2021. That would leave the UK short of goodwill, writes Michiel Scheffer, a regional minister in the Netherlands, and […]

Print Friendly
Share

Is the UK economy starting to falter?

All of a sudden Britain has become the slowest growing of the major western economies, and there are increasing concerns about its medium-term outlook. Iain Begg writes that with both government and opposition fixated on what kind of Brexit to favour, there is a growing risk that fundamental and necessary measures to underpin the economy will be neglected.

Until well after the turn […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    How Brexit could harm African economies that trade with the UK and disrupt regional integration

How Brexit could harm African economies that trade with the UK and disrupt regional integration

The UK must pay urgent attention to the complexities of African trade in order to avoid Brexit having damaging effects on the continent, explains Peg Murray-Evans. Failure to do so could mean new barriers to trade developing between the UK and vulnerable African economies, while Brexit could also lead to a disruption to regional integration.

Addis Ababa, Credit: Babak Fakhamzadeh (CC BY-NC-2.0)
In […]

Print Friendly
Share

A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were, Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in EU […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

Print Friendly
Share