Category Archives: Greek Society

May 29 2018

The #MeToo Movement and the Greek Silence

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By Katerina Glyniadaki Earlier this month, the verdict of the ‘wolf pack’ case sparked the #MeToo movement to spread across Spain. Both in the streets and on social media platforms, the court decision was met with uproar. According to the supporters … Continue reading

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Feb 19 2018

Turning Greece into an Education Hub

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By Jessie Voumvaki In the midst of a prolonged crisis, Greece urgently needs new growth drivers for its economy. Moreover, recent international research has identified that the negative impact of globalization on income distribution in advanced economies can be offset … Continue reading

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Feb 14 2018

Mobility of Highly-Skilled Individuals, Local Innovation and Entrepreneurship Activity

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In an open economy migration is a natural process. It certainly poses challenges for the host countries but also brings benefits, especially if skillful human capital is accumulated. High-skilled migrants bring advanced or “upper-tail” human capital (Mokyr, 2002; Squicciarini and … Continue reading

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Oct 25 2017

Populism, the state and modernisation in Greece: A historical perspective

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By Angelos Chryssogelos Since the eruption of the Greek crisis in 2010, few concepts have captured the attention of public and academic debates in Greece more than populism. In lay discourse, populism – understood often as irresponsible macroeconomics and demagogy … Continue reading

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Oct 19 2017

Gender-Change Law in Greece: Education, Ideology, and Reality

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By Katerina Glyniadaki, PhD Candidate at the European Institute, LSE  Why did suddenly a gender-change law become such a ‘hot’ topic in Greece?  The word ‘gender’ originates from the Greek language. Yet, there is no distinction between ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ … Continue reading

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Mar 9 2017

Beyond Crisis: Constitutional Change in Greece after the Memoranda

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By Anna Tsiftsoglou, NBG Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Hellenic Observatory Can financial crises bring constitutional change? Has Greece become a prominent such example? Already 7 years into recession, crisis-hit Greece is experiencing a tremendous institutional change. This change, which takes place … Continue reading

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Mar 1 2017

Religious Pluralism and Education in Greece

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By Effie Fokas and Margarita Markoviti In 2005, in Folgero v. Norway, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) set precedence highly relevant to the Greek context of religious education (RE):  ‘it does not appear that the respondent State [Norway] … Continue reading

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Feb 24 2017

Greek Healthcare Revisited: The Other Side of the Story

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By Vassilis G. Apostolopoulos It was with great interest that I read Guardian’s long op-ed “Patients who should live are dying’: Greece’s public health meltdown”. The article, correctly underlined the dramatic impact of prolonged ‘draconian’ austerity measures and policies which … Continue reading

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Jan 9 2017

Contrasting Greek and UK Youths’ Subjective Responses to Austerity: Lessons for other European countries

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By Athanasia Chalari and Clive Sealey Since 2010, many European countries have faced severe economic crises, resulting in the implementation of various forms of ‘austerity’ social policies, and Greece and the UK have been at the forefront of the implementation of such … Continue reading

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Dec 9 2016

Gender and the Greek crisis: towards a risk assessment

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By Antigone Lyberaki and Platon Tinios The Greek crisis is uniquely long and deep; while it is unfolding, secular trends in ageing, technology and globalization are changing the ways people work and how economics shapes attitudes. Add to this that … Continue reading

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