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    How does DFID work with non-state power holders in conflict zones?

How does DFID work with non-state power holders in conflict zones?

Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, interviews DFID’s Wilf Mwamba about how donors understand and work with non-state power holders, like armed groups, faith organisations and traditional chiefs, in fragile places?

One of the highlights of the recent conference on accountability and empowerment in fragile/conflict states was hanging out with a true ‘development entrepreneur’, Wilf Mwamba. Wilf, a rising star in DFID, set up […]

Global playing field is level but only for the west

Professor Robert Wade adds to the recent article from Dani Rodrik for the Financial Times, in which he states that the US and Europe are hypocritical when complaining about China’s infringement on ‘global norms and rules’. 

8  August 2018   

………………

Dani Rodrik, in “Global trade needs rules that adapt to economic diversity”, misses an important point ( August 6).

He says that “when the US and Europe […]

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    Digital Disruption?: The role of ICTs in reshaping African capitalism and catalysing development

Digital Disruption?: The role of ICTs in reshaping African capitalism and catalysing development

MSc African Development students, Jon Rothwell and Faith Mwachinga, discuss the need for a robust policy framework that captures the efficiency gains and commercial advantages attributed to Africa’s digital transformation.

The rapid digitization of African economies has resulted in increased optimism around the transformative nature of ICTs and their ability to enable developing countries to successfully integrate into the global economy. However, whether these […]

Between Authoritarianism and Democracy

In a recent article for Political Violence at a Glance, Alexander Beresford (University of Leeds), Marie E. Berry (University of Denver) and Laura Mann (LSE) summarise their recent paper: Liberation movements and stalled democratic transitions: reproducing power in Rwanda and South Africa through productive liminality. 

For decades, political scientists have debated whether democracy is spreading or receding on the global stage. While recent trends suggest […]

An open letter from fifteen leading development economists

In a recent open letter on The Guardian Online, fifteen leading economists, including LSE Professor of Gender and Development, Naila Kabeer, argue that relying on randomised control trials to guide aid spending will lead to short-term, superficial and misplaced policies.

Development efforts over the past few decades have not been as effective as promised.

Global poverty remains intractable: more than 4 billion people […]

The Future of AIDS Treatment: A Commentary

Professor Ken Shadlen provides a short commentary on Laurie Garrett’s short essay on the future of the AIDS pandemic, “Welcome to the Next Deadly AIDS Pandemic,” which was published in Foreign Policy last week.

As of 2000, less than five percent of people with HIV/AIDS in developing countries received treatment. Now, substantially greater than 50 percent receive antiretroviral therapy. What was a […]

Elite Return Migration and Development in India

MSc Social Policy and Development Alumnus, Aishu Balaji, explains why the return of Indian migrants back to their motherland is not having the development impact initially intended. 

In a 2015 address to Indian migrants in California, Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared, “India is waiting for you”, suggesting they must seize the “opportunity to serve Mother India … whenever the opportunity comes”. […]

Veni, vedi, quite a lot of vinci in the Bosphorus

Professor of Political Economy, Robert Wade, tells us about his swam across the Bosphorus for the From Asia to Europe open water swimming race. 

From Robert Wade, 23 July 2018:   

Returned to London last night from a quick two-day visit to Istanbul.  Purpose was to swim in the “From Asia to Europe” “race”, 6.5 kms. Event is organized once a year (this the […]

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    Africans winning the World Cup? What ‘decolonisation by integration’ could teach us about black French identity

Africans winning the World Cup? What ‘decolonisation by integration’ could teach us about black French identity

Following claims that Africa actually won the 2018 FIFA World Cup, students Arbie Baguios (MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies), Ynis Isimbi (Msc Development Studies) and David Yamron (MSc Development Management) explore the French identity and their colonial past. 

France just won the World Cup. But the fact that at least 15 players out of their 23-strong team are of African descent […]

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    What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

Guest bloggers Saleemul Huq, International Centre for Climate Change and Development, and David Lewis, Department of Social Policy at the LSE, suggest a new future for UK-Bangladesh relations once Bangladesh graduates from a Least Developed Country to a Middle Income Country in 2021. 

Ever since Bangladesh became an independent country in December 1971 the United Kingdom has been a major development partner. For the […]