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    Newly updated for International Women’s Day – Gender Bias in Academe bibliography

Newly updated for International Women’s Day – Gender Bias in Academe bibliography

On this International Women’s Day, and the first anniversary of the post originally appearing on the Impact Blog, Danica Savonick and Cathy N. Davidson have updated the Gender Bias in Academe bibliography with 17 new studies. Here, they offer a brief insight into some of these additions and also appeal to readers and collaborators to continue to share details of new studies so […]

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    Coeducation at university was – and is – no triumph of feminism

Coeducation at university was – and is – no triumph of feminism

In the late 1960s, many elite universities suddenly welcomed women to their undergraduate student bodies. However, as Nancy Weiss Malkiel explains, this was not the consequence of a high-minded commitment to opening opportunities to women but rather one of institutional self-interest. Little wonder, then, that coeducation has failed to lead to a levelling of the playing field for men […]

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    Book Review: Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family by Anne-Marie Slaughter

Book Review: Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family by Anne-Marie Slaughter

Is it really possible to ‘have it all’? In Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family,Anne-Marie Slaughter unravels the ‘half truths’ that lie behind this claim, examining how the struggle to manage increasingly incompatible life and work pressures remains particularly potent for women due to the continued gendering of caregiving. Drawing upon her own experiences, Slaughter calls for us to forge a […]

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    In a world in which ‘everyday sexism’ remains rife, progress on gender discrimination will require quotas

In a world in which ‘everyday sexism’ remains rife, progress on gender discrimination will require quotas

The UK continues to exhibit large disparities in power and representation between men and women. Gender inequality exists within the context of overlapping areas of social, political, professional and economic life. Only a systemic approach offers any hope of tackling the issue. Nicola Lacey of the LSE’s Commission on Gender, Inequality and Power shares findings from the final report, and recommends […]

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    To fight the slow pace of gender equality in the workplace, attack the root cause: invisible, unconscious bias.

To fight the slow pace of gender equality in the workplace, attack the root cause: invisible, unconscious bias.

Gender diversity is correlated with better business results and enormous economic and business value. But unconscious bias continues to negatively affect women in the workplace in a number of ways, writes Caroline Turner. Those who manage teams must actively reveal and uproot these biases.

This piece is part of a wider series on Women in Academia and coincides with LSE Women: making history […]

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    Gender Bias in Academe: An Annotated Bibliography of Important Recent Studies

Gender Bias in Academe: An Annotated Bibliography of Important Recent Studies

Academic research plays an important role in uncovering bias and helping to shape a more equal society. But academia also struggles to adequately confront persistent and entrenched gender bias in its own corridors. Here Danica Savonick and Cathy N. Davidson have aggregated and summarised over twenty research articles on gender bias in academe, a crucial resource for International Women’s Day.

UPDATE: […]

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    Student evaluations of teaching are not only unreliable, they are significantly biased against female instructors.

Student evaluations of teaching are not only unreliable, they are significantly biased against female instructors.

A series of studies across countries and disciplines in higher education confirm that student evaluations of teaching (SET) are significantly correlated with instructor gender, with students regularly rating female instructors lower than male peers. Anne Boring, Kellie Ottoboni and Philip B. Stark argue the findings warrant serious attention in light of increasing pressure on universities to measure teaching effectiveness. Given the unreliability […]

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    Women’s working lives in the managerial university and the pernicious effects of the ‘normal’ academic career.

Women’s working lives in the managerial university and the pernicious effects of the ‘normal’ academic career.

University faculties need to be able to demonstrate to young people, male and female, that women can be just as inspiring teachers and researchers, and be able to live as enjoyable a domestic life as their male counterparts. Angela McRobbie reflects on how the ideal career track in the academy, suffused with constant benchmarking around ‘excellence’ and the REF’s logic […]

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    Falling in love and crying in the academic workplace: “Professionalism”, gender and emotion.

Falling in love and crying in the academic workplace: “Professionalism”, gender and emotion.

Tim Hunt’s remarks on women in science provide a sobering reminder on the everyday reality of systemic bias in the academic workplace. Rachel Moss writes that alongside sexism there is a deeper issue at play, which is about how professionalism itself is socially codified in academia. The “ideal” worker is intellectually engaged and rigorous, but emotionally restrained. But individuals do not necessarily […]

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    What does it take to get to the top? Career progression based on narrow metrics disproportionately holds women back.

What does it take to get to the top? Career progression based on narrow metrics disproportionately holds women back.

Drawing from a set of interviews conducted at Cambridge on career progression, Athene Donald discusses a collective letter calling on the entire higher education sector to reflect on how success is valued and rewarded. Across higher education, we have a process which is likely to disadvantage the typical woman, however smart and valuable she may be. Extrapolating from data accruing on […]

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    Book Review: Presumed Incompetent: the Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

Book Review: Presumed Incompetent: the Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

In Presumed Incompetent, through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, over 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of colour as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. Sin Yee Koh concludes that this is a must-read work, inspiring us to think carefully about the kinds of legacies we leave […]

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