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    ‘Big data’ from online market interactions offer a rich opportunity to study human nature and economic behaviour.

‘Big data’ from online market interactions offer a rich opportunity to study human nature and economic behaviour.

Data on the interactions between individuals on the Internet are often viewed as a potential threat to privacy or freedom of expression. As Wojtek Przepiorka writes, however, the ‘big data’ produced by online transactions and feedback processes on websites such as eBay can also be an invaluable resource for academics and policy-makers. He argues that subjecting this data to formal study […]

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    Impact Round-Up 29th March: Citation types, commercialised knowledge, and boundary workers.

Impact Round-Up 29th March: Citation types, commercialised knowledge, and boundary workers.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

We need different types of citation: Replicates, Falsifies, DependsOn, Acknowledges … by Mike Taylor at SV-POW argues for further metadata on citation type to be pulled in, which would add a richer and more useful layer to citation metrics.

Over at Patter, Pat […]

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    Social media is a ticking time bomb for universities with an outdated web presence.

Social media is a ticking time bomb for universities with an outdated web presence.

There are pressing questions academic institutions will need to address over the next couple of years regarding their expanding participation in social media streams. Andy Tattersall argues that with such blurred boundaries of ownership, access and support, what is needed is wide-scale demystification to help academics dovetail a few choice tools to bring how they work into a modern setting. Social […]

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The death of the theorist and the emergence of data and algorithms in digital social research.

Computer software and data-processing algorithms are becoming an everyday part of Higher Education. How might this be affecting research in the social sciences and the formation of the professional identities of academics? Ben Williamson argues that these are important challenges for social science researchers in HE, asking us to consider how digital devices and infrastructures might be shaping our professional […]

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Impact Round-Up 18th January: #altmetrics mania, adjunct invisibility, and quantitative sociology at Facebook.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication. A sociologist working at facebook by Michael Corey at OrgTheory. Facebookers are heavily involved with academic pursuits…My own team (Growth Research) is made up of two sociologists and a manager trained in communications with a sociologist as an advisor. Many […]

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The evolution of social networking sites: the rise of content-centric platforms which favour the perpetual present.

Socio-technical trends and their underlying theoretical perspectives shed light on likely developments in store for mediated communication. Vyacheslav Polonski finds that in the coming years, new design norms will overhaul current metaphors, marking a shift from profile-centric to content-centric interactions. In the increasingly ephemeral live-streams of receiving and broadcasting information, Polonski predicts we will be able to transcend the stale antinomy of […]

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Creating, curating and circulating research: our top five posts on Social Media

Social media has proven itself to be a useful tool for the wider dissemination of research. Our list of the top five posts from the past year includes an A-Z guide of using social media in academia and also critically explores the politics around what gets shared and by whom.

From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be […]

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January 4th, 2014|Social Media, Top 5|1 Comment|

Twitter and traditional bibliometrics are separate but complementary aspects of research impact.

In a recent study, Haustein and colleagues found a weak correlation between the number of times a paper is tweeted about and subsequent citations. But the study also found papers from 2012 were tweeted about ten times more than papers from 2010. Emily Darling discusses the results and finds that while altmetrics may do a poor job at predicting the traditional […]

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Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: The Battle for “Open”.

There are no simple answers to the growing demand for openness in relation to education technology and scholarly communication. Audrey Watters takes a look back at how the term ‘open’ has been discussed in the last year. As open continues to triumph in many ways, its appeal has also led to an expansion of ‘openwashing’ activities. The education community is […]

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From the precarious university to the rise and rise of social media: our most popular posts of 2013.

It has been a great year for the Impact of Social Sciences blog and we look forward to the exciting times ahead – particularly with the launch of our Research Book next month! But it wouldn’t be the new year without a look back in list-form. We will be featuring a series of posts over the next week highlighting the variety of […]

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As academic blogging becomes mainstream, science communication must facilitate depth and breadth in online discourse.

Having recently attended a conference session on the role of online forums for science communication, Alan Cann reflects on the extent to which academic blogging is currently embedded in academic practice. Blogs are still the centre of serious online academic communication but there is still a long way to go until the Republic of Blogs is established and academic blogging moves […]

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Findings must be differentiated from speculation to ensure the responsible reporting of research to the media.

It can be hard to excite the general public about scientific results unless you talk about potential implications. But it is the duty of researchers and press officers to be crystal clear to avoid causing confusion and distress. Dorothy Bishop compares the actual findings of a recent neuroscience study to its corresponding press release. Science communication has failed if the press […]

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Fast scholarship is not always good scholarship: relevant research requires more than an online presence.

Blogging and social media are tools to facilitate engagement, but are they in danger of being treated as ends in themselves? Catherine Durose and Katherine Tonkiss argue for more awareness on how the research process can democratise knowledge. Rather than quickly responding to recent events, scholars should look towards sustained engagement with the participants of research and those affected by it.  The feminist […]

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Social media presents a growing body of evidence that can inform social and economic policy.

Social media offers exciting data resources for researchers. But if this body of complex data and its subsequent analysis are going to positively impact public policy and services, governments may have to take a leading role in managing access and determining boundaries. Jason Leavey presents the findings of a new report investigating how feasible and useful evidence from social media […]

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Using Pinterest to create reading lists: a step by step guide

With Autumn well on the way, students and academics are preparing for the excitement of the new term and publishers everywhere are looking to attract our attention with a bountiful selection of new academic and fiction releases. Bringing these together, LSE Review of Books Managing Editor Amy Mollett talks readers through making beautiful reading lists using social bookmarking tool Pinterest. Every […]

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From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now

Digital media is changing how scholars interact, collaborate, write and publish. Here, Jessie Daniels describes how to be a scholar now, when peer-reviewed articles can begin as Tweets and blog posts. In this new environment, scholars are able to create knowledge in ways that are more open, more fluid, and more easily read by wider audiences. Digital media is changing […]

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Book Review: Ethics of Media

Do digital media create new ethical dilemmas? What is our responsibility as spectators and witnesses? Bringing together philosophers and media scholars and drawing on a range of contemporary case studies, Ethics of Media aims to highlight the diversity of competing answers to the question, ‘is there an ethics of media?’ Patrick Weir finds that this is thought provoking first step in discussing the […]

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September 15th, 2013|Book Reviews, Social Media|1 Comment|
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.