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    Five minutes with Eva Aldea: “A ‘Fortress Europe’ accessible only to those within would be as much of a failure of the European project as dissolution of the Union”

Five minutes with Eva Aldea: “A ‘Fortress Europe’ accessible only to those within would be as much of a failure of the European project as dissolution of the Union”

Can philosophy offer practical solutions to some of the key issues faced by the European Union? In an interview with EUROPP’s editor Stuart Brown, Eva Aldea discusses the role of philosophy in framing debates around immigration within Europe, Deleuze’s distinction between ‘migrants’ and ‘nomads’, and the potential for the EU to change how we think about nation states and […]

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It is far from certain that joining the Eurasian Customs Union would offer Ukraine the kind of benefits being predicted by Russia

Last month, Ukraine opted against signing an Association Agreement with the EU at the Eastern Partnership summit in Vilnius. As Rilka Dragneva and Kataryna Wolczuk write, Ukraine’s decision has raised the possibility of the country joining the Customs Union between Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus as an alternative to closer ties with the EU. Assessing the potential benefits the Customs Union […]

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Europe must adapt to the reality that we are living in a world increasingly dominated by Asia

Economic development in China and other Asian countries has an impact on the role of European states in global affairs. Craig J. Willy argues that with the rise of Asian economies, the world is increasingly moving away from the model of free trade championed by Europe and other states in the West. Unless Europe becomes a more cohesive actor which […]

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Book Review: The European Union in the G8: Promoting Consensus and Concerted Actions for Global Public Goods

The early 21st century can be defined by the depth of globalization and connections across continents. This level of integration also brings with it global problems, such as terrorism and the international financial crisis. The European Union in the G8: Promoting Consensus and Concerted Actions for Global Public Goods examines the relationship between two of the most important players in […]

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A Eurozone-wide IMF programme could save both

In past decades, the International Monetary Fund has had a potent reputation, especially in the developing world. In its programmes in Europe, however, the IMF has had to take a back seat to the desires of the European Commission and the European Central Bank, whose policies have thus far been less than successful. In light of this, Sony Kapoor makes […]

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‘Brexit’ talk is already hurting the UK economy

David Cameron has promised to hold a referendum on Britain’s EU membership in 2017. Costas Milas argues that talk of an exit from the EU has been a hugely unnecessary distraction that has led to economic uncertainty and higher borrowing costs. He shows this by plotting the 10-year UK yield together with the Google trends search queries index for “Brexit”. Policymakers […]

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Greece’s increasingly polarised and fragmented party system is at odds with the country’s international position.

Last month, the Democratic Left party left Greece’s coalition government, leaving PASOK and New Democracy with a razor-thin majority and the expectation of fresh elections for the country. Nikitas Konstantinidis argues that Greece’s political system has become much more fragmented in the wake of the crisis, with voters also now paying more attention to populist promises than parties’ ability to […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 29 June – 5 July: Croatia joins the EU, trouble in Portugal and France’s ‘restive left’.

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging.  The EU centre and the crisis  On Monday, the Portuguese Finance Minister, Vitor Gaspar, resigned, to the surprise of many – though Open Europe says that the recent signals showing his resignation was imminent had been fairly plain. Lost in EUrope says that the resignation is part of the eurozone’s […]

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The EU’s incremental adjustments to the eurocrisis may not be enough to meet the coming challenges to its governance and democratic legitimacy.

Since the beginning of the eurozone debt crisis three years ago, the member states have been forced to change the governance of the eurozone in a long period of crisis management. Daniela Schwarzer looks over the major changes to the EU’s governance structure, arguing that the European Council, Germany, and the European Central Bank have moved to the centre stage, […]

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Book Review: Representing Europeans: A Pragmatic Approach

In Representing Europeans, Richard Rose discusses the ways in which Europe’s institutions do and do not represent its citizens, arguing that more European integration is not the solution for all of Europe’s problems. With chapters on referendums, representation and interdependence, Nathalie Brack recommends this book to academics and students, but also to journalists looking for an interesting, critical and concise book on representation […]

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The European Commission is stronger and better equipped to meet Europe’s challenges than is often thought.

Hussein Kassim presents findings from a new book that reveals the inner workings of one of the world’s most powerful international administrations. Examining the backgrounds and beliefs of officials, and how the organisation has changed over the past decade, he argues that the European Commission is stronger and better equipped to meet the challenges that confront the European Union than […]

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Falling support for the European Parliament, not the economic crisis, has led to a decline in support for the EU in Spain and Portugal.

In April, a major Eurobarometer study reported that there had been a decline in support for the European Union across Europe, especially in countries where the Eurozone crisis’ effects had been most severe. Mariano Torcal takes a closer look at the reasons behind falling support for the EU in Spain and Portugal. Using panel data, he finds that a significant […]

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Book Review: The Passage to Europe

Given the current economic crisis, and questions about the legitimacy of the European Union, what is the future of European integration? As the EU faces its most serious economic and political test, Luuk Van Middelaar’s account of its history asks us to reconsider the forces that underpin the EU, hold it together and drive it forward. Renaud Thillaye finds that […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 15 – 21 June: Obama in Germany, Merkel’s manifesto, and a fiery letter from Cyprus

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging.  The EU centre and the crisis  The New Federalist has a discussion with Bruno Selun, the secretary of the European Parliament intergroup on LGBT rights. Made up of 153 MEPs from 22 member states, the group seeks to reinforce and safeguard the human rights of LGBT people, and provides information […]

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The latest agreement on the governance of the Schengen border control regime simply revamps old rules and changes little on the ground.

Concerned by growing migratory pressures on Europe’s external borders, some EU member states have called for a revision of the rules regarding the imposition of national border controls within the EU. Ruben Zaiotti examines the recent agreement on the governance of the Schengen border control regime, which aims to clarify how these controls might operate. He argues that the agreement […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 8 – 14 June: Turkey’s protests continue, Hollande declares crisis over, and Iceland suspends EU negotiations.

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging.  The EU centre and the crisis The weekend sees French President Francois Hollande declare the eurozone crisis to now be over. Lost in EUrope is worried about the statement, saying that it is wishful thinking given the economic realities in France and elsewhere. Meanwhile, Craig Willy has a summary of […]

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Designing a new UK-EU relationship and how it could be achieved

The Eurozone crisis has brought the EU’s division into two types of membership into relief, with the euro member states moving closer towards deeper fiscal and economic union, and the others, such as the UK, who remain in the single market with no wish to join the Eurozone, at risk of becoming ‘second class’ states. Damian Chalmers, Simon Hix and […]

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Despite their trade row, China and the EU face similar challenges to energy security and conservation.

The recent trade dispute over solar panels shows the fraught relations between China and the EU over energy. Justine Doody writes that the current quarrel could pit the two against each other in a wider struggle. For now, technical rather than political cooperation seems the most both sides can hope for.  The EU announced at the beginning of June that […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 1 – 7 June: IMF admits mistakes in Greek bailout, Brussels vs Brussels, and a red card for EU legislation?

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging. The EU centre and the crisis One of the main stories this week is the IMF’s admission that it made mistakes in the way that it and its Troika partners of the EU and European Central Bank (ECB) carried out Greece’s first bailout in 2010. The European Commission strongly disagreed […]

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Brussels blog round-up for 25 – 31 May: Commissioners in trouble, UK challenged over migrants’ benefits, and should the EU get rid of its small change?

Chris Gilson takes a look at the week in Brussels blogging. The EU centre and the crisis This week, the European Commission announced that some eurozone members would be given more time to get their deficits under control, for example, France will get two extra years, according to Coulisses de Bruxelles. Open Europe says that the plans are much of the […]

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