poverty

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    Gambling with Demography: Investor Confidence and Islamic Values in Nigeria

Gambling with Demography: Investor Confidence and Islamic Values in Nigeria

Kate Meagher, associate professor in LSE’s Department of International Development, demonstrates why poverty, not cultural values, is the key driver behind Nigeria’s demographic tsunami.

A recent article in the Financial Times on 13 October 2016 drew attention to the looming crisis of falling oil prices and rapid population growth in Nigeria. Under the dramatic headline Dividend or disaster, the article suggests […]

A natural solution: environmental solutions to displacement

Nassim Majidi discusses linkages between environment and displacement, stemming from a plenary session held at the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) in Nairobi in May 2016. Displacement challenges in Somalia – and other settings, such as Afghanistan – raise critical questions on the role and potential of the environment.
On 25 May 2016, at the UNEA session on Environment and […]

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    Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda

Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda

In his latest article Dr Elliott Green looks at the role of “Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda”. Below is a summary of the article, the full text can be found in the journal Economic Development and Cultural Change
The role of precolonial history on contemporary development has become an important field of study within development economics. In particular […]

Book Review: The Economics of Poverty by Martin Ravallion

In a post for From Poverty to Power, Oxfam inequality number cruncher Deborah Hardoon reviews The Economics of Poverty by Martin Ravallion. 

It’s hard to think of a better placed individual than Martin Ravallion to have written this book. Not only has he spent over 30 years working on poverty, including 24 years at the World Bank, but in 1990 it […]

  • Hoe farming, common in so many African countries, needs to become a thing of the past Credit: International Institute of Tropical Agriculture via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1VqOtoa) CC BY-NC 2.0
    Permalink Hoe farming, common in so many African countries, needs to become a thing of the past Credit: International Institute of Tropical Agriculture via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1VqOtoa) CC BY-NC 2.0Gallery

    Duncan Green: Fascinating new research on how food prices affect people’s lives and politics

Duncan Green: Fascinating new research on how food prices affect people’s lives and politics

LSE International Development Professor in Practice Duncan Green talks about the findings of Oxfam’s  Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility project
One of the projects I was proudest of getting off the ground while in (nominal) charge of Oxfam’s research team was ‘Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility’, a four year study of the impact of the chaotic […]

  • Zona Sur area of La Paz. Photo credit: Matthew Straubmuller, via Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/imatty35/8292682199/). Licence: (CC BY 2.0).
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    Bolivia after the Boom: Are Hard Times Coming? Q&A with Jean-Paul Faguet

Bolivia after the Boom: Are Hard Times Coming? Q&A with Jean-Paul Faguet

I’m currently visiting Bolivia for the LACEA 2015 conference, and also giving a series of lectures in La Paz and Santa Cruz associated with my new book. I first lived here in the mid-1990s, and got to know the country well. Bolivia is transformed since then; the changes are breathtaking. The country is vastly richer, its political establishment has been […]

  • World Humanitarian Day 2013 (Photo Credit: Mathias Eick EU/ECHO, via Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/9550536671/) License: Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)
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    “On World Humanitarian Day: Could We Do Better with Cash?” asks Owen Barder

“On World Humanitarian Day: Could We Do Better with Cash?” asks Owen Barder

This post on World Humanitarian Day from LSE Professor in Practice, Owen Barder, first appeared on Views from the Center. This week we mark a poignant anniversary. August 19th was named World Humanitarian Day in memory of the bombing twelve years ago of the UN mission in Iraq, killing 22 people including the UN Special Representative, Sérgio Vieira de Mello. World Humanitarian […]

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    Jason Hickel – The Microfinance Delusion: who really wins?

Jason Hickel – The Microfinance Delusion: who really wins?

Far from being a panacea, small loans add to poverty and undermine people by saddling them with unsustainable debt, Jason Hickel (Dept. Anthropology) tells the Guardian. I’m always amazed at how many students show up each year in the classrooms of the London School of Economics, where I teach, quivering with excitement about microfinance and other “bottom-of-the-pyramid” development strategies. Like […]

Introducing the MSc Development Studies – James Putzel

Throughout the next week, we’re going to share some new introductory videos for the four MSc courses. Today, we start with Development Studies. Are you a past or present MSc Development Studies student? Have you enjoyed the course? Would you recommend it to interested students? Let us know by leaving a comment below!

Beyond China and India – Danny Quah

Asia may be thriving, but it still faces real economic constraints and governance challenges. Danny Quah argues that the region needs to be understood as a whole if these issues are to be addressed. Two-thirds of humanity is Asian. This includes the populations of not just the world’s only two-billion-people economies – China and India – but also tiny nation-states […]