• Ocean_City_Ferris_Wheel
    Permalink Gallery

    Will David Willetts be remembered for progressive push for Open Access or pernicious effects of neoliberal academy?

Will David Willetts be remembered for progressive push for Open Access or pernicious effects of neoliberal academy?

Now that the cabinet reshuffle news has settled and Greg Clark MP, the new Minister for Universities, Science, and Cities has begun his tenure, we asked for further reflections on the positions taken by previous minister David Willetts. David Prosser covers the dramatic influence Willetts had on open access legislation and momentum in the UK. Lee Jones instead emphasises the escalation […]

Print Friendly
  • moocs
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

Book Review: The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

In The War on Learning, Elizabeth Losh analyses recent trends in post-secondary education and the rhetoric around them. In an effort to identify educational technologies that might actually work, she looks at strategies including MOOCs, the gamification of subject matter, remix pedagogy, video lectures, and educational virtual worlds. Losh’s work is valuable reading for students and parents trying to make sense of when current […]

Print Friendly
  • innovation
    Permalink Gallery

    Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

‘Disruptive Innovation’ has become a more practical than theoretical debate in higher education all while criticism mounts over the theory’s scholarly merits. In the midst of high-profile interrogation by academics, Eric Van de Velde reflects on his experience of the value of Christensen’s concept of disruption for information sharing and technological advancement in the scholarly community. The episode also poses […]

Print Friendly
  • gift economy
    Permalink Gallery

    Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Alongside research papers and data, software is a vital research object. As more become confronted with its significance in the future of scientific discovery, a variety of opinions and philosophies are emerging over how to approach sustainable scientific software development. Matthew Turk provides background on his involvement in the Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE) […]

Print Friendly
  • featured micah
    Permalink Gallery

    Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

The Society for Scholarly Publishing recently hosted a session on open access publishing and authors’ rights titled “Open Access Mandates and Open Access ‘Mandates’: How Much Control Should Authors Have over Their Work?” This post is the edited text from Micah Vandegrift’s talk along with his accompanying slides. Scholarly communication is mired in a binary, black and white system that […]

Print Friendly
  • chalmers_featured
    Permalink Gallery

    Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Due to differences in citation practices amongst scientific disciplines, existing research on a possible open access citation advantage remains limited. A new study seeks to overcome these limitations by investigating whether there is a possible OA citation advantage across all fields. Lars Kullman  presents his findings on cross-field citation comparisons between OA and non-OA articles from the Chalmers University of Technology self-archive repository. […]

Print Friendly
  • 1280px-ADWhiteReadingRoom,_CornellUniversity
    Permalink Gallery

    A note to administrators and librarians: Those that fund research are responsible for funding its dissemination.

A note to administrators and librarians: Those that fund research are responsible for funding its dissemination.

Only when the bulk of research comes with funds to pay author-side fees will publishers feel comfortable moving to new open business models. But who should be responsible for paying these new author-side fees? Stuart Shieber argues that those that fund research should be held responsible for funding its dissemination. As funders of research, universities themselves should be looking to […]

Print Friendly
  • text data
    Permalink Gallery

    The right to read is the right to mine: Text and data mining copyright exceptions introduced in the UK.

The right to read is the right to mine: Text and data mining copyright exceptions introduced in the UK.

New copyright exceptions to text and data mining for non-commercial research have recently come into effect and this is welcome news for UK researchers and research, argues Ross Mounce. Here he provides a brief overview of the past issues discouraging text and data mining and the what the future holds now that these exceptions have been introduced. But despite […]

Print Friendly
  • joinordiefinal
    Permalink Gallery

    Impact Round-Up 24th May: GitHub for science, research in the national interest, and myths of ‘big data’

Impact Round-Up 24th May: GitHub for science, research in the national interest, and myths of ‘big data’

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

This week Science have launched a special section, The science of inequality, which brings together a range of social science perspectives and short videos on “the origins, impact, and future of inequality around the world”. All features are currently not paywalled […]

Print Friendly
  • 1percentpiketty
    Permalink Gallery

    Thomas Piketty’s Capital changed the global discussion about inequality because of its great data – now make it open.

Thomas Piketty’s Capital changed the global discussion about inequality because of its great data – now make it open.

The rich data informing Thomas Piketty’s landmark research in Capital in the Twenty-First Century has been instrumental to its success. Ulrich Atz argues it is highly commendable that Piketty has made attempts to share the data files. But none of this data is explicitly open for reuse and fails to be available in machine-readable formats. Without an open licence it is not clear […]

Print Friendly
  • paperdigital
    Permalink Gallery

    Academic citation practices need to be modernized so that all references are digital and lead to full texts.

Academic citation practices need to be modernized so that all references are digital and lead to full texts.

Researchers and academics spend a lot of time documenting the sources of the ideas, methods and evidence they have drawn on in their own writings. But Patrick Dunleavy writes that our existing citation and referencing practices are now woefully out of date and no longer fit for purpose. The whole scholarly purpose of citing sources has changed around us, […]

Print Friendly
  • collaborate
    Permalink Gallery

    Publishers respond to growing need for collaboration by offering an open access home for interdisciplinary research.

Publishers respond to growing need for collaboration by offering an open access home for interdisciplinary research.

The new journal Palgrave Communications aims to support interdisciplinary development by offering a high-quality outlet for research in the humanities, the social sciences and business, hoping to foster interaction, creativity and reflection within and between disciplines. Sam Burridge provides an initial overview of the new outlet. But developing truly collaborative research takes time, a feature with little appreciation in funding and policy […]

Print Friendly
  • ocean mapping
    Permalink Gallery

    Global-level data sets may be more highly cited than most journal articles.

Global-level data sets may be more highly cited than most journal articles.

Scientists can be reluctant to share data because of the need to publish journal articles and receive recognition. But what if the data sets were actually a better way of getting credit for your work? Chris Belter measured the impact of a few openly accessible data sets and compared to journal articles in his field. His results provide hard evidence that […]

Print Friendly
  • creativity
    Permalink Gallery

    Impact Round Up 10th May: Reputational gaps, registered reports, and serendipity in research.

Impact Round Up 10th May: Reputational gaps, registered reports, and serendipity in research.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

Give the pioneers a chance – OA and closing the reputational gap for young scientists by Alexander Grossman:
Substitute pay-walled journals with new open science technologies to publicly publish your scientific results; continue to use social network tools to […]

Print Friendly
  • fork
    Permalink Gallery

    Fork, merge and crowd-sourcing data curation: tools for collective data processing and analysis.

Fork, merge and crowd-sourcing data curation: tools for collective data processing and analysis.

With the right formats, licensing and distribution mechanisms, people can easily collaborate over data, enhance the analysis and re-purpose for their own needs. Cameron Neylon reflects on the tools available for these aims. The interfaces that make working with the data easy may create barriers to automation and computational processing down the line. Further mechanisms are needed, both social […]

Print Friendly
  • green light madrid
    Permalink Gallery

    The only way to make inflated journal subscriptions unsustainable: Mandate Green Open Access.

The only way to make inflated journal subscriptions unsustainable: Mandate Green Open Access.

In light of further data provided by Tim Gowers on unsustainable costs of journal subscriptions for academic libraries and stretched university budgets, Stevan Harnad finds that plans for universities to fund open access alternatives will also be a burden as 80% of journals are still subscription-based. What is needed now is for universities and funders to develop mutually reinforcing self-archiving policies, […]

Print Friendly
  • treeknowledge.jpg
    Permalink Gallery

    Impact Round-Up 26th April: The cost of journal subscriptions, writing for impact, and the Journal Openness Index.

Impact Round-Up 26th April: The cost of journal subscriptions, writing for impact, and the Journal Openness Index.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

Open access advocate and Cambridge mathematician Tim Gowers has been pulling together information on Elsevier journal subscription costs in an effort to provide a bigger picture of what the current scholarly communication system is costing university libraries (previously […]

Print Friendly
  • openness
    Permalink Gallery

    To argue against open access on the grounds that it damages the reach of research is to undersell research.

To argue against open access on the grounds that it damages the reach of research is to undersell research.

In this article, Ben Johnson posits that the frequently asked questions concerning open access implementation for particular disciplines arise from an incomplete conception of the nature of openness more generally. This conception neglects one vital component of openness: connection. Connection requires moving beyond a view of open access as a disruptive process towards a more nuanced picture of the interrelationship between openness, […]

Print Friendly
  • wikipedia poster
    Permalink Gallery

    Creating an efficient workflow for publishing scholarly papers on Wikipedia.

Creating an efficient workflow for publishing scholarly papers on Wikipedia.

The global scope and popularity of Wikipedia make it an ideal medium for researchers to share expertise. But it has been difficult to find an efficient way to link accessible scholarly work into the edits. Martin Poulter describes how the journal PLOS Computational Biology has tackled this issue by inviting submissions of review papers on a specific topic or research technique that has no […]

Print Friendly
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.