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    Had austerity not happened, Leave support could have been up to 10% lower

Had austerity not happened, Leave support could have been up to 10% lower

The UK’s coalition government, which entered power in 2010, adopted a policy of spending cuts in the aftermath of the financial crisis. As Thiemo Fetzer writes, the resulting ‘austerity shock’ had a clear political impact, with districts that received the average austerity shock seeing increased shares for UKIP compared to districts with little exposure to austerity. He argues that the tight […]

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    Heading into the mainstream? Reviewing a year of the AfD in the German parliament

Heading into the mainstream? Reviewing a year of the AfD in the German parliament

Almost one year has passed since the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) was elected to the Bundestag in the 2017 German federal elections. Julian Göpffarth looks back on what has happened since, and how events have shaped both the AfD and German society.

Media coverage in Germany has been dominated in recent days by far-right violence in the city of Chemnitz. […]

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How interest groups influence public opinion

Interest groups have a role in shaping public opinion across Europe, but does an interest group’s reputation affect its ability to influence the views of the public? Drawing on evidence from two survey experiments, Andreas Dür explains that interest groups only appear to matter due to the arguments they put forward, with the reputations of particular groups having a surprisingly […]

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    How the rise of the Swedish radical right changed the most stable party system in Europe

How the rise of the Swedish radical right changed the most stable party system in Europe

The Swedish party system has long been regarded as one of the most stable in Western Europe. However, as Nicholas Aylott and Niklas Bolin write, the growth in support for the radical right Sweden Democrats ahead of the Swedish general election on 9 September represents a major challenge to the country’s two traditional political blocs. While the SD may […]

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Book Review: For a Left Populism by Chantal Mouffe

In For a Left Populism, Chantal Mouffe argues that our contemporary ‘populist moment’ represents an opportunity for democratic reinvigoration through the formation of a left populism in the name of radical democracy. The book marks an important intervention, most especially in its work on the political role of affect, finds Matthew Longo, but he remains unconvinced as to whether Mouffe’s vision of agonistic contestation will […]

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    A French dilemma: Environmental leadership vs environment-damaging economic growth

A French dilemma: Environmental leadership vs environment-damaging economic growth

France has attempted to take a leading role in global efforts to tackle climate change, but as Muhammad Shahbaz, Muhammad Ali Nasir and David Roubaud write, this has come at a time when France’s economic growth and outlook have been anaemic. They highlight that it is important to recognise the factors that contribute to environmental degradation, but also to […]

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    Romania’s protests and the PSD: Understanding the deep malaise that now exists in Romanian society

Romania’s protests and the PSD: Understanding the deep malaise that now exists in Romanian society

Anti-government protests in Romania have made international headlines, with over 400 people left injured following clashes between protesters and police on 10 August. Dennis Deletant writes that the protests are a symptom of a growing malaise in Romanian society fostered by the ruling Social Democrats that is estranging the citizen from the state.

Massive anti-government protests, held in Bucharest and […]

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    Will Germans rise up for a new left-wing movement? What to know about Aufstehen

Will Germans rise up for a new left-wing movement? What to know about Aufstehen

Facing the rise of the radical right AfD, some key left-wing figures in Germany have initiated ‘Aufstehen’, a new self-proclaimed movement which will officially be launched on 4 September. Manès Weisskircher discusses the players behind Aufstehen, their goals, and the movement’s future prospects.

In Germany, as elsewhere in Europe, left-wing political players are in a dire state. At the beginning […]

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    Kosovo and Serbia: A dangerous but not unprecedented Balkan land swap

Kosovo and Serbia: A dangerous but not unprecedented Balkan land swap

Kosovo and Serbia have recently discussed an exchange of territory, with some commentators suggesting a deal on a ‘land swap’ might be imminent. Andrea Lorenzo Capussela writes that while critics have rightly decried the plan as a redrawing of borders along ethnic lines, they neglect the fact that Kosovo itself is the product of a unilateral, ethnicity-based partition. He […]

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Sweden’s election is about more than the Sweden Democrats

Sweden will hold a general election on 9 September, alongside regional and municipal elections. Anders Hellström assesses the campaign so far, which has focused to a large extent on support for the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats. He suggests that the framing of the campaign around the policies of the Sweden Democrats, coupled with the other parties’ lack of a positive, […]

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    Does Ireland suffer from ‘metrophobia’? Examining the case of Dublin

Does Ireland suffer from ‘metrophobia’? Examining the case of Dublin

There has been a tendency in recent decades to strengthen institutions of metropolitan governance and planning in European cities, with large cities like London and Paris being viewed as primary drivers of economic growth. John Tomaney and Niamh Moore-Cherry highlight that one notable exception to this trend is Ireland and the city of Dublin. They explain that although Dublin […]

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    Book Review: Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey by Begüm Adalet

Book Review: Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey by Begüm Adalet

In Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey, Begüm Adalet offers an account of the historical construction of the ‘Turkish Model’ as a manufactured product of American Cold War policy juxtaposed with Turkish domestic politics. Exploring the conceptualisation and execution of modernisation through examples of survey research, infrastructure and architecture, this is a valuable study of the politics of […]

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The EU can’t remain silent over Romania’s protests

Over 400 people were left injured on 10 August after clashes between protesters and police in Romania. Bianca Toma and Alexandru Damian explain the origins of the protests, which emerged in opposition to attempts by the government to weaken anti-corruption measures. They argue that the EU’s response has been insufficient given the importance of tackling corruption in the country […]

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    UK financial power after Brexit: Understanding the country’s external balance sheets

UK financial power after Brexit: Understanding the country’s external balance sheets

Mona Ali argues that the UK’s financial position is reflected in its ‘balance of payment’ dynamics. Here she compares the UK’s external balance sheets with those of the US, and explores the potential implications of Brexit for the country’s politico-economic future. She explains why Brexit is likely to leave the economy adrift for quite some time.

Few nations have been […]

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    A lack of critical public debate: Questioning the EU’s support for the Southern Gas Corridor

A lack of critical public debate: Questioning the EU’s support for the Southern Gas Corridor

The Southern Gas Corridor is an initiative put forward by the European Commission to transport natural gas from the Caspian Sea to Southeastern Europe and Italy. As Marco Siddi writes, the project raises several important economic, security, ethical and ecological concerns. He argues that these issues have not been properly debated at the European level, and that cheaper and […]

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    A response to Steve Fuller: The differences between social democracy and neoliberalism

A response to Steve Fuller: The differences between social democracy and neoliberalism

In a recent EUROPP article, Steve Fuller argued that social democracy and neoliberalism may have more in common than we think. In a response to Fuller’s article, Johan Söderberg writes that if it appears there are no important distinctions to be made between neoliberalism and social democracy, then this is only because of a tendency to look through the […]

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    No deal, no trucks? What a ‘no deal’ Brexit will mean for road transport

No deal, no trucks? What a ‘no deal’ Brexit will mean for road transport

What will a ‘no deal’ Brexit mean for road transport? Dmitry Grozoubinski explains that come 30 March 2019, UK firms may not be able to transport goods between European Union countries. This means that many British lorry drivers will not be able to work in the EU, and many UK firms will urgently need to become permanently established somewhere in the EU to operate across […]

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    Book Review: Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment by Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease

Book Review: Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment by Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease

In Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment, Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease delve into the hypocrisies and failings of international justice projects. Their book offers a timely reminder that the current international justice regime has not offered a silver bullet for complex political problems, writes Teemu Laulainen.
Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment. Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease. Polity Press. […]

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    Generation wars over Brexit and beyond: How young and old are divided over social values

Generation wars over Brexit and beyond: How young and old are divided over social values

Pippa Norris explains how generation gaps divide the British electorate and mainstream parties. She writes that while the EU referendum was a prime example of how these divisions play out in the UK, the changing nature of electoral cleavages raises important questions about politics and party competition in western democracies more generally.

The Brexit decision shocked Britain’s image of itself, […]

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    A land swap between Kosovo and Serbia would be deeply problematic – and potentially dangerous

A land swap between Kosovo and Serbia would be deeply problematic – and potentially dangerous

There has been speculation in recent weeks that the leaders of Kosovo and Serbia have explored the option of a land swap, with some predominantly ethnic-Albanian areas of Serbia being traded for Serbian majority areas in Kosovo. Michael Rossi argues that an exchange of territory would do little for the Serbian or Albanian communities involved and could pose a […]

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