Topical and Comment

  • Permalink Gallery

    The dark side of a successful developmental state: Singapore’s socioeconomic dilemma

The dark side of a successful developmental state: Singapore’s socioeconomic dilemma

Alumna and 2017 Winner of the Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance in MSc Development Management, Agnes Chew, examines the dark side of a successful development state with Singapore as a case study, investigating the current socioeconomic dilemma faced in terms of growth, inequality, and societal wellbeing.

This article is based on her prizewinning dissertation titled “The Hidden Costs […]

Professor Tim Dyson on a population history of India

Tim Dyson, Professor of Population Studies in the Department of International Development at LSE, tells us about his new book, A Population History of India: From the First Modern People to the Present Day.

Six years ago, I sat at my desk with a period of sabbatical leave stretching before me. There were several topics which I might have researched, but […]

An unlikely combination that may help us move on

Professor Robert Wade adds to the recent article from Rana Foroohar for the Financial Times: 

03 October 2018   

………………

Rana Foroohar is right to say that president Donald Trump’s trade policy is a response to fundamental flaws in the world trade and investment system (“Time to grapple with global trade”, October 1).

The present rules press all sizable economies to adopt free or almost free […]

The Risks of a Looming Energy Transition

Joachim Roth, sustainability analyst and department alum, investigates the geopolitics of the inevitable global energy transition. 

With the prospect of the energy transition looming, there is a need to analyze what the geopolitical implications of such a shift could be. Although there is no universal definition of what geopolitics stands for it can be interpreted in relation to the energy […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Sylvia Cesar, MSc Development Management 2017-2018, summarises her recently published article titled ‘Privatization of Water: Evaluating its Performance in the Developing World’. 

The 1990s Washington Consensus and structural adjustment recommendations have been widely criticized in the International Development sphere for several reasons. The literature has indicated that the social and political context in which these neo-liberal economic policies were implemented […]

Combating the learning crisis in South Asia

Amongst a range of development challenges that South Asian countries face is poor education, with only around half of primary aged children receiving education within the minimum learning standards framework. International Development students, Anushna Jha and Mehrin Shah, explain why learning must be placed at the centre of education and students in order to combat this crisis.  

Amongst a range of development challenges […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis

The impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis

A recent publication from Dr Stuart Gordon, Alice Robinson and Harry Goulding from the LSE, reveals the impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis. The publication was written in collaboration with Rawaad Mahyub, Executive Director of the Humanitarian Forum, for the Humanitarian Policy Group. 

The Syrian crisis is a complex environment for aid agencies wishing to […]

The Risks of Hardened Borders in North Africa

Max Gallien and Matt Herbert comment on the risks of tightening border security between North African countries, where communities depend on smuggling cheap goods.
Over the past several years, North African countries have worked to heavily fortify their borders. A 200-kilometer (125-mile) trench, completed in February 2016, runs along the Tunisian–Libyan border. Twelve hundred kilometers (746 miles) to the west, two […]

For African governments to intervene is reasonable

Managing Director for Mining Shared Value and department alumnus, Jeff Geipel responds to Peter Leon’s recent editorial for the Financial Times.  

4  September 2018   

………………

Peter Leon’s editorial “African nations must resist siren song of resource nationalism” (August 29) is a very problematic piece that cherry-picks outlier examples to attack what is a completely reasonable trend for African governments to intervene more in the mining sector […]

Toxic air: the fatal cost of industrial growth

Dr Amit Chandra, MSc Development Studies alum, and Dr. Sutyajeet Soneja, air pollution and public health expert, outline the fatal costs of toxic air.

As the perennial blanket of smog that envelops New Delhi intensified in November 2017, India’s Minister of Environment Harsh Vardhan urged his people to remain calm, stating “no death certificate has the cause of death as pollution.” The physician and […]