Book Review: Walter Benjamin and the Media by Jaeho Kang

In Walter Benjamin and the Media, Jaeho Kang strikes a near perfect balance between biographical narrative and theoretical analysis. In doing so, Benjamin’s media critique is fully contextualised, removing any notion of obsolescence which may arise from a contemporary reading, writes Andrew Molloy.

Walter Benjamin and the Media. Jaeho Kang. Polity. 2014.

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For the uninitiated, media theory appears to move as fast as […]

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    Book Review: Heidegger and the Media by David Gunkel and Paul A. Taylor

Book Review: Heidegger and the Media by David Gunkel and Paul A. Taylor

Martin Heidegger has been largely ignored within communications studies, but this book aims to show the relevance of his work for the field. David Gunkel and Paul A. Taylor analyse Heidegger’s theory of language and its relevance to communications studies, and assess Heidegger’s legacy for future developments in media theory. Niall Flynn finds this a clear and thought-provoking read, though a touch more […]

How to work with academics for media folks

There is a lot to gain from both sides if media and academia build more bridges, but Tressie McMillan Cottom finds the two working cultures are shaped by very different incentives and priorities which can cause unnecessary friction. Provided here is a helpful primer on the differences between the two, focusing primarily on what media contacts can do to improve and strengthen these […]

Making an impact: communicating your research to a ‘stand up radio’ audience

Steven Fielding finds it bizarre that academics spend so much time producing knowledge, which they then share only with a tiny number of people. Radio documentaries are a great way for academics to break down the ivory tower image. It offers a new environment and the opportunity to work with other disciplines and expertise while reaching a much broader audience. In 2010 […]

Book Review: Working for Policy

Dave O’Brien opens up the black box of policy making in this diverse collection of essays for the academic eye. The essays paint a picture of policy emerging from politicians, bureaucrats, professional experts, advocacy and interest groups, as well as academics, media and citizens, in situations where policy is never a linear process with clear beginnings, middles and ends. Working for […]

December 4th, 2011|Book Reviews|1 Comment|
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