Development

Why repealing the tampon tax is not enough

 

 

Many women in poverty still can’t buy pads or tampon

In the last couple of years, countries from Canada to the UK have made headlines for abolishing the tampon tax. But for many low-income women – whether in Western metropolises or sub-Saharan Africa – savings of several cents do not tackle the real problem: these products can be unaffordable altogether.

Almost two-thirds […]

New Handbook on Gender and the Military

By Claire Duncanson and Rachel Woodward

 

Gender issues in the military have hit the headlines this summer. Whether it’s the celebrations of one hundred years of women in the British military, President Trump’s ban on transgender personnel serving in the US military, or the ‘cultural wars’ – or lack thereof – over the absence of diversity in the big movie […]

Mothers, bombs, and a whole lot of gender clichés

After the US dropped one of the biggest explosives ever used in Afghanistan earlier this year, critics objected to the use of the name ‘mother of all bombs.’ In this blog post, Jennifer Philippa Eggert analyses the gendered assumptions underlying the criticisms of the bomb’s name, before critically discussing the roles of mothers in violent political movements and counterextremism […]

Where is the $2 billion for Indian mothers?

by Swati Narayan

Babloo is too short for his age. In India, and especially in the poor eastern state of Bihar, that is unfortunately not unusual. Two of every five pre-school children are stunted. But Babloo’s malnutrition is so severe that he can barely move and lies on his back all day. With three other children in tow, his mother, […]

  • Permalink Awa or Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) processing. Image credits to the author. Gallery

    Practicing Decoloniality 3/3: Decolonizing Dilemmas with a “z”

Practicing Decoloniality 3/3: Decolonizing Dilemmas with a “z”

On Wednesday 22nd February 2017, PhD students at the Gender Institute organised a roundtable discussion and interactive workshop titled Practicing Decoloniality in Gender Studies. This short series of posts presents the transcripts of the three speakers’ discussion papers, concluding today with Amanda Shaw’s reflections on decolonizing dilemmas.

My research concerns gendered labour within food systems in Hawaiʻi. How did a […]

Practicing Decoloniality 1/3: Decolonial Discomforts

On Wednesday 22nd February 2017, PhD students at the Gender Institute organised a roundtable discussion and interactive workshop titled Practicing Decoloniality in Gender Studies. This short series of posts presents the transcripts of the three speakers’ discussion papers, kicking off with Priya Raghavan’s reflections on her encounters with decoloniality in the neoliberal academy during her first year of PhD […]

Engendering India’s Burgeoning Cities

by Vidisha Mishra 

Image credits to: India.com
While cities have always been designed for men, urban development is treated as a gender-neutral domain. In October, representatives from 195 countries participated in the Habitat III Conference and adopted the New Urban Agenda (NUA) on sustainable cities and human settlements. The conference was particularly significant this year as it finally addressed the much-ignored gender […]

  • Aerial photo of Damascus
    Permalink Photo Credit Marcus LyonGallery

    Why do women join IS? A critique of gendered assumptions about women’s motivations

Why do women join IS? A critique of gendered assumptions about women’s motivations

by Jennifer Philippa Eggert

Women who join the so-called ‘Islamic State’ (IS) in Syria have garnered considerable public interest in Europe since the summer of 2014, when first reports about women leaving Europe for IS-controlled territory emerged. In this blog post, Jennifer Philippa Eggert contrasts commonly held assumptions about women’s motivations to join IS with what recent research tells us about […]

Measuring women’s work—more vexing than you might think

By Naila Kabeer

Philanthropists Bill and Melinda Gates cited “time poverty” as a top priority in their 2016 Annual Letter, referring to the unpaid work that disproportionately falls on women and shining a spotlight on one of the most vexing challenges economists and statisticians face: how to accurately measure women’s work.

New choruses demanding a data revolution to gauge progress toward the […]

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    Permalink Two of the new ‘Professors in Practice’, doing the thing that presumably got them the gig. Image credit Wikimedia Commons CC-BY-2.0.Gallery

    A measured response to criticisms of the LSE’s new appointments

A measured response to criticisms of the LSE’s new appointments

by Laura J. Shepherd   By way of homage to xkcd: This blog contains strong language, which may be unsuitable for children, and evidence-based arguments, which may be unsuitable for Trump supporters. Oh, and also, for those who care about these things: I am most definitely posting this in an independent capacity. My views reflect the views of neither of the […]

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