Duncan Green

  • Passport out of poverty? A woman helped by the BRAC programme with the cow the project gave her.
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    How assets + training can transform the lives of ultra-poor women: new evidence from Bangladesh – Duncan Green

How assets + training can transform the lives of ultra-poor women: new evidence from Bangladesh – Duncan Green

People are often very rude about ‘big push’ approaches to development – the idea that you can kickstart a country. The approach has been pioneered by Bangladeshi development organisation BRAC, which aims to help households escape extreme poverty by supporting women to set up their own small businesses. BRAC provides both assets and skills training for some of the poorest […]

  • Keep Up and Blog On. Photo credit: Alexander Baxevanis, via Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/futureshape/4977096245/). Licence: CC BY 2.0.
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    Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously – Duncan Green

Why academics (and students) should take blogging / social media seriously – Duncan Green

Before I started teaching at LSE in January, I had the impression that the academics and researchers around the school were totally social media savvy – prolific tweeters like Charlie Beckett and top blogs like LSE Impact are high up on my follow list. It turned out the impression was, ahem, a little misleading. A good proportion of the people […]

Is National Interest a Threat to Aid? – Duncan Green

Duncan Green, Professor in Practice at LSE, questions how UK Aid can pursue development and British National Interest at the same time. Originally posted on From Poverty to Power. The British aid programme is in an interesting place right now. The British chancellor (finance minister) George Osborne is overseeing a tense spending review in which aid is protected thanks to the government’s […]

  • Winnie Byanyima, Duncan Green
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    Africa is rising – but for whom? Winnie Byanyima captivates a full house at LSE

Africa is rising – but for whom? Winnie Byanyima captivates a full house at LSE

Times are changing, and so too must charities. After 75 years in Oxford, Oxfam International will soon be relocating its headquarters to Nairobi, the charity’s executive director Winnie Byanyima announced last night.   Addressing a sold-out Old Theatre, Ms Byanyima spoke about her experience growing up in Uganda and the problems that still beset the continent, before announcing that the […]

October 13th, 2015|Events, Featured|14 Comments|
  • Professor Angus Deyton
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    Response to Angus Deaton’s award of the Nobel Prize in Economics

Response to Angus Deaton’s award of the Nobel Prize in Economics

Faculty members in the Department of International Development respond to the news that Angus Deaton of Princeton University has been named the 2015 winner of the Nobel prize in economics. Elliott Green For the past two years I have used Angus Deaton’s latest book, The Great Escape: Health, Wealth and the Origins of Inequality (Princeton University Press, 2013) as the […]

Welcome to the LSE. It’s not for the faint-hearted.

The Department of International Development extends a very warm welcome to our incoming students. We’re delighted that you’ve joined us. Whether you’ve arrived fresh from your first degree or as a mid-career professional, you’ve been offered a highly coveted place here because you have demonstrated the capabilities that will allow you to thrive and to benefit from our rigorous MSc […]

  • Graph And Stacks. Photo Credit: Ken Teegartin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/teegardin/6093690339/) License: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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    How can INGOs get better? Duncan Green’s ‘surprisingly interesting’ conversation with finance directors

How can INGOs get better? Duncan Green’s ‘surprisingly interesting’ conversation with finance directors

Spent an afternoon with a bunch of NGO Finance Directors this week. I was presenting Fit for the Future (memo to self, never write another paper about the future of INGOs – their thirst for navel-gazing is limitless). The discussion was more interesting than you might think – money is the lifeblood of the aid business, and FDs have the best […]

  • Poverty in Kerala. Photo credit: Silvia Masiero
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    What difference do remittances and migration make back home? Duncan Green selects from the Economist

What difference do remittances and migration make back home? Duncan Green selects from the Economist

Reading the Economist cover to cover is an illicit pleasure – it may be irritatingly smug and right wing, especially on anything about economic policy, but its coverage on international issues consistently goes way beyond standard news outlets. This week’s edition had everything from the changing face of Indian marriage to the spread of pedestrian and cycling schemes around the […]

  • MSc Development Management Class of 2014-15
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    Aid agency ex-staff are a huge wasted asset – Duncan Green on the value of alumni

Aid agency ex-staff are a huge wasted asset – Duncan Green on the value of alumni

I regularly hear from friends who have been cold called by their old university, seeking to extract money from them for the alma mater (apparently hungry current students are particularly convincing). That got me thinking – how come aid organizations don’t do more with their alumni? (Originally published on From Poverty to Power.) Because Exfam staff (as we call them) […]

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    The Politics of Evidence and Results in International Development: “Important new book”, says Duncan Green

The Politics of Evidence and Results in International Development: “Important new book”, says Duncan Green

Rosalind Eyben, Irene Guijt, Chris Roche and Cathy Shutt (eds.), The Politics of Evidence and Results in International Development: Playing the Game to Change the Rules (Rugby: Practical Action Publishing, 2015). 234 pp. ISBN: 9781853398865 The results/value for money steamroller grinds on, with aid donors demanding more attention to measurement of impact. At first sight that’s a good thing – […]