Fieldwork and Travel

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    Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Sylvia Cesar, MSc Development Management 2017-2018, summarises her recently published article titled ‘Privatization of Water: Evaluating its Performance in the Developing World’. 

The 1990s Washington Consensus and structural adjustment recommendations have been widely criticized in the International Development sphere for several reasons. The literature has indicated that the social and political context in which these neo-liberal economic policies were implemented […]

The Risks of Hardened Borders in North Africa

Max Gallien and Matt Herbert comment on the risks of tightening border security between North African countries, where communities depend on smuggling cheap goods.
Over the past several years, North African countries have worked to heavily fortify their borders. A 200-kilometer (125-mile) trench, completed in February 2016, runs along the Tunisian–Libyan border. Twelve hundred kilometers (746 miles) to the west, two […]

Veni, vedi, quite a lot of vinci in the Bosphorus

Professor of Political Economy, Robert Wade, tells us about his swam across the Bosphorus for the From Asia to Europe open water swimming race. 

From Robert Wade, 23 July 2018:   

Returned to London last night from a quick two-day visit to Istanbul.  Purpose was to swim in the “From Asia to Europe” “race”, 6.5 kms. Event is organized once a year (this the […]

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    An experiment in participatory blogging on Ebola in Sierra Leone

An experiment in participatory blogging on Ebola in Sierra Leone

Professor in Practice Duncan Green interviews Professor Tim Allen and Melissa Parker to find out how and why they published a blog post ‘co-authored’ by the people of Mathiane, an Ebola affected village in Sierra Leone. 

Anthropologists do things differently, including blogging. My attention was piqued by Tim Allen’s reply to a commenter on his recent post (with Melissa Parker) on Ebola in Sierra Leone, in which he casually […]

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    LSE Development Management Students Team Up with the IDB in Haiti

LSE Development Management Students Team Up with the IDB in Haiti

MSc Development Management students Ben Gebhardt, Sharon Sagues, Cristina Viladomiu and Gen Kawasaki, tell us about their trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where they researched the city’s creative sectors as a means of economic growth.

The research trip informed the group’s Development Management consultancy project with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). 

In the past couple of decades, the international development community has paid […]

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    Top tips on how to get a reply to your emails – Duncan Green

Top tips on how to get a reply to your emails – Duncan Green

Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, shares some useful tips on how to get your emails answered.
Some of my LSE students are pulling their hair out. A number of them are doing consultancies for various bits of the aid industry. They have composed their requests for interviews, links, suggestions etc, hit ‘send’ and then…. Silence.

So short of doorstepping the unresponsive (which […]

Connectivity at the Bottom of the Pyramid

Dr Laura Mann presents the Connectivity at the Bottom of the Pyramid White Paper, co-written with Dr Kate Meagher. The White Paper follows on from a workshop held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Centre in 2016, which brought together stakeholders to address the challenges of digital inclusion for workers at the bottom of the pyramid in Africa.

Last year, my colleague Kate Meagher and I organised a conference at the Rockefeller […]

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    The broken promise of solar cooking? The case of Goudoubo Refugee Camp

The broken promise of solar cooking? The case of Goudoubo Refugee Camp

Recent Msc in Environmental Policy and Regulation graduate, Isabella Troconis, tells us about her dissertation research on the potential of solar cooking in the Goudoubo Refugee Camp in Burkina Faso. 

(Featured image: Demonstration of blazing tube use in Saag-Nionigo camp (c) UNHCR 2015)

Can you imagine taking an average of five hours to cook just one meal or walking 20 km a day to get […]

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    What can other cities learn from Mexico City’s bike-sharing scheme?

What can other cities learn from Mexico City’s bike-sharing scheme?

Recent graduate in MSc Development Management, Naima von Ritter Figueres, investigates the success of Mexico City’s EcoBici Bike Sharing Scheme, which systematically broke down social barriers to provide opportunities of introducing the new mode of public transport, and questions if a similar approach could be applied in other megacities around the world. 

Most cities over the past few decades have been shaped by the […]

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    Politics and the cross-continental swim, Asia to Europe, at Istanbul: dangerous currents in both

Politics and the cross-continental swim, Asia to Europe, at Istanbul: dangerous currents in both

Professor Robert Wade travelled to Istanbul in late July 2017 to take part in the annual cross-continental 6.5 km swim “race” along the Bosphorus. Here he describes his experience as a participant in the race, as well as his time in a country that is going through great political change. 

I am hardly a long-distance swimmer, but I have been […]

August 22nd, 2017|Fieldwork and Travel, News from the Department, Topical and Comment|Comments Off on Politics and the cross-continental swim, Asia to Europe, at Istanbul: dangerous currents in both|