Brexit

A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were, Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

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    Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Brexit and the ECJ: If the UK plays in EU territory, it has to accept EU rules and referees

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in EU […]

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    CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

CEP study: The UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised […]

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    All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

All EU migrants are not equal: the gendered consequences of Brexit

EU residency rights have gendered consequences, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’ and […]

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    Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

Brexit can be stopped – but the window of opportunity is closing fast

The idea of a vote on the final Brexit deal is an appealing one to Remainers, says Steve Bullock. But by Christmas 2018, after acrimonious negotiations, the rest of the EU may be in no mood to give the UK a second chance. In any case, there would be no time to renegotiate before the 2019 deadline, which would mean […]

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    There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

There’s no such thing as ‘associate membership’ of Euratom

The UK’s Article 50 letter which triggered its exit from the European Union also indicated that the country would be leaving the European nuclear regulator Euratom following Brexit. However, several MPs, including some prominent leave campaigners, have criticised this position, arguing instead for the UK to have some form of associate membership of Euratom after it leaves the EU. […]

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    A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

A hard Irish border is quite possible, a frictionless one is an oxymoron

The prospects for ‘frictionless’ and ‘invisible’ solutions for the Irish border after Brexit are limited. Katy Hayward outlines a ‘practical’ summary of the difference that would be made by a ‘hard’ Brexit to the movement of goods across the Irish border. 

Michel Barnier’s dismissal of the notion of ‘frictionless’ trade between the UK and EU after Brexit has direct ramifications for one of the […]

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    “A disgusting political lie”: EU parents respond to the Children’s Commissioner’s letter to Michel Barnier

“A disgusting political lie”: EU parents respond to the Children’s Commissioner’s letter to Michel Barnier

On 13 July, the Children’s Commissioner for England wrote a letter to the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator outlining concerns over the status of children with non-UK EU passports living in England. Nando Sigona argues that by placing the blame for the current situation on the EU, the Commissioner has obscured the role of the UK government in creating uncertainty […]

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    ‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

‘Bloody difficult’ Britain has already blown its chances of a good deal from the EU27

The run-up to the Brexit negotiations has been disastrous for the UK, writes former negotiator Steve Bullock. It has hectored and insulted the EU27’s intelligence and undermined its own credibility. The chances of securing a good deal in the time left are minimal: approaching extremely complex negotiations, Britain chose to be ‘bloody difficult’.

Being “tough” and being “difficult” are not the […]

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    It’s education, stupid: How globalisation has made education the new political cleavage in Europe

It’s education, stupid: How globalisation has made education the new political cleavage in Europe

Several recent European elections, as well as the UK’s referendum on Brexit, have produced a clear split in voting choices between citizens with different levels of education. Mark Bovens and Anchrit Wille argue that a new political cleavage in Europe has emerged between citizens with high levels of education and those with lower levels of educational attainment, with the […]

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Taking back control – one year on. But control of what?

The referendum was all about ‘taking back control’ from Brussels. The idea resonated among voters not only because of migration policy, but due to a lack of control over economic and democratic matters, argues Sarah Longlands. With the first anniversary of the referendum, we need to rethink how we approach ‘control’.
The central argument of the ‘Vote leave’ campaign during […]

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    Shaped by pragmatism: What the Czechs want to get out of Brexit

Shaped by pragmatism: What the Czechs want to get out of Brexit

The UK is the Czech Republic’s fourth-largest export market, and many of its citizens live in Britain. Monika Brusenbauch Meislová looks at the country’s negotiating stance and asks whether it will stay in line with the rest of the EU27 – or whether domestic political pressures will lead it to break with the rest of the bloc.

Before the EU referendum, […]

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    The Brexit talks have started, but have the French and British elections changed the tone?

The Brexit talks have started, but have the French and British elections changed the tone?

Britain’s negotiations to leave the European Union formally began on 19 June, but it is still unclear what impact the unexpected result of the UK’s general election will have on the process. Julian M Hoerner indicates that from the EU’s perspective, little has changed following the election as the EU had already decided on its negotiating position in advance. However, […]

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    Boris Johnson might have the political capital to avert a Hard Brexit

Boris Johnson might have the political capital to avert a Hard Brexit

If Theresa May manages to carry on as Prime Minister, her precarious position within the Conservative Party and in Parliament will leave her a weaker negotiator. Kevin Featherstone argues that if she fights on – and either returns from Brussels without a deal, or is ousted after failing to secure an acceptable one – Tory party politics make a hard Brexit inevitable. Were Boris Johnson […]

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The GE2017 outcome was no Remainers’ revenge

British PM Theresa May’s election battering had nothing to do with Brexit, argues Brian Melican. Politically speaking, Britain is now a post-Brexit landscape: for politicians the process might only be starting, but for voters it has already happened. 

It’s become a truism that being a pollster is hard work these days. Yet while the problems plaguing psephologists are now almost proverbial and […]

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    UK voters, including Leavers, care more about reducing non-EU than EU migration

UK voters, including Leavers, care more about reducing non-EU than EU migration

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Despite the argument that Brexit was about sovereignty and only secondarily about immigration, new data suggest otherwise. Simon Hix, Eric Kaufmann, and Thomas J. Leeper show the importance of reducing immigration levels – especially from outside the EU – to British voters.
Brexit leaders such as Boris Johnson have maintained a narrative that sovereignty, not immigration, was the key motivation […]

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The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design

The Brexit referendum question was flawed in its design by ignoring Kenneth Arrow’s impossibility theorem, writes Thomas Colignatus. As he explains, referendums can be considered democratically legitimate only if voters can make an informed decision. and it is questionable whether the UK’s referendum on the EU produced a sound choice in the first place.  

Theresa May’s government, with support from […]

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    How has Brexit, and other EU crises, affected party Euroscepticism across Europe?

How has Brexit, and other EU crises, affected party Euroscepticism across Europe?

Analysing the results of a new expert survey, Aleks Szczerbiak and Paul Taggart write that Brexit has so far had a very limited impact on national party politics across Europe beyond the UK, particularly compared with the earlier Eurozone and migration crisis. While the longer-term, dynamic effects of Brexit on party Euroscepticism might be greater and there are a […]

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    Delusions and meddling: 30 years of Tory Euroscepticism are coming to the fore

Delusions and meddling: 30 years of Tory Euroscepticism are coming to the fore

The Conservative party’s relationship with the EU has come a long way since Edward Heath urged the UK to be ‘inside Europe’. Euroscepticism has a long history in the party, but the drift of public, media and Tory sentiment away from European unity crystallised in 1988 under Margaret Thatcher. The Brexit process is now bringing these tensions to the fore, […]

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    Not getting any easier: EU parliaments may yet get to vote on Brexit terms

Not getting any easier: EU parliaments may yet get to vote on Brexit terms

While the power of national parliaments in the European Union has generally been increased over the last two decades, as means of democratising the EU, their involvement in the Brexit process will further complicate the negotiations and prove difficult for the the next British government to handle, writes Julian M Hörner.

Hungary’s parliament building, Budapest. Credits: Godot 13 (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Amidst the triggering of Article […]

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