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    The HDI’s the Limit: Imagining a More Inclusive Measure for Development in India

The HDI’s the Limit: Imagining a More Inclusive Measure for Development in India

According to the Human Development Index (HDI), India fell one place on the list of country rankings. MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies Candidate, Emma Smith, explains why the HDI falls short in measuring development, and why India might be doing better than we think. 

India is a country that saw rapid 7.1% growth in GDP in 2016 alone. Yet as An Uncertain […]

The Great Development Discussion

On Thursday 22nd March 2018, MSc Development and Anthropology students were encouraged to join, participate and laugh in the Great Development Discussion. Professor Jean-Paul Faguet chaired this showdown between International Development and Anthropology professors. Proudly representing Development was our econometrics guru Dr Diana Weinhold, alongside the infamous Teddy Brett. From Anthropology were Professors Katy Gardner and Laura Bear. Msc Development Management Student Lucy White tells us how the […]

Challenging the wisdom of ‘more globalisation’

Professor Robert Wade responds to the recent article for the Financial Times by the chief economic adviser to the Government of India, Arvind Subramanian’s, in which he claims the golden age of globalisation is now behind us…  

 

26 April 2018 

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Arvind Subramanian is correct that today’s workers in developing countries face a tougher market for converging in living conditions with counterparts in developed countries than did those […]

Because we let it happen

Development Studies student, Anushna Jha, shares a few lines in response to the horrific news of the brutal death of an 8 year old girl in her home country of India:
An 8-year-old was raped, tortured, killed
Because we let this happen
Because we have reduced cases of sexual violence to breaking news and primetime debates
Because we have normalised sexism and misogyny and […]

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    The economic contributions of artisanal & small–scale mining in Kenya: gold and gemstones

The economic contributions of artisanal & small–scale mining in Kenya: gold and gemstones

Martin Namasaka investigates the potential economic opportunity that small-scale mining can provide in Kenya. 

Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) activities have been a significant source of employment for Kenyans, playing a critical role in poverty reduction and rural development. Even so, limited data and information has been available concerning the current and potential economic development opportunity that the small-scale mining sector […]

Why is nobody talking about prisons?

Alumnus and 2017 MSc Development Management graduate, Debora Zampier, investigates why the crises in prison management are neglected by state policy, and uses Brazil as a case study to offer alternative ways to approach the subject that takes authority, incentives and accountability (AIA) mechanisms into consideration.

This research has been summarised from her Master’s thesis, ‘Nobody’s fault’: investigating institutional causes of prisons’ mismanagment, which was […]

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    An experiment in participatory blogging on Ebola in Sierra Leone

An experiment in participatory blogging on Ebola in Sierra Leone

Professor in Practice Duncan Green interviews Professor Tim Allen and Melissa Parker to find out how and why they published a blog post ‘co-authored’ by the people of Mathiane, an Ebola affected village in Sierra Leone. 

Anthropologists do things differently, including blogging. My attention was piqued by Tim Allen’s reply to a commenter on his recent post (with Melissa Parker) on Ebola in Sierra Leone, in which he casually […]

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    What Does the Rise of Populism Mean for International Development?

What Does the Rise of Populism Mean for International Development?

Graduate student, Shahrukh Wani, examines how the rise in populism has affected the development sector, and suggests ways of moving forward. 

We live in interesting times. Few of us had the foresight to predict that a billionaire real estate developer would become the face of an anti-elite crusade, an Eton and Oxford educated parliamentarian would attack aid to the world’s poorest, and […]

Putting Happiness into Public Policy

Guest blogger, Paul Anand, Professor of Economics at the Open University, tells us about the Global Wellbeing Report which launches today, on the International Day of Happiness.

Sensible people often roll their eyes at the thought of all that fluffy happiness nonsense impacting policy until they recall that its absence is the direct cause of a range or rather unpleasant events […]

Logging into blogging

Development Studies student Anushna Jha shares with us her list of “10 things to keep in mind whilst blogging” following an intimate blog writing session with professor in practice and blogger Duncan Green (@fp2p). 

Last week, we had an interactive session with Professor Duncan Green, who takes our course on Advocacy, Grassroots Activism and Campaign here at the LSE and is […]