• CERN workshop innovation in scholarly communication
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    Author survey data reveals changing perceptions of scholarly communication and wider participation in open access.

Author survey data reveals changing perceptions of scholarly communication and wider participation in open access.

Dan Penny, Head of Insights at Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan, shares findings from the recent Author Insights Survey. The survey data is openly available and offers an extensive look into researcher perceptions and understandings of academic publishing. Few researchers are now unaware of open access. But perceptions of quality still remain a significant barrier to further OA involvement.

From Chinese […]

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    Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

The competitive nature of scholarship and the precariousness of academic employment is what currently hinders early-career researchers, not open access publishing. Rather than warning researchers of the dangers of confronting outdated and proprietary forms of scholarship, all should be engaged in questioning the practices that perpetuate the broken system, argues Samuel Moore.

One of the frequently voiced criticisms of open-access […]

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    Permission to tweet? The underlying principles of good science communication are all about sharing.

Permission to tweet? The underlying principles of good science communication are all about sharing.

Terry Wheeler was at the 100th annual conference of the Ecological Society of America last week. Alongside community shifts towards openness, the rise of Twitter has led to a huge shift in the way science is shared. But with little explanation from the organisers, a confusing opt-in policy for live-tweeting was implemented. Social media is one of the most powerful tools scientists […]

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  • scholarlyidentity table featured
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    What will the scholarly profile page of the future look like? Provision of metadata is enabling experimentation.

What will the scholarly profile page of the future look like? Provision of metadata is enabling experimentation.

From multi-stakeholder platforms like ORCID, to commercial services like Google Scholar, academic profiles exist in a complex landscape of information flows. Lambert Heller provides an overview of the available scholarly profile pages and offers insight into their future development, which is set to be shaped by business models, technology, and available data streams. 

We’re used to easily finding researchers’ profile pages on the […]

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    The case against the journal article: The age of publisher authority is going, going, gone — and we’ll be just fine.

The case against the journal article: The age of publisher authority is going, going, gone — and we’ll be just fine.

Heidi Laine evaluates the often unsubstantiated claim that the journal article is central to the research communication process. Is a formal article really such a law of nature? She argues that the journal article (at least as we know it) will become a thing of the past. It will soon be replaced by article-style narrative reports, blogs, wikis, video and audio […]

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    Dutch universities plan Elsevier boycott — will this be a game changer or will publisher profits remain unaffected?

Dutch universities plan Elsevier boycott — will this be a game changer or will publisher profits remain unaffected?

Led by vice chancellors, Dutch universities have recently announced plans for a country-wide boycott of the academic publisher Elsevier. Such a boycott has the potential to be a significant game changer in the relationship between the research community and the world’s largest academic publisher. But how will it affect open access momentum in the UK and around the world? Here […]

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    Positioning educational technology around the three Rs universities care about: Recruitment, Retention and Reputation

Positioning educational technology around the three Rs universities care about: Recruitment, Retention and Reputation

Technological development in higher education has been a slow-moving process. Martin Weller makes the case for a more pragmatic approach that looks to align current innovations with the areas vice chancellors, provosts and presidents are already concerned about: recruitment, retention and reputation. It may be less exciting, but ultimately a more useful approach to embedding valuable, learning-centred technologies across universities.

Whenever a new […]

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    How can universities increase Green Open Access? Article deposit rates soar after direct solicitation from library.

How can universities increase Green Open Access? Article deposit rates soar after direct solicitation from library.

Universities have struggled to increase article deposit rates for their institutional repositories. Regardless of citation benefits and top-down mandates, getting faculty to adjust publishing workflows does not happen overnight. At their institution, Michael Boock and Hui Zhang found that direct solicitation of author manuscripts has been the most effective method of reaching a higher deposit rate.

Authors who wish to provide open […]

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    Subscriptions no longer needed: flipping journals to Open Access while supporting existing OA publications

Subscriptions no longer needed: flipping journals to Open Access while supporting existing OA publications

The Open Library of Humanities is an open access publishing platform for the humanities and social sciences. Key to its growth will be to convince current journals to join the platform. Co-founder Martin Eve reflects on how this might work and the range of benefits for subscription and other high cost open-access journals in making the switch. Finding ways to move […]

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    Elsevier’s new sharing policy is really a reversal of the rights of authors.

Elsevier’s new sharing policy is really a reversal of the rights of authors.

Virgina Barbour takes to task publishing giant Elsevier for their latest round of introduced restrictions on the sharing of academic research. Their new policy states that, if no article processing charge is paid, an author’s accepted version of the article cannot be made publicly available via their institution’s repository until after the embargo period, which can ranges from six months to […]

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    Incentives for open science: New prizes to encourage research integrity and transparency in social science.

Incentives for open science: New prizes to encourage research integrity and transparency in social science.

The high-profile political science study on same-sex marriage views in the U.S., now determined to be fraudulent, is the latest case exposing the need for incentive structures that make academic research open, transparent, and replicable. The U.S. study has been retracted, largely thanks to the discovery of inconsistencies in the data by an outside group. The academic community must […]

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    Why perpetuate a 300-year-old anachronism? Reincarnating the research article into a ‘living document’.

Why perpetuate a 300-year-old anachronism? Reincarnating the research article into a ‘living document’.

Online publication provides us with new freedom to update, amend and extend the research article as we know it. Daniel Shanahan presents a vision of the evolution of the article beyond the limits of the printed page. Creating a living document for a single research project, updated in real time, would lead to it being evaluated based on the […]

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    Fast and made to last: Academic blogs look to ensure long-term accessibility and stability of content.

Fast and made to last: Academic blogs look to ensure long-term accessibility and stability of content.

Academic blogging has distinct advantages over traditional forms of scholarly communication but questions on their lasting preservation still remain to be seen. Who makes sure academic blog content stays online in the long term? Who guarantees that links to the post remains the same? Who ensures that the text will not be modified later on? Christof Schöch argues these are issues that […]

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    Self-host a scientific journal with eLife Lens: open source software to power open publishing systems.

Self-host a scientific journal with eLife Lens: open source software to power open publishing systems.

The open access journal eLife has an ongoing commitment to not only making their research articles free to read, reuse and remix, but also their publishing software. By making these underlying resources available, academic communities can explore and embrace their own open digital platforms. Michael Aufreiter introduces the key features of the eLife Lens software. With this simple setup publishers can self-host […]

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    What’s the matter with ebooks? In our praise for print, we forget the great virtues of digital formats.

What’s the matter with ebooks? In our praise for print, we forget the great virtues of digital formats.

Do print versions still have an advantage over electronic formats? Ebook sales may be reaching a plateau but Dan Cohen argues there may be much more dark reading going on than the stats are showing. A huge and growing percentage of ebooks are being sold by indie publishers or authors themselves, and a third of them don’t even have ISBNs, the universal ID used to track […]

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    Gold open access in practice: How will universities respond to the rising total cost of publication?

Gold open access in practice: How will universities respond to the rising total cost of publication?

Are universities able to shoulder the costs of the open access transition? Stephen Pinfield presents findings on the current state of institutional costs. The total cost of publication is defined as existing subscription costs, article processing charges (APCs) and the costs of administering them. So is the total cost of publication rising for universities overall? In the short term at […]

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