Long-term Care

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    What are the likely economic impacts of an ageing population on end of life care?

What are the likely economic impacts of an ageing population on end of life care?

by Matt Townsend

It is commonly understood that population ageing and the growing numbers of older people will place additional strain on all parts of the health and social care system. However, when it comes to health expenditure at the end of life, recent international evidence suggests that not all costs will increase equally, and some may proportionately lessen.

In a […]

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    The impact of postponement of reforms to long-term care financing in England

The impact of postponement of reforms to long-term care financing in England

by the CASPeR Study team

The delay in the introduction of a lifetime cap on spending on long-term care will result in single and widowed homeowners with modest incomes who need care now or in the near future having to use up twice as much of their capital to pay for their care.

With funding from the Nuffield Foundation we have […]

Social investment in long-term care

by Geoff Ellis

More people now reach an age where declining health make them dependent on help from others. Only a few EU countries provide extensive, publically financed care for these frail older people. In many countries, most care is provided on an unpaid, informal basis by family members, most of whom are women.

While rising life expectancy increases the need […]

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    Is access to long-term care services unequitable? The Spanish case

Is access to long-term care services unequitable? The Spanish case

by Pilar García-Gómez, Cristina Hernández-Quevedo, Dolores Jiménez-Rubio and Juan Oliva-Moreno

There are large differences in the way European countries organise their long-term care (LTC) system, as well as in their spending: while half of the EU-27 countries spent less than 1% of their Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on LTC in 2010, Nordic countries and the Netherlands spent more than 3% of […]

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    Thousands are missing out on palliative care because of unfair provision

Thousands are missing out on palliative care because of unfair provision

By Josie Dixon

A significant minority of people – at least a fifth of everyone who dies – are not receiving the palliative care they need. Our study on equity in palliative care, funded by Marie Curie, also found that some groups are less likely to receive this care than others.

We undertook a wide-ranging literature and evidence review, including looking […]

The 3rd International Conference on Evidence-based Policy in Long-term Care

We are living in a time when Long-term Care (LTC) has two major challenges: an ageing world population alongside increasing demands for LTC against decreasing budgets. The 3-day 2014 ILPN conference provided a timely opportunity to host academic and policy debates on these very challenges. PSSRU colleague and ILPN conference coordinator, Joanna Marczak, provides a brief summary of ILPN’s latest […]

November 3rd, 2014|Long-term Care|0 Comments|

Ageing at high speed. The Indo-UK ‘Ageing’ Workshop, Mumbai

Ageing is a global achievement that deserves to be celebrated. At the same time it is a phenomenon with human, social, health and economic implications that need to be understood. There are both opportunities and challenges arising from ageing, which need to be addressed. PSSRU’s Adelina Comas-Herrera reports from the Indo-UK “Ageing” Workshop in Mumbai. Last week’s workshop on Ageing was […]

January 24th, 2014|Long-term Care|2 Comments|

Services and support for people with early-onset dementia and their unpaid carers

by Margaret Perkins While dementia is usually associated with older people, it can affect younger people. If a diagnosis is made under age 65, this is referred to as so called early-onset or young-onset dementia. One estimate suggested that there were 15,000 younger people with dementia in the UK in 2007. This is likely to be a major underestimate by […]

Research into the UK government’s proposed reforms of the funding of care and support published

The cost implications of the UK government’s recent plans to reform the funding system for care and support in England are analysed in a new research paper, which also considers the effects of options to give more help to lower income care home residents. The paper, by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the University of […]

How can private long-term care insurance supplement state systems? AXA-funded study looking at the UK as a case study reports on 30 January 2013

by Laura Clohessy

An increasing amount of attention is being paid to the question of how we continue to finance care. With concerns about the ageing population and the cost of long-term care, to both the individual and state, we must rethink the way we deal with chronic illness and its disabling consequences. This includes consideration of both public and private […]

January 7th, 2013|Long-term Care|0 Comments|