In this section you can read recent expert commentary from LSE academics on issues related to the impact of academic research. This section also contains reviews of recent books by LSE academics and book reviews from LSE staff and alumni.

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    How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps.

How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps.

You’ve just published a research article – why should you bother writing a blog post about it? Patrick Dunleavy argues that if you’ve devoted months to writing the paper, dealing with comments, doing rewrites and hacking through the publishing process, why would you not spend the extra couple of hours crafting an accessible blogpost? Here he breaks down in eleven easy […]

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    Q+A with Bonnie Stewart: “We are part of a society and an academy where the personal/professional divide is blurring”

Q+A with Bonnie Stewart: “We are part of a society and an academy where the personal/professional divide is blurring”

LSE’s NetworkED seminar series for 2016 kick starts this Wednesday (20 January) with Bonnie Stewart. Here she provides a brief look into her research on scholarly identities and how relatively open social spaces like Twitter can be used by scholars for immersive professional development. But, she notes, this space is not without risks. The session will be streamed live and can […]

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    An election propelled by academia? Blurring the lines between political science and politics in Spain

An election propelled by academia? Blurring the lines between political science and politics in Spain

The recent Spanish general election has proven to be fertile ground for interactions between politics and academia. Tena Prelec and Stuart Brown single out two phenomena that have developed in Spain: the progressive engagement of precariously-paid junior scholars in politics, and a thriving community of young academic commentators which supplements, and in some cases supplants, the work of the mainstream media.

The results of the Spanish elections on […]

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2015 Year-In-Review: LSE Impact Blog’s Most Popular Posts

It has become a tradition on the Impact Blog to look back at the end of the year and share a round-up of our top posts. Managing Editor Sierra Williams delves into the Google Analytics and provides a list of the most viewed pieces along with a wider look at our top tweets and our most captivating posts (minutes per page) on the […]

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December 22nd, 2015|LSE Comment, Top 5|3 Comments|
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    6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

The digital environment offers many opportunities, but also opens up certain risks, particularly for children. How can government action look to maximise children’s online opportunities – thereby boosting digital skills and literacies – without substantially adding to their risks? Sonia Livingstone presents six points that policymakers should consider to encourage wider support of children’s digital opportunities.

I’ve been researching children’s internet use […]

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    Research in the age of mass surveillance: Finding an ethical consensus over new digital visual research methods.

Research in the age of mass surveillance: Finding an ethical consensus over new digital visual research methods.

With digital recording devices now widely available, the power and functionality of these tools may far outstrip what is strictly required for research purposes. Tze Ming Mok looks at some of the specific ethical research conundrums emerging with the use of first-person visual recording devices. Researchers cannot afford to ignore these ethical challenges. The fundamental principles of research ethics frameworks still stand, and are becoming ever […]

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    Meetings can be a waste of time: Seven strategies to get the most out of your meetings and discussions.

Meetings can be a waste of time: Seven strategies to get the most out of your meetings and discussions.

One of the main sources of frustration and boredom in the workplace is unnecessary meetings. And yet meetings remain a central component of intellectual communication, departmental strategy and academic committee structures. Geoff Mulgan suggests seven ways to improve meetings, based on systematic research and experience.

Many of us spend much of our time in meetings and at conferences. But too often […]

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    The effect of NSS scores and league tables on student demand and university application rates is relatively small.

The effect of NSS scores and league tables on student demand and university application rates is relatively small.

As competition for student recruitment continues to intensify, policymakers and administrators are encouraging an emphasis on ‘student experience’. The National Student Survey (NSS) scores are one indicator that attempts to measure this. But do students really take any notice of NSS scores in making their university choices? Stephen Gibbons shares findings which suggest the effect of changes in NSS scores on […]

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    Addressing anxiety in the teaching room: Innovative techniques to enhance mathematics and statistics education.

Addressing anxiety in the teaching room: Innovative techniques to enhance mathematics and statistics education.

Mathematics and statistics anxiety is one of the major challenges involved in communicating complex mathematical concepts to non-specialists. Meena Kotecha reports back from a recent conference where educators and researchers presented on how they have addressed the issue of anxiety in the classroom. Individual learning requirements need to be carefully considered in order to promote a climate that is […]

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    An antidote to futility: Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously

An antidote to futility: Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously

Blogs are now an established part of the chattersphere/public conversation, especially in international development circles, but Duncan Green finds academic take-up lacking. Here he outlines the major arguments for taking blogging and social media seriously. It doesn’t need to become another onerous time-commitment. Reading a blog should be like listening to the person talk, but with links.

Before I started […]

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    The arXiv cannot replace traditional publishing without addressing the standards of research assessment.

The arXiv cannot replace traditional publishing without addressing the standards of research assessment.

Jan van den Heuvel considers the vital role of discipline-specific repositories in the research process. The arXiv came into existence because it provided a solution to a very practical problem, namely publication time-lags. Recent developments like overlay journals suggest these platforms could play a bigger role in the publishing process, but as long as recruitment and promotion panels attach value to […]

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    What does Academia_edu’s success mean for Open Access? The data-driven world of search engines and social networking

What does Academia_edu’s success mean for Open Access? The data-driven world of search engines and social networking

With over 36 million visitors each month, the massive popularity of Academia.edu is uncontested. But posting on Academia.edu is far from being ethically and politically equivalent to using an institutional open access repository, argues Gary Hall. Academia.edu’s financial rationale rests on exploiting the data flows generated by the academics who use the platform. The open access movement is in danger of being […]

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    Five Minutes with Professor Sonia Livingstone on the benefits of open access and institutional repositories.

Five Minutes with Professor Sonia Livingstone on the benefits of open access and institutional repositories.

Professor Sonia Livingstone shares her thoughts on the LSE’s institutional repository, LSE Research Online (LSERO). Since 2010, content in LSERO has received over six million downloads. For 2015, it has already received over one million downloads. LSERO is a rich resource containing a variety of LSE research, including journal articles, reports, book chapters, working papers, conference papers, datasets and video.

Do you […]

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    A European Twitter sphere? What tweets on the Greek bailout say about how Europeans interact online.

A European Twitter sphere? What tweets on the Greek bailout say about how Europeans interact online.

To what extent does twitter provide a platform for the emergence of a European public sphere? Max Hänska and Stefan Bauchowitz outline preliminary results from a study on the use of twitter by Europeans during the negotiations that produced the provisional agreement on a third bailout programme for Greece in July. They write that there is some clear evidence […]

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    Rather than a restrictive ‘social media policy’, create a ‘social media playbook’ – Lessons from Social Media Week.

Rather than a restrictive ‘social media policy’, create a ‘social media playbook’ – Lessons from Social Media Week.

The social web is now fully embedded into our lives. It’s the new normal in audience behaviour and university and employer brands ignore it at their peril. But how are organisations tackling the challenge? Amy Mollett, LSE Social Media Manager, and Sarah Guthrie, LSE Head of Internal Communications, share six things they learned at the Social Media Week […]

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    Introducing…LSE Business Review: The top ten ways in which business firms and universities interact.

Introducing…LSE Business Review: The top ten ways in which business firms and universities interact.

The LSE Business Review blog launches today, Monday 7 September 2015. It is an LSE-wide initiative to improve knowledge-exchange activities connecting academics with the business community — corporations, firms, business executives and managers. The cross-disciplinary blog is funded by the ESRC Impact Acceleration Accounts and will draw on business-facing and business-relevant contributions from across all LSE departments, alums, business leaders, think […]

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    Actions speak louder than words: Adaptive non-verbal communication is a key leadership skill for collaborative teams.

Actions speak louder than words: Adaptive non-verbal communication is a key leadership skill for collaborative teams.

Non-verbal communication is extremely influential in interpersonal encounters, and knowing how to leverage non-verbal signals effectively can be a key leadership skill. Connson Locke shares her research findings that suggest displaying an overly-confident and authoritative non-verbal communication can have a damaging effect on a team’s sharing of information and collaboration.

This piece originally appeared on British Politics and Policy.

It is widely accepted that […]

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Vacancy: Managing Editor, LSE Review of Books

Our sister blog, LSE Review of Books is currently recruiting for the position of Managing Editor. This is a great opportunity to join our team! The Communications Division at LSE is seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic individual with experience working with academic writing and a keen interest in the social sciences to work as the Managing Editor of […]

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    Hacking the system of social influence: How can we use the mechanics of influence to drive behaviour for public good?

Hacking the system of social influence: How can we use the mechanics of influence to drive behaviour for public good?

Social influence is one of the most cited and yet least understood concepts in strategy and public policy today. While many people understand its critical importance in viral marketing campaigns, technology adoption, protest movements and other collective behaviours, there is little agreement on how it can be measured and harnessed for the greater good. In this post Vyacheslav Polonski explores how […]

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    Rather than narrow our definition of impact, we should use metrics to explore richness and diversity of outcomes.

Rather than narrow our definition of impact, we should use metrics to explore richness and diversity of outcomes.

Impact is multi-dimensional, the routes by which impact occur are different across disciplines and sectors, and impact changes over time. Jane Tinkler argues that if institutions like HEFCE specify a narrow set of impact metrics, more harm than good would come to universities forced to limit their understanding of how research is making a difference. But qualitative and quantitative indicators continue […]

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This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.