Blog

  • Permalink Gallery

    What does Trump’s war on the media mean for the future of political journalism?

What does Trump’s war on the media mean for the future of political journalism?

Donald Trump has been highly critical of the American media since taking office as President. George Kassimeris suggests that the media establishment were partly responsible for this reaction given their critical coverage of Trump’s campaign, but that the President’s continued attacks on the media are now a core part of his survival strategy.

The on-going toxic vendetta between President Trump […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Air quality at risk: Brexit and lobbying from member states could stall progress on reducing pollution

Air quality at risk: Brexit and lobbying from member states could stall progress on reducing pollution

Air pollution is linked to thousands of premature deaths across Europe each year and the European Union has a key role in addressing the problem. Roy M. Harrison states that although much progress has been made in improving air quality, lobbying from member states has led to a notable weakening of the resolve of the Commission to propose a […]

Print Friendly
Share

Don’t give up on Europe as an investment destination

Politically, the year 2017 looks like a minefield for Europe. Economically, however, the situation is much more promising: growth and inflation continue to accelerate and in the latest indices of economic surprises Europe has been faring better than the US, writes Alberto Gallo. ECB stimulus is starting to work, unemployment is slowly falling and consumer confidence is rising.

“Europe is […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Is EU free movement a curse or a blessing? The case of Austria

Is EU free movement a curse or a blessing? The case of Austria

Austria’s government has recently raised the prospect of altering employment rules to ensure workers already in the country are given priority for new jobs over workers in other EU states. Paul Schmidt writes that while immigration to Austria has risen rapidly over the last decade, the country still benefits from free movement, and increasing economic convergence within the EU […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    The integration of Bosnian refugees: An encouraging story that provides lessons for the current migration crisis

The integration of Bosnian refugees: An encouraging story that provides lessons for the current migration crisis

The migration crisis has posed a number of challenges for European countries, but what lessons can be learned from previous experiences with large scale migration? Mikkel Barslund, Matthias Busse, Karolien Lenaerts, Lars Ludolph and Vilde Renman present evidence from a study of the integration of Bosnian refugees in Europe following the Balkan wars in the 1990s. They find that with […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Podemos: Is a maverick leftist party mutating into the standard bearer of devolution?

Podemos: Is a maverick leftist party mutating into the standard bearer of devolution?

Pablo Iglesias reasserted his leadership over Podemos in a vote in early February, following a period of tension within the party between Iglesias and Iñigo Errejón. Juan Rodríguez-Teruel, Astrid Barrio and Oscar Barberà track the party’s development, writing that the schism between Iglesias and Errejón reflects just one of the fault-lines over Podemos’ development. They highlight the role of […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Populist Radical Right: A Reader edited by Cas Mudde

Book Review: The Populist Radical Right: A Reader edited by Cas Mudde

With The Populist Radical Right: A Reader, editor Cas Mudde brings together seminal social science scholarship on the radical or extreme right in Western democracies produced between the early 1990s to the present day. With a wealth of information that will be of particular use to scholars and students beginning research in this field, the volume will leave readers […]

Print Friendly
Share

Youth unemployment produces multiple scarring effects

It is clear that youth unemployment leads to many negative outcomes in terms of both material and mental wellbeing. Here, Ronald McQuaid summarises the multiple scarring effects of youth unemployment. Current high levels of youth unemployment will therefore be felt by society for decades, making effective policy responses incredibly important. 
Being unemployed when young leads to a higher likelihood of long-term ‘scarring’ in later […]

Print Friendly
Share

How your sexual orientation affects your salary in the UK

Research concerning labour market discrimination based on sexual orientation has yielded varying outcomes so far. Studies were usually based on small on unrepresentative samples. Drawing on a large and previously unavailable dataset, Cevat Giray Aksoy, Christopher S. Carpenter and Jefferson Frank find that gay men earn less than straight ones and heterosexual women earn less than lesbians.

Credits: Stanley Dai, under […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Mrs Lucretia’s protest: A story of identity and politics on the streets of Bucharest

Mrs Lucretia’s protest: A story of identity and politics on the streets of Bucharest

Protests have continued in Romania despite the government agreeing to withdraw a controversial piece of legislation that would have weakened the country’s anti-corruption laws. Diana Popescu writes that while media coverage has tended to portray the protests as a popular show of unity against the government, the situation is more complex in reality. She highlights the story of one […]

Print Friendly
Share

Italy’s struggle with the euro straitjacket

Paolo Gentiloni took over from Matteo Renzi as Italian Prime Minister in December, but the country’s politics remain volatile amid infighting within Renzi’s Democratic Party and calls from the Five Star Movement for a referendum on Italy leaving the euro. Miguel Otero-Iglesias highlights the widespread anger some voters feel toward the EU and Germany, but suggests that even if Grillo […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    ‘Straight outta Würselen’ and straight into the German Chancellery? Martin Schulz and the SPD’s resurgence

‘Straight outta Würselen’ and straight into the German Chancellery? Martin Schulz and the SPD’s resurgence

Since nominating Martin Schulz as the party’s candidate for German Chancellor, the SPD has experienced an upsurge in support that seemed unthinkable only a few weeks ago. Julian Göpffarth asks what lies behind the shift in support and whether Angela Merkel should now have serious concerns over her attempt to secure re-election.

Martin Schulz. Credits: Mettmann (CC BY 3.0)
When Martin […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Serbian presidential election 2017: Can Vučić pull a Putin-Medvedev?

Serbian presidential election 2017: Can Vučić pull a Putin-Medvedev?

Serbia’s ruling party, the SNS, has announced that their candidate at this spring’s presidential election will be none other than the Prime Minister himself – Aleksandar Vučić. Will the bold move allow the SNS to keep their hold on power? Tena Prelec outlines the scenarios, taking stock of the controversies that have accompanied Serbian politics over the past year.

The presidential election due to […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Credit: <a href=Tobias Higbie (CC-BY-SA-2.0)" />Gallery

    Upwards convergence: Why wage growth should be a priority for central and eastern Europe

Upwards convergence: Why wage growth should be a priority for central and eastern Europe

Wages vary significantly across European countries, but would increasing wages to create more convergence in pay levels have a damaging impact on competitiveness? Drawing on the examples of the Czech Republic, Germany and Romania, Martin Myant argues that there is scope for raising wages in central and eastern European countries to draw closer to western European levels without generating […]

Print Friendly
Share

Tackling Populism: the 89ers and the battle for the future

The Global Financial Crisis of 2008 caught economists by surprise – but not historians, writes Michael Cottakis. As many rushed to convey throughout the 2000s, the excessive risk-taking by banks in key sectors bore worrying resemblance to trends exhibited in the build-up to the 1929 Wall Street Crash. The information was available for those willing to listen. Yet bankers […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Mastering Trump’s mastermind: Sebastian Gorka and the struggle between Islam and the West

Mastering Trump’s mastermind: Sebastian Gorka and the struggle between Islam and the West

British-born Sebastian Gorka was appointed as Deputy Assistant to the President of the United States by Donald Trump in January and is viewed as one of the key figures behind the President’s national security strategy. Steve Fuller presents an analysis of Gorka’s world-view, writing that his conception of an ideological struggle between Islamic jihadism and the West may ultimately […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    In defence of polls: A few high profile misses shouldn’t overshadow the many times pollsters called it right

In defence of polls: A few high profile misses shouldn’t overshadow the many times pollsters called it right

Polling companies were heavily criticised for failing to predict the results of the UK’s EU referendum and Donald Trump’s presidential election victory, but is this criticism fair? Abel Bojar draws on evidence from recent European elections to illustrate that opinion polls have a far better record of success than they’re given credit for.

Some professions are dealt a bad hand […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Socrates Tenured: The Institutions of 21st-Century Philosophy by Robert Frodeman and Adam Briggle

Book Review: Socrates Tenured: The Institutions of 21st-Century Philosophy by Robert Frodeman and Adam Briggle

In Socrates Tenured: The Institutions of 21st-Century Philosophy, Robert Frodeman and Adam Briggle offer a diagnosis and remedy for the malaise currently gripping the study of philosophy, advocating a ‘field philosophy’ that aims to break free of the strictures of its disciplinary and departmental settings that have led to accusations of insularity and irrelevance. While suggesting that the authors’ claims are […]

Print Friendly
Share
February 12th, 2017|Book Reviews, featured|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    From Brexit to the pensions crisis, how did the Baby Boomers get the blame for everything?

From Brexit to the pensions crisis, how did the Baby Boomers get the blame for everything?

Baby Boomers – those who are currently between 50 and 70 years old – are often blamed by younger generations for many issues, from those associated with pensions and healthcare, to the unaffordability of housing, and even the vote to leave the EU. Jennie Bristow outlines the discourse and explains its implications.
Amidst the raw outrage that followed the EU […]

Print Friendly
Share
  • Permalink Gallery

    What is new and what is nationalist about Europe’s ‘new nationalism’?

What is new and what is nationalist about Europe’s ‘new nationalism’?

The success of several new parties with a broadly nationalist agenda has prompted some authors to speak of the rise of a ‘new nationalism’ in European politics. But what is new and what is nationalist about Europe’s ‘new nationalism’? Daphne Halikiopoulou argues that while the rhetoric of these parties is indeed centred on nationalism, the drivers of support are […]

Print Friendly
Share