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    How can blogging help research make an impact beyond academia? Illustrative examples from the LSE blogs

How can blogging help research make an impact beyond academia? Illustrative examples from the LSE blogs

Previous posts in our series on the Impact of LSE Blogs project examined the effects of blogging on the academic sphere, looking more closely at citations to the original research outputs and also to the blog posts themselves. But what about the effects of blogging beyond academia, on the public sphere? In the final post of the series, Kieran […]

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    How do LSE Blogs impact the academic sphere? Exploring the effects of blogging on published research

How do LSE Blogs impact the academic sphere? Exploring the effects of blogging on published research

In the second of a series of posts on the Impact of LSE Blogs project, Carlos Arrebola and Amy Mollett share the first findings of an LSE study that sought to examine the effects of blogging on the success of published articles. While the study proved to be more exploratory than explanatory, with the positive effects on citations particularly […]

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    Blogging platforms are not neutral: Challenging the underlying assumptions of our technology.

Blogging platforms are not neutral: Challenging the underlying assumptions of our technology.

As a farewell post on her last day working on the LSE Impact Blog, Sierra Williams reflects on her time as editor and her relationship with the platform. Drawing on Neil Postman’s critique of technology, she looks at some of the assumptions that underpin the blog and argues a bit of ‘technological modesty’ is required to get a better […]

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    An antidote to futility: Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously

An antidote to futility: Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously

Blogs are now an established part of the chattersphere/public conversation, especially in international development circles, but Duncan Green finds academic take-up lacking. Here he outlines the major arguments for taking blogging and social media seriously. It doesn’t need to become another onerous time-commitment. Reading a blog should be like listening to the person talk, but with links.

Before I started […]

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    Academic blogging in the “accelerated academy”: How to build a personal, professional and public community.

Academic blogging in the “accelerated academy”: How to build a personal, professional and public community.

As a dynamic space, a group blog can be particularly suited to the rapidly changing context of researcher development. Claire Aitchison, Susan Carter and Cally Guerin share their experiences developing a doctoral support blog, a global space for personal and professional development and for building community. Individuals and their institutions stand to benefit from blogging, they argue, but if it were to be mainstreamed, would the […]

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    Shorter, better, faster, free: Blogging changes the nature of academic research, not just how it is communicated

Shorter, better, faster, free: Blogging changes the nature of academic research, not just how it is communicated

Academic blogging gets your work and research out to a potentially massive audience at very, very low cost and relative amount of effort. Patrick Dunleavy argues blogging and tweeting from multi-author blogs especially is a great way to build knowledge of your work, to grow readership of useful articles and research reports, to build up citations, and to foster […]

Why do bloggers blog so much about blogging?

More than just the enthusiastic pronouncements of reaching wider audiences, Pat Thomson suspects that blogging has in many ways legitimated, promoted and extended an interest in the practice of academic writing itself. Blogs about blogging suggest that bloggers also find – and frequently point to – new forms of peer support and other academic opportunities generated through their blogging. This […]

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    Blogging can be a release from all the structural pressures corroding the creative impulse in academic writing.

Blogging can be a release from all the structural pressures corroding the creative impulse in academic writing.

Mark Carrigan untangles the mixture of creativity and routine when academics sit down to convey complex thoughts. Waiting for the organic moment of inspiration when deadlines loom can be unreliable. By making blogging his main vehicle for intellectual exploration, he was free to explore a form of creative expression that he found intensely liberating. Is consistent writing a matter of attentiveness to moments of inspiration […]

Continue the momentum of your research and explore wider areas of interest: our top five posts on Academic Blogging

For our final Top Five overview piece highlighting our most-read pieces of the last year, we present the top five blogs on the theme of academic blogging. These posts provide helpful advice for those looking to get more involved in the practice and also delve further into the pros and cons of investing time and energy into academic blogging. […]

Academic blogging is part of a complex online academic attention economy, leading to unprecedented readership.

Given the far-reaching attention of their paper on the nature of academic blogging, Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson find blogging is now part of a complex online ‘attention economy’ where social media can help your work travel further. But in this new world awash with academic papers, the signal to noise ratio is low. Will the highest quality papers be read […]

Impact Round-Up 7th December: Academic blogging under threat, statistical literacy, and sexism in science communication.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication. Earlier this week Chris Tyler and colleagues from the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (who have recently launched a new Social Science Section) put together a list of the top tips scientists need to know about policy-making, as a supplement […]

As academic blogging becomes mainstream, science communication must facilitate depth and breadth in online discourse.

Having recently attended a conference session on the role of online forums for science communication, Alan Cann reflects on the extent to which academic blogging is currently embedded in academic practice. Blogs are still the centre of serious online academic communication but there is still a long way to go until the Republic of Blogs is established and academic blogging moves […]

Accept no substitutes: blogging is a valuable supplement to scholarship and rightfully challenges the status quo

Weighing in on the much debated role of academic blogging in scholarship, Rohan Maitzen argues blogging is now recognised as a valuable part of the wider ecology of scholarship – not as a substitute of, but a supplement to professional activities. More consideration is needed on how different writing styles and outlets serve the profession and specific disciplines. Furthermore, senior faculty should […]

Formal academic conferences and informal blogging play complementary roles in the academic feedback cycle

Adam Crymble compares his experience presenting his research at an academic conference to his experiences of academic blogging. The formal, specialised nature of academic conferences offers the chance for invaluable targeted expert critique; however, blogging allows for a much more diverse, interdisciplinary audience, which is not to be sniffed at. Both outlets strengthen the structure of academic feedback and discourse. […]

The legitimacy and usefulness of academic blogging will shape how intellectualism develops

Academic blogging has become an increasingly popular form, but key questions still remain over whether blog posts should feature more prominently in formal academic discourse. Jenny Davis clarifies the pros and cons of blog citation and sees the remaining ambiguity as indicative of a changing professional landscape. The wider scholarly community must learn how to grapple with these ethical and professional questions […]

Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair?

The replicability and methodology of a paper published in a high-impact journal has prompted further discussion regarding scientific discourse and responsibility. Dorothy Bishop argues the journal editors should have done more to ensure the veracity of the findings before it was published. Furthermore, this case highlights the instrumental role of blogging for improving scientific discourse and peer-review.  ‘Post-publication peer review’ via the blogosphere […]

The boundaries of academic blogging

Alex Marsh thinks of himself as a blogger who is an academic, rather than an “academic blogger”. He finds that though there is significant overlap, these two identities are not entirely congruent. An academic blogger may feel constrained to topics only related to his or her academic research, whereas a blogger who is also an academic is free to explore wider fields […]

Future of Impacts: ‘How to’ guide to social media, podcasting, blogging and writing your REF impact case study

Missed our ‘How to’ sessions at the recent Future of Impacts conference? Never fear, our ‘How to’ social media, podcasting, blogging and impact case study guides are here. Listen to the Impact of Social Sciences team podcast and peruse the presentations. ‘How to’ podcast If you missed out on any of our breakout sessions from the Future of Impacts conference, catch up […]

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