• moocs
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

Book Review: The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

In The War on Learning, Elizabeth Losh analyses recent trends in post-secondary education and the rhetoric around them. In an effort to identify educational technologies that might actually work, she looks at strategies including MOOCs, the gamification of subject matter, remix pedagogy, video lectures, and educational virtual worlds. Losh’s work is valuable reading for students and parents trying to make sense of when current […]

Print Friendly
  • david willetts
    Permalink Gallery

    Higher Education community responds to cabinet reshuffle, but it is too soon to foretell David Willetts’ legacy.

Higher Education community responds to cabinet reshuffle, but it is too soon to foretell David Willetts’ legacy.

Following David Willetts’ resignation as part of the UK government’s cabinet reshuffle, Greg Clark MP has today been announced as the new Minister for Universities and Science. Steven Jones looks at the flurry of comment taking place on Twitter about the reshuffle, the government’s higher education initiatives over the past four years, and what might prove to be the lasting legacy of […]

Print Friendly
  • Earthlights_dmsp
    Permalink Gallery

    Altmetrics may be able to help in evaluating societal reach, but research significance must be peer reviewed.

Altmetrics may be able to help in evaluating societal reach, but research significance must be peer reviewed.

Social media indicators of scholarly communication, or commonly referenced as altmetrics, are still far from being adopted as part of everyday research evaluation, but they already have stated value in indicating what is interesting and popular. Kim Holmberg argues these indicators have exciting potential for measuring the impact of public outreach. But further research is necessary to fully understand their value and possible […]

Print Friendly
  • big data
    Permalink Gallery

    The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Rob Kitchin: “Big data should complement small data, not replace them.”

The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Rob Kitchin: “Big data should complement small data, not replace them.”

Over the coming weeks we will be featuring a series of interviews conducted by Mark Carrigan on the nature of ‘big data’ and the opportunities and challenges presented for scholarship with its growing influence. In this first interview, Rob Kitchin elaborates on the specific characteristics of big data, the hype and hubris surrounding its advent, and the distinction between data-driven science and empiricism.

What […]

Print Friendly
  • iphone-324781_1920
    Permalink Gallery

    Survey findings point to the benefits and risks associated with academics using social media.

Survey findings point to the benefits and risks associated with academics using social media.

While the advantages of social media are increasingly recognised by academics and universities, potential negative aspects need to be identified and managed by individuals and their institutions. Deborah Lupton presents the findings from her survey which underscore how social media can facilitate connection and sharing of material, however the speed and rapid churn of ideas, as well as the use of social media for […]

Print Friendly

Book Review: Going Viral by Karine Nahon and Jeff Hemsley

In Going, Viral Karine Nahon and Jeff Hemsley look to uncover the factors that make tweets, videos, and news stories go viral online. They analyze the characteristics of networks that shape virality, including the crucial role of gatekeepers who control the flow of information and connect networks to one another. This concise and insightful book targets a niche topic in the studies of digital […]

Print Friendly
  • foucault
    Permalink Gallery

    Five Minutes with Anne Barron and Mary Evans: “Academics seldom have the opportunity to discuss issues about their profession”

Five Minutes with Anne Barron and Mary Evans: “Academics seldom have the opportunity to discuss issues about their profession”

To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the death of social theorist Michel Foucault, Anne Barron and Mary Evans have organised a conference in late June for academics to reflect on his legacy in relation to higher education. Governing Academic Life will create an interdisciplinary space to discuss the public university, neoliberalism, academic publishing, and assessment measurement. Managing Editor Sierra Williams […]

Print Friendly
  • dataviztwittter
    Permalink Gallery

    Publicly available data from Twitter is public evidence and does not necessarily constitute an “ethical dilemma”.

Publicly available data from Twitter is public evidence and does not necessarily constitute an “ethical dilemma”.

An article in Scientific American suggests further ethical considerations should be made for research derived from Twitter data. Ernesto Priego questions first the extent to which Twitter will actually release all of its valuable data and also argues archiving and disseminating information from Twitter and other public archives does not have to be cause for an “ethical dilemma” so long […]

Print Friendly

Big data brings new power to open-source intelligence

The story of Eliot Higgins, a blogger who exploits publicly accessible material to piece together important facts about the Syrian conflict, offers a unique insight into the enormous potential of open-source intelligence. Matthew Moran describes how the networked society has spawned new analytical approaches and opportunities. 

In November 2013, the New Yorker published a profile of Eliot Higgins – or Brown Moses as he is known to almost 17,000 Twitter followers. […]

Print Friendly
  • ipad video.jpg
    Permalink Gallery

    Video abstracts are a low-barrier means for publishers to extend the shelf life of research.

Video abstracts are a low-barrier means for publishers to extend the shelf life of research.

Similar to a standard article abstract, video abstracts typically cover key information on the background of the article’s study, methods used, results and discussion of impact.  However, Scott Spicer finds video abstracts extend the possible reach of research by providing the author a platform to communicate their research through a low-barrier, personalized, media-rich medium, in ways that would have been […]

Print Friendly
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
    Permalink Gallery

    ‘Big data’ from online market interactions offer a rich opportunity to study human nature and economic behaviour.

‘Big data’ from online market interactions offer a rich opportunity to study human nature and economic behaviour.

Data on the interactions between individuals on the Internet are often viewed as a potential threat to privacy or freedom of expression. As Wojtek Przepiorka writes, however, the ‘big data’ produced by online transactions and feedback processes on websites such as eBay can also be an invaluable resource for academics and policy-makers. He argues that subjecting this data to formal study […]

Print Friendly
  • HDT slider
    Permalink Gallery

    Impact Round-Up 29th March: Citation types, commercialised knowledge, and boundary workers.

Impact Round-Up 29th March: Citation types, commercialised knowledge, and boundary workers.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

We need different types of citation: Replicates, Falsifies, DependsOn, Acknowledges … by Mike Taylor at SV-POW argues for further metadata on citation type to be pulled in, which would add a richer and more useful layer to citation metrics.

Over at Patter, Pat […]

Print Friendly
  • facebook slider
    Permalink Gallery

    Social media is a ticking time bomb for universities with an outdated web presence.

Social media is a ticking time bomb for universities with an outdated web presence.

There are pressing questions academic institutions will need to address over the next couple of years regarding their expanding participation in social media streams. Andy Tattersall argues that with such blurred boundaries of ownership, access and support, what is needed is wide-scale demystification to help academics dovetail a few choice tools to bring how they work into a modern setting. Social […]

Print Friendly

The death of the theorist and the emergence of data and algorithms in digital social research.

Computer software and data-processing algorithms are becoming an everyday part of Higher Education. How might this be affecting research in the social sciences and the formation of the professional identities of academics? Ben Williamson argues that these are important challenges for social science researchers in HE, asking us to consider how digital devices and infrastructures might be shaping our professional […]

Print Friendly
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.