Monthly Archives: February 2012

Gender Folding and Pre-teen Kissing

Are ‘homonormative’ narratives, full of labels for identities, becoming as rigid as heteronormative narratives? Maitrayee Basu questions the need for naming relations and argues that the fluidity of desires and identities leads to a better expression of self. This article has been published collaboratively by LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings blogs to mark LGBT History Month.

 

I kissed a […]

February 29th, 2012|Society|0 Comments|

Women’s Soccer in Crisis – A Voice from the Pitch

In this post Caitlin Fisher talks about the treatment of women’s soccer in the United States as compared to men’s soccer and makes an argument that perhaps we should stop holding it in comparison with men’s soccer and see it as a different interpretation of an old sport. The year 2012 has started out on a bleak note for women’s football. […]

February 23rd, 2012|Arts & Culture|3 Comments|

“That’s Gay!” – Think before you speak

Benjamin Butterworth speaks out against the callous use of the phrase ‘That’s gay!” He argues that language reflects and forms attitudes, so should be carefully used. This article has been published collaboratively by LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings blogs to mark LGBT History Month.   “That’s gay!” This is the call heard in school playgrounds up and down the […]

February 21st, 2012|Society|1 Comment|

Playing it Metro

Emma Spruce on ‘Playing it Straight’ -the dynamics of articulating sexuality in popular culture. Metro-sexuality as a challenge to hyper-masculinity? This article has been published collaboratively by LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings blog to mark LGBT History Month. This week saw another Thursday night at home, hiding from the weather and reassuring myself that there wasn’t a rule that meant it would stay freezing outside until […]

February 20th, 2012|Arts & Culture, Society|0 Comments|

Now You See Her, Now You Don’t: U.S. Women and the Current Battle Over Contraception

In this post, LSE MSc Gender, Media, and Culture student Kimberly Killen reviews the current debate over contraception in the U.S.A. and asks, ‘Where are the women?” Something funny is happening in the USA. In the past few months, and especially the last couple of weeks, women’s health issues have re-emerged in the political realm with renewed passion and vitriol. However, […]

February 17th, 2012|Politics|3 Comments|

The Transmen Community is Still Overshadowed by Phallocentric Logic in Malaysia

Alicia Izharuddin asks why the transmen community in Malaysia is regularly marginalised and continues to be poorly understood even within liberal and activist circles. This article has been published collaboratively by LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings blog to mark LGBT History Month. In several scenes from the recent but quickly forgotten Malaysian film, ‘Aku Bukan Tomboy’ (I’m Not a […]

The Freedom of Religious Oppression?

Linnéa Sandström discusses the ways in which religion and reproductive health collide in current US political discourse and questions the paradoxical relationship between the freedom of religious multiplicity and the right of women to control their reproductive capacities.      For the past few decades in the US, reproductive health policies have taken up a large proportion of the nation’s political […]

February 13th, 2012|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

The Pains of Rendering The Iron Lady ‘Palatable’

  In this post, LSE MSc Gender, Media, & Culture student Kimberly Killen explores her reaction to the film The Iron Lady. She looks at how the film portrays a woman in power and the problems that arise therein.   Let me get this out of the way: Meryl Streep is great in the film The Iron Lady. That’s not […]

Accessibility at the Go Feminist Conference

This past weekend, Amanda Conroy and Linnea Sandström, members of the Engenderings editorial collective, set up a stall at the Go Feminist conference held in London. This is what they got out of the experience.     Immediately upon arriving to the Go Feminist conference, it seemed different to other conferences; there were women transcribing what was being said by […]

February 7th, 2012|Society|3 Comments|

One Gay Day: Heteronormativity in Action

Emma Spruce, a PhD student at the Gender Institute, writes a witty critique of how heteronormativity functions in everyday interactions and how labeling from outside and within the LGBTQI community inhibits identity formation, recognition, and social change. This article has been published collaboratively with LSE Equality and Diversity and LSE Engenderings Blog to mark LGBT History Month. I let the […]

February 5th, 2012|Politics, Society|0 Comments|

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