Oct 23 2014

Event: Afghanistan: the transition, LSE Arts and Médecins Sans Frontières public discussion

Leave a comment
Dr Stuart Gordon

Dr Stuart Gordon

Thursday October 30, 6.30-8pm in the New Theatre, East Building

LSE Arts and Médecins Sans Frontières public discussion

“Afghanistan: the transition”

Speakers:
Renzo Frike, Dr Stuart Gordon, Emma Graham-Harrison

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Oct 20 2014

Crowdsourcing corruption – does it work?

Leave a comment

There’s great enthusiasm for a step change in social accountability and lots of high profile initiatives,  yet does it work? And how can research inform future developments in this area?

Dr Dieter Zinnbauer, former PhD student in the Department of International Development and Programme Manager for Transparency International. 

Dieter ZinnbauerIf you are under the age of 40 (and perhaps even if you are like me above it), you are probably familiar with strange fused words such as SeeClickFix or FixMyStreet. These are initiatives that have made the online sourcing of citizen feedback and complaints their main approach for creating more responsive governments. And they have spawned an entire generation of corruption-reporting platforms such as Ipaidabribe or Bribespot. From Armenia to Zimbabwe online corruption reporting has sprung up in many places and related initiatives are heralded as taking social accountability, citizen-action against corruption and the fight against widespread impunity to a new level.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Oct 17 2014

Event: The Social Life of Money

Leave a comment

Professors Nigel Dodd and Keith Hart will be speaking at this event on Thursday 23 October, 2014.

“The Social Life of Money”

Date: Thursday 23 October 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Professor Nigel Dodd
Respondent: Professor Keith Hart
Chair: Professor Stuart Corbridge

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , ,

Oct 16 2014

Jude Howell: Where are all the women in China’s political system?

Leave a comment
Professor Jude Howell

Professor Jude Howell

Professor Jude Howell is a a Professor of International Development at LSE. This article was originally published by the East Asia Forum on 15 October 2014.

In September 2014 the Inter-Parliamentary Union released its latest figures on the number of women in national parliaments. Rwanda topped the league with women accounting for 63.8 per cent of parliamentarians in the lower house (or its equivalent). China, however, ranked 62nd out of 189 countries, with women accounting for 23.4 per cent of representatives to the National People’s Congress (NPC) — China’s nearest equivalent to a parliament. Given that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has long espoused the idea of equality between men and women and has a well-established, dedicated institution for protecting women’s rights and interests — the All-China Women’s Federation (ACWF) — it is curious that the figures are so unimpressive.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , , ,

Oct 14 2014

Robert Wade: The Piketty phenomenon and the future of inequality

Leave a comment

 

Professor Robert Wade

Professor Robert Wade

Professor Robert Wade has contributed the lead article to the latest issue of the Real-World Economics Review, a special issue on Thomas Piketty’s 2014 book Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

Read the full article for free on the Real-World Economics Review website.

 

 

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , , , ,

Oct 10 2014

Improving Basic Services for the Bottom Forty Percent Lessons from Ethiopia

1 Comment

Ethiopia-book

Choice is a luxury for the poor in developing countries and development is about increasing choice and opportunities.  The main asset of the poor being their labor, improving the quality of this labor through better access to basic services is a key to improving opportunities and choice.

On Wednesday 8 October, the International Development department hosted a public lecture to launch a new book investigating the drivers of Ethiopia’s remarkable progress in extending basic education, health and agricultural services throughout the country, and especially to the poorest 40% of the population.  The book is published by the World Bank, and authored by Qaiser Khan, Chris Gaukler and Wendmsyamregne Mekasha of the World Bank, and our own Professor Jean-Paul Faguet.  Dr Khan presented the book’s main findings, and was joined on a panel by Marta Foresti, Director of Politics and Governance at ODI, and Peter Hawkins, Head of Profession for Programme Management at DFID. Professor Faguet chaired the panel.  The event was very well attended, and the Q&A session featured a lively mix of technical questions and opinionated remarks.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Oct 9 2014

Event: ‘Secure the Borders!’ The Cost and Consequences of Europe’s ‘Fight Against Irregular Migration’

Leave a comment

Dr Ruben Andersson , Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of International Development’s Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, will be speaking on ‘Secure the Borders!’ The Cost and Consequences of Europe’s ‘Fight Against Irregular Migration’.

Date: Tuesday 14 October 2014
Time: 5-6.30pm
Venue: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre
Speakers: Dr Ruben Andersson, Dr Nicholas De Genova, Jeremy Harding, Dr Cecilia Malmström

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , ,

Oct 7 2014

Thandika Mkandawire recognized by prestigious Africa-America Institute award

Leave a comment

mkandawire-t-113x148Professor Thandika Mkandawire, Chair of African Development, last week received the 2014 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Africa-America Institute in New York.

On receiving his award, Mkandawire thanked the the AAI for giving him a chance as a young person to come to the United States to study, and also applauded the organization for continuing to support higher education in Africa in recent decades, a time when others were pulling out in favour of primary education. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , ,

Oct 3 2014

Economics, Democracy, and the New World Order

1 Comment
Danny Quah

Professor Danny Quah

Some of us wake up every morning to find ourselves living in a society where economic opportunity is unfairly distributed, where a narrow social elite is given everything while others endure harsh deprivation. If we live in such a society, every morning our soul yearns for a system better than that we’re in.

We might live in a society where discrimination is rife, where government cronies are handed plum benefits, where extractive elites plunder national wealth.

We say we want out of that system. We ask only for a level playing field, for a system that is fair, open, and transparent, a system that practices meritocracy.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Oct 2 2014

Welcome to the LSE. I don’t care what you think.

Leave a comment

jean-paul-faguet-bio-photoProfessor Jean-Paul Faguet

Programme Director MSc Development Management

Dear student,

Welcome to the LSE. I don’t care what you think.

Or maybe, to be a bit more accurate, the fact that you think something is not itself very convincing. I am interested – indeed very interested – in what you think, because in some respect it is bound to be wrong. I’m here to teach and you’re here to learn. Identifying those mistaken assumptions, informational gaps, and incorrect mental models is one of our most pressing priorities. Along the way we will also identify the many correct assumptions, informational assets, and insightful mental models that you also have.

But it is important that we both understand this from the start: your opinions do not have some irreducible merit because they are yours. Nor do mine, nor do any of my colleagues’ (yes, not even that one). What does have merit is the product of our intellectual sweat, founded on solid theory and well-chosen evidence, leading to insights about how the world works that are both non-obvious and true. We’re pretty sure we have some of these at the LSE – otherwise we wouldn’t be here. But we’re equally sure that there’s a great deal that we, and the rest of the world, do not yet understand. The main point of academia – especially at the postgraduate level – is to distinguish what we know from what we don’t know, and to improve the tools we have for pushing back the darkness. In the latter especially, your help is crucial, because you are not invested in the tools and models that we currently have, and so are more likely to come up with creative new ones.

Welcome to the LSE. It’s going to be intense and frustrating at first. And then it’s going to be exhilarating. We’re delighted that you came.

 

Originally posted on the International Development at LSE blog in Feb 2014.

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: ,