aid

An open letter from fifteen leading development economists

In a recent open letter on The Guardian Online, fifteen leading economists, including LSE Professor of Gender and Development, Naila Kabeer, argue that relying on randomised control trials to guide aid spending will lead to short-term, superficial and misplaced policies.

Development efforts over the past few decades have not been as effective as promised.

Global poverty remains intractable: more than 4 billion people […]

  • Permalink Flower petal covered footpath in Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh Gallery

    What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

Guest bloggers Saleemul Huq, International Centre for Climate Change and Development, and David Lewis, Department of Social Policy at the LSE, suggest a new future for UK-Bangladesh relations once Bangladesh graduates from a Least Developed Country to a Middle Income Country in 2021. 

Ever since Bangladesh became an independent country in December 1971 the United Kingdom has been a major development partner. For the […]

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    What Does the Rise of Populism Mean for International Development?

What Does the Rise of Populism Mean for International Development?

Graduate student, Shahrukh Wani, examines how the rise in populism has affected the development sector, and suggests ways of moving forward. 

We live in interesting times. Few of us had the foresight to predict that a billionaire real estate developer would become the face of an anti-elite crusade, an Eton and Oxford educated parliamentarian would attack aid to the world’s poorest, and […]

  • Permalink Radi-Aid Awards 2017 winner for Rusty-Radiator, Ed Sheeran Meets a Little Boy Who Lives on the Streets – Comic ReliefGallery

    To regain public trust, the aid sector needs Vox-style explainers and an ad watchdog

To regain public trust, the aid sector needs Vox-style explainers and an ad watchdog

MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies student, Arbie Baguios, proposes a radical structural solution to bridging the knowledge gap between the aid sector and the public. 

Bond recently published an article that diagnosed a problem the international aid sector faces: the public’s declining trust, and increased scrutiny and suspicion. Their prescription, however, may be less acute: “Emotion is the way […]

  • Permalink Syrian refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, located 10 km east of Mafraq, Jordan on March 27, 2016. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World BankGallery

    The economics of humanitarian aid: Are we on a slippery slope? – Dr Stephanie Levy

The economics of humanitarian aid: Are we on a slippery slope? – Dr Stephanie Levy

Could the current modalities of humanitarian aid to refugees be improved? Dr. Stephanie Levy argues for more creative aid agreements to form the backbone of the global response to the current refugee crisis, in a post originally written for the International Growth Centre.

At the World Humanitarian Summit (WH Summit), David Miliband, head of the International Rescue Committee, announced that 25% […]

  • World Bank/IMF Annual Meetings 2009. Opening plenary session. Istanbul, Turkey. October 6, 2009 (via World Bank Photo Collection on Flickr. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
    Permalink World Bank/IMF Annual Meetings 2009. Opening plenary session. Istanbul, Turkey. October 6, 2009 (via World Bank Photo Collection on Flickr. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Gallery

    Aid Relationships, Global Governance and the International Crisis – Professor Teddy Brett

Aid Relationships, Global Governance and the International Crisis – Professor Teddy Brett

The unity and stability of the global economic system has always depended on aid relationships that sustain the concessional transfers that ameliorate the threats generated by economic, political and humanitarian crises, uneven development and environmental degradation. These transfers depend on discretionary exchanges between sovereign governments, multilateral agencies and civic organisations and individuals, but they also constitute a partially coordinated […]

Is National Interest a Threat to Aid? – Duncan Green

Duncan Green, Professor in Practice at LSE, questions how UK Aid can pursue development and British National Interest at the same time. Originally posted on From Poverty to Power. The British aid programme is in an interesting place right now. The British chancellor (finance minister) George Osborne is overseeing a tense spending review in which aid is protected thanks to the government’s […]

  • Graph And Stacks. Photo Credit: Ken Teegartin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/teegardin/6093690339/) License: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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    How can INGOs get better? Duncan Green’s ‘surprisingly interesting’ conversation with finance directors

How can INGOs get better? Duncan Green’s ‘surprisingly interesting’ conversation with finance directors

Spent an afternoon with a bunch of NGO Finance Directors this week. I was presenting Fit for the Future (memo to self, never write another paper about the future of INGOs – their thirst for navel-gazing is limitless). The discussion was more interesting than you might think – money is the lifeblood of the aid business, and FDs have the best […]

Here’s a simple way to help refugees: give them cash

Cash payments may help millions who decide not to head for Europe in this time of urgent need. Professor in Practice Owen Barder writes for the Telegraph. The tragic reality faced by millions of people fleeing Syrian conflict were driven home this week as we were confronted with images three-year-old Aylan Kurdi, who drowned when the boat carrying his family […]

  • We Are Victims (Calais Crisis) Photo credit: Jey OH photographie, via Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jey-oh/14320742956/). Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.
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    Calais migrant response overblown – Ruben Andersson on BBC Radio Scotland

Calais migrant response overblown – Ruben Andersson on BBC Radio Scotland

David Cameron recently described the ongoing migrant crisis in Calais as “totally unacceptable” and called an emergency cobra meeting. Speaking to BBC Radio Scotland, Dr Ruben Andersson described the reaction to the current scenario in Calais as disproportionate and ineffective. Kris Gulati explains. Many hoped that the fall of the Berlin Wall would bring an end to the sorts of […]