Sep 23 2014

Tim Forsyth: ‘Elinor Ostrom’s Legacy: Governing the Commons and the Rational Choice Controversy’

Leave a comment
forsyth

Professor Tim Forsyth

Professor Tim Forsyth discusses Elinor Ostrom’s legacy in the latest issue of Development and Change. Read the full article here.

Elinor Ostrom had a profound impact on development studies through her work on public choice, institutionalism and the commons. In 2009, she became the first — and so far, only — woman to win a Nobel Prize for Economics (a prize shared with Oliver Williamson). Moreover, she won this award as a political scientist, which caused controversy among some economists. She committed her professional life to expanding traditional economic thinking beyond questions of individualistic rational behaviour towards a greater understanding of self-regulating cooperative action within public policy. In particular, she organized the University of Indiana’s Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis with her husband, Vincent Ostrom, and the International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC). She also earned the reputation of a loyal and caring colleague and mentor. She donated much money to the University of Indiana, including her Nobel Prize money.

The purpose of this article is to identify and discuss Elinor Ostrom’s legacy in international development. Rather than being a simple obituary, this article also seeks to review the tensions arising from her work, especially concerning the debate about institutions and the commons, and particularly Ostrom’s own focus on rational choice theory and methodological individualism as a means of understanding cooperative behaviour.

Read this article in full at Development and Change, Volume 45, Issue 5, pages 1093–1110, September 2014.

 

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , ,

Sep 22 2014

Elliott Green spoke to Bloomberg radio about the Scottish Referendum

Leave a comment

 

Dr Elliott Green

Dr Elliott Green

Dr Elliott Green, Associate Professor in Development Studies in the Department of International Development spoke to Bloomberg radio on Friday 19th September about the Scottish Referendum. Listen to the full podcast here.

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , , , ,

Sep 18 2014

Scottish independence: David Cameron is becoming the ‘George Bush of Britain’

Leave a comment
Altiplano 8 (JP rock)

Professor Jean Paul Faguet

Professor Jean Paul Faguet
Professor of the Political Economy of Development
Programme Director, Development Management

Towards the end of 2008, a debate erupted amongst American historians and pundits about whether George W. Bush was the worst president of all time, or merely one of the worst. The case against him rested on a wilful, unnecessary foreign war born of lies that consumed thousands of American lives and untold wealth, and laid waste to poor, benighted Iraq.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , , ,

Sep 17 2014

Student Experience: Hands on the Balkans, a 10-day Conference in Serbia & Kosovo

Leave a comment
Melissa Carr and Ali Rae in Belgrade

Melissa Carr and Ali Rae in Belgrade

“Politics is a skill supported by knowledge.”
– Dusan Vasilijevic, Environmental Services Professional, Serbia.

While many postgraduate students were busy working on their dissertations, two LSE International Development students recently returned to London after undertaking a 10-day professional development conference in Serbia and Kosovo.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Aug 18 2014

Economic and political development under demi-sovereignty: the West Bank

Leave a comment
Professor Robert Wade

Professor Robert Wade

Recently I spent some days in the West Bank. I had not been to any of the territory once known as the Levant, between Anatolia and Egypt. But my research on economic and political development – or as Adam Smith would have said, the wealth of nations – has entailed long-term field-work in places from Pitcairn Island to Italy, India, South Korea, Taiwan and more. In these places I studied institutions and their incumbents, for tasks ranging from village-level management of common property resources (like irrigation and grazing) to the state-level implementation of industrial and technology policy. I encountered  the West Bank at the invitation of the Kenyon Institute, which arranges visits by British-based academics.  I gave several lectures, interviewed governmental and non-governmental officials and owners of small factories, and travelled across much of the territory. I was struck by the effects of the Israeli control system on conditions of Palestinian life at the capillary level, below the level of feuds and negotiations at the top.  This is a reflection on my experience.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds

Aug 12 2014

Brics bank ought to be welcomed by poorer countries

Leave a comment
Professor Robert Wade

Professor Robert Wade

From Professor Robert Wade and Dr Jakob Vestergaard, published by the Financial Times on 6th August, 2014.

Sir, David Pilling says, in The Brics bank is a glimpse of the future” (July 31), that “the world has changed, mostly for the better, as poor countries close the gap on rich ones”, and that the Brics bank is to be welcomed, because it will bring competition and bypasses the problem of the Bretton Woods organisations failing to expand the Brics’ governance voice in line with their growing weight in the world economy.     Read the full article at FT.com

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds

Jul 29 2014

International Development alumnus discusses green technology

Leave a comment

Anne McIvor graduated from the MSc Development Management programme in 1998. She went on to found Cleantech Investor, a consultancy service for clean technology companies seeking investment.

Read Anne’s interview in LSE Green News, where she talks about how studying International Development at LSE inspired her interest in green technology.

Picture1

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds

Jul 17 2014

Student Experience: Consultancy project presentation at the Houses of Parliament

Leave a comment
BAAG-group-2-2014-small

Four MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies students outside Houses of Parliament after their presentation.

By Rebecca Brooks, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2013-14

On 24 June 2014, four students studying for the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies presented the findings of their consultancy project to an expert panel and a select audience at the Houses of Parliament.

One of the many exciting opportunities available to us on the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies is the DV443 Humanitarian Consultancy Project.
In teams of four or five, we are employed by a live client to produce a report on a problem clients may have, or an area of research they require. This allows us to gain practical experience of dealing with current policy issues and best practice in the field of humanitarian assistance. This year, consultancy clients included UNHCR, UNICEF, the Disasters Emergency Committee and International Alert.

Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Ingrina Carson Tagged with: , , , ,

Jul 3 2014

Beyond Coffee Beans and Bamboo – A wake up call for transformative investment in Africa

Leave a comment
Chris Martin, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2011-12

Chris Martin, MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, 2011-12

Like many pensive blog posts this one began as a trip to the supermarket… While searching for a bag of coffee, I stumbled upon a brand which loudly proclaimed that is was giving 50% of its revenues back to the African farmers who grew it. Initially, I thought, “At last, a fair trade initiative which is actually ‘fair.’” I managed to suppress my LSE-instilled scepticism of the ethical imagery of smiling Ugandan farmers and walked away with the makings of a great cup of coffee.

I did not reflect on this experience until a few weeks later when I came across an optimistic article in the Guardian on the boom of Ethiopian bamboo. The commentary lauded the trend for the potential foreign investment it could attract and environmentally sustainable alternatives it could produce. The article even suggested that the investment in bamboo production might spread to other African countries like Ghana. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds Tagged with: , , ,

Jun 26 2014

Student Experience: A Trip to Geneva

Leave a comment

Post by MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, Becky Brooks. 

In March this year, 34 students studying for the MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies travelled to Geneva to visit various humanitarian organisations.

LSE Development students in Geneva 2

Dr Stuart Gordon and MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies students in Geneva.

 

Trekking across the beautiful city, we attended meetings at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the International Committee of the Red Cross, Medicine Sans Frontières, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue and Interpeace. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Sarah Edmonds