Jul 17 2014

Student Experience: Consultancy project presentation at the Houses of Parliament

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Four MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies students outside Houses of Parliament after their presentation.

By Rebecca Brooks, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2013-14

On 24 June 2014, four students studying for the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies presented the findings of their consultancy project to an expert panel and a select audience at the Houses of Parliament.

One of the many exciting opportunities available to us on the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies is the DV443 Humanitarian Consultancy Project.
In teams of four or five, we are employed by a live client to produce a report on a problem clients may have, or an area of research they require. This allows us to gain practical experience of dealing with current policy issues and best practice in the field of humanitarian assistance. This year, consultancy clients included UNHCR, UNICEF, the Disasters Emergency Committee and International Alert.

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Jul 3 2014

Beyond Coffee Beans and Bamboo – A wake up call for transformative investment in Africa

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Chris Martin, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2011-12

Chris Martin, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2011-12

Like many pensive blog posts this one began as a trip to the supermarket… While searching for a bag of coffee, I stumbled upon a brand which loudly proclaimed that is was giving 50% of its revenues back to the African farmers who grew it. Initially, I thought, “At last, a fair trade initiative which is actually ‘fair.’” I managed to suppress my LSE-instilled scepticism of the ethical imagery of smiling Ugandan farmers and walked away with the makings of a great cup of coffee.

I did not reflect on this experience until a few weeks later when I came across an optimistic article in the Guardian on the boom of Ethiopian bamboo. The commentary lauded the trend for the potential foreign investment it could attract and environmentally sustainable alternatives it could produce. The article even suggested that the investment in bamboo production might spread to other African countries like Ghana. Continue reading

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Jun 26 2014

Student Experience: A Trip to Geneva

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Post by MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, Becky Brooks. 

In March this year, 34 students studying for the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies travelled to Geneva to visit various humanitarian organisations.

LSE Development students in Geneva 2

Dr Stuart Gordon and MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies students in Geneva.

 

Trekking across the beautiful city, we attended meetings at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the International Committee of the Red Cross, Medicine Sans Frontières, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue and Interpeace. Continue reading

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Jun 19 2014

Growth more than population control

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A letter from Dr Elliott Green, published in the Financial Times on 17 June 2014

Sir, Bachu Biswas (Letters, June 16) makes the classic mistake of thinking that controlling population will promote economic development independent of other factors.

To see how wrong this is one needs only look to Bangladesh, which has a population density of more than 1,000 people per square kilometre, or more than 2.5 times greater than that of India. Continue reading

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Jun 18 2014

Iraq Falling Apart

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Altiplano 8 (JP rock)Professor Jean Paul Faguet
Professor of the Political Economy of Development
Programme Director, Development Management

The speed and violence with which armed insurgents have overrun Iraqi towns and military posts, massacring civilians and spreading fear through the region, has shocked the world. For some years now we in the West have hoped for the best, and preferred not to look too hard at the country we invaded and took over, tried half-heartedly to re-build, and then abandoned.  But now our failure to replace dictatorship with a working democracy is clear. Continue reading

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Jun 3 2014

Working to Increase Backwards Linkages from Mining Investment

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Jeff Geipel in Burkina Faso (MSc Development Studies, 2011-2012)

Jeff Geipel in Burkina Faso (MSc Development Studies, 2011-2012)

During my MSc Development Studies degree at LSE, one of the topics that interested me most was Albert Hirschman’s concept of backwards linkages.  Briefly, he defined backward linkage effects as when the establishment of a new industry creates possibilities for local industries to expand production through the supply of inputs to the new entrant to the economy.  He argued that developing countries could benefit from creating backwards linkages whereby domestic enterprises would supply the operations of investing companies.

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May 21 2014

Reflections on the classics: ‘Exit, Voice and Loyalty’

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Deborah Doane

Deborah Doane (DESTIN, 1996/97)

I’m often asked by people embarking on a career in development , if my time spent at the LSE had any relevance to my current work.  I generally find this question peculiar.  For me, doing a master’s degree was an opportunity to expand my horizons and to learn; it wasn’t about furthering a career or whatnot.

Nonetheless, having spent the subsequent 17 years working in NGOs and think-tanks, I do occasionally reflect on my time in what was then known as DESTIN (now the Department of International Development).  From our Friday evening lectures, to heated seminar debates, who and what I heard did ultimately have a great deal of influence on my work. Continue reading

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May 14 2014

Illicit financial flows, security in Africa and #BringBackOurGirls

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alexcobhamGuest Post by Alex Cobham

Alex Cobham is a research fellow at the Center for Global Development in Europe. His research focuses on illicit financial flows, effective taxation for development, and inequality. Recent work includes a proposal, with Andy Sumner, for a new policy measure of inequality, the ‘Palma’. You can follow Alex on twitter @alexcobham.

 

A range of estimates of illicit financial flows confirm that the problem facing Africa is large, and has grown substantially. Annual losses in recent years range as high as $100 billion, and for many countries the long-term average has exceeded 10% of recorded GDP. Even allowing for substantial uncertainty in estimates of flows of which the defining characteristic is that they are hidden, the order of magnitude is dramatic – and so too is the potential damage. Continue reading

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May 7 2014

Student Experience: Sebastian Sahla, Development Management.

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Sebastian Sahla

Sebastian Sahla

During my Masters I spent one day a week as an intern with Global Witness – an NGO which campaigns against natural resource-related conflict and corruption around the world. The internship was my first opportunity to apply some of the theoretical knowledge I was acquiring during my degree in a professional context. Particularly the focus on the links between natural resources and conflict of courses like Complex Emergencies helped me make sense of some of the real-world problems I was encountering in my work. Continue reading

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Apr 30 2014

Economics, But Not as You Know It

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Ha-Joon Chang

Ha-Joon Chang

Department of International Development public lecture

Date: Thursday 1 May 2014
Time: 6.30-8pm  Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building
Speaker: Dr Ha-Joon Chang
Chair: Professor James Putzel

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