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    Book Review: Evidence-Based Policy Making in the Social Sciences: Methods that Matter edited by Gerry Stoker and Mark Evans

Book Review: Evidence-Based Policy Making in the Social Sciences: Methods that Matter edited by Gerry Stoker and Mark Evans

In Evidence-Based Policy Making in the Social Sciences: Methods that Matter,editors Gerry Stoker and Mark Evans showcase tools through which to generate evidence-based policy insights. Released amidst discussions of a ‘post-truth’ era, this book is recommended to students looking to broaden their understanding of methods for providing meaningful evidence for policy creation, but leaves open the question of how social scientists […]

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Calling all LSE blogs authors – we need your help!

Here at the LSE blogs, we’re always eager to follow up on our published posts and track the impacts that they have; whether this is mainstream media coverage, inclusion on a university course reading list, references in grey literature or in policy documentation. Much of this can be captured by link-tracking but there are inevitably cases we can’t pick […]

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January 20th, 2017|Featured, Impact|0 Comments|
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    Interdisciplinary research may lead to increased visibility but also depresses scholarly productivity

Interdisciplinary research may lead to increased visibility but also depresses scholarly productivity

Interdisciplinarity has grown in recent years. But how does interdisciplinary research influence scholarship and scholarly careers? Erin Leahey’s research has found that while interdisciplinary research has its benefits, such as increased visibility as indicated by citations, it also comes at a cost, as it depresses scholarly productivity. Although peer review of interdisciplinary work is less of a problem than […]

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    “Remember a condition of academic writing is that we expose ourselves to critique” – 15 steps to revising journal articles

“Remember a condition of academic writing is that we expose ourselves to critique” – 15 steps to revising journal articles

Before having your paper accepted for publication in a peer reviewed journal you’ll almost certainly be required to revise your manuscript at least once. But for less experienced authors this may not always feel so straightforward. Deborah Lupton has compiled a list of quick tips for authors who have been asked to revise their article. Remember that being exposed […]

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    Mendeley reader counts offer early evidence of the scholarly impact of academic articles

Mendeley reader counts offer early evidence of the scholarly impact of academic articles

Although the use of citation counts as indicators of scholarly impact has well-documented limitations, it does offer insight into what articles are read and valued. However, one major disadvantage of citation counts is that they are slow to accumulate. Mike Thelwall has examined reader counts from Mendeley, the academic reference manager, and found them to be a useful source of […]

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    ‘Rubbing shoulders’: an understanding of networks, relationships and everyday practices is key to parliamentary engagement

‘Rubbing shoulders’: an understanding of networks, relationships and everyday practices is key to parliamentary engagement

Relationships and networks have a big impact on parliamentary engagement. Understanding these dynamics is crucial for those academics looking to work with Parliament as part of disseminating their research. Marc Geddes, Katharine Dommett and Brenton Prosser outline why academics must be able to ‘rub shoulders’ with parliamentary staff, building shared understandings and personal trust which can circumvent common barriers […]

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    Developing social science identities in interdisciplinary research and education

Developing social science identities in interdisciplinary research and education

While it is no longer uncommon for social scientists to be included in research groups tackling complex problems in the natural sciences, limited understanding of the different disciplinary areas within the social sciences remains a challenge. Eric Toman describes the approach social science faculties at his university have taken to address this and also outlines how graduate training programmes […]

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    Twitter can help with scientific dissemination but its influence on citation impact is less clear

Twitter can help with scientific dissemination but its influence on citation impact is less clear

Researchers have long been encouraged to use Twitter. But does researchers’ presence on Twitter influence citations to their papers? José Luis Ortega explored to what extent the participation of scholars on Twitter can influence the tweeting of their articles and found that although the relationship between tweets and citations is poor, actively participating on Twitter is a powerful way […]

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    Feedback helps increase the impact of academic research, even more so when coming from well-connected colleagues

Feedback helps increase the impact of academic research, even more so when coming from well-connected colleagues

Obtaining feedback and receiving constructive criticism improves academic research and increases its impact. This is especially true when that feedback is offered by colleagues who are particularly well-connected in a research field’s social network, according to the findings of a new study by Co-Pierre Georg and Michael E. Rose. Informal intellectual collaborations with well-connected colleagues can point authors to […]

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    Persistent identifiers – building trust and supporting openness in digital scholarship

Persistent identifiers – building trust and supporting openness in digital scholarship

The inevitable ambiguities arising from using names can hamper our ability to reliably and transparently discover, connect, and access resources. If we’re to fully realise the potential of open, digital scholarship then automatic, resolvable connections between researchers, institutions, research outputs and funders are essential. ORCID’s Josh Brown and Alice Meadows outline how persistent identifiers are able to make these […]

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2016 in review: round-up of our top posts on open access

Libraries and Open Journal Systems: Hosting and facilitating the creation of Open Access scholarship
There is a growing availability of free tools and software for academic publishing. How might libraries leverage existing platforms? Anna R. Craft describes one experience of an academic library hosting locally-produced open access journals through Open Journals Systems (OJS). But even “free” software is not without […]

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2016 in review: round-up of our top posts on big data

The Next Decade of Data Science: Rethinking key challenges faced by big data researchers
The vast availability of digital traces of unprecedented form and scale has led many to believe that we are entering a new data revolution. Will these new data sources and tools allow us to improve business processes in transformative ways? Vyacheslav Polonski argues that the more […]

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December 28th, 2016|Annual review, Big Data|0 Comments|
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    2016 in review: round-up of our top posts on academic writing

2016 in review: round-up of our top posts on academic writing

Five strategies to get your academic writing “unstuck”
To help fight off the January blues and to further inspire a productive year ahead, we have coordinated a series of posts on academic writing. To kick-start the series, here are some general tips from Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega on what to do when the words just aren’t flowing. From conceptual maps to […]

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    2016 in review: a selection of the top LSE Impact Blog posts of the year

2016 in review: a selection of the top LSE Impact Blog posts of the year

Continuing what is by now an established Impact Blog tradition, editor Kieran Booluck looks back at all that’s published over the last twelve months and shares a selection of the year’s top posts.

It’s been another record-breaking year at the Impact Blog! Last year was the first time we recorded in excess of one million pageviews in a single year, […]

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December 23rd, 2016|LSE Comment|0 Comments|
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    Plato and Aristotle plan a symposium: a surreal take on academic conferences

Plato and Aristotle plan a symposium: a surreal take on academic conferences

Neatly summarising the insights first outlined in his earlier posts examining the merits of contemporary academic conferences, Donald Nicolson imagines a conversation between Plato and Aristotle as the two great thinkers make plans for their forthcoming symposium.

As Plato and Aristotle wandered through the School of Athens, wondering what they could do to improve their upcoming symposium, they hit upon […]

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    The focus on better communicating certain ‘truths’ is misplaced: academics must improve their emotional literacy

The focus on better communicating certain ‘truths’ is misplaced: academics must improve their emotional literacy

Following the selection of ‘post-truth’ as the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2016, Ruth Dixon takes inspiration from artist Grayson Perry’s plea that academics should cultivate greater emotional understanding of those with whom they disagree. It’s time for political scientists to question, with some humility, their own ‘deficit model’ of the public understanding of politics.

In November, I attended […]

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    Measuring and engineering influence on social media: what does this mean for political power?

Measuring and engineering influence on social media: what does this mean for political power?

In 2016, the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump resolutely demonstrated the political power of social media. David Beer asks how we might better understand ‘influence’ in the machinations of social media, and how this influence might be harnessed by those in, or seeking, office.
One of the most interesting features of the new types of social media analytics […]

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December 19th, 2016|Big Data, Social Media|0 Comments|
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    Git for Data Analysis – why version control is essential for collaboration and for gaining public trust

Git for Data Analysis – why version control is essential for collaboration and for gaining public trust

Openness and collaboration go hand in hand. Samuel Payne describes how scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working with the Frictionless Data team at Open Knowledge International to ensure collaboration on data analysis is seamless and their data integrity is maintained.

I’m a computational biologist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where I work on environmental and biomedical […]

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    The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator

The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator

There remains something of a disconnect between how research librarians themselves see their role and its responsibilities and how these are viewed by their faculty colleagues. Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov imagine how the research librarian of the future might work, utilising new data science and digital skills to drive more collaborative and open scholarship. […]

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December 14th, 2016|Data science, Libraries|8 Comments|
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.