uganda

Between Authoritarianism and Democracy

In a recent article for Political Violence at a Glance, Alexander Beresford (University of Leeds), Marie E. Berry (University of Denver) and Laura Mann (LSE) summarise their recent paper: Liberation movements and stalled democratic transitions: reproducing power in Rwanda and South Africa through productive liminality. 

For decades, political scientists have debated whether democracy is spreading or receding on the global stage. While recent trends suggest […]

New Book: After Rape by Dr Holly Porter

On Tuesday the 9th of May, Dr Holly Porter will be launching her new book, After Rape: Violence, Justice, and Social Harmony in Uganda, at The London School of Economics. 

Following the ICC intervention in 2005, northern Uganda has been at the heart of international justice debates. The emergent controversy, however, missed crucial aspects of Acholi realities: that the primary […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda

Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda

In his latest article Dr Elliott Green looks at the role of “Precolonial Political Centralization and Contemporary Development in Uganda”. Below is a summary of the article, the full text can be found in the journal Economic Development and Cultural Change
The role of precolonial history on contemporary development has become an important field of study within development economics. In particular […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    UN International Mother Language Day – Africa Educational Trust on the importance of teaching children in their mother language

UN International Mother Language Day – Africa Educational Trust on the importance of teaching children in their mother language

Sunday 21 February is UN International Mother Language Day. To mark this event the Africa Educational Trust have written a post for the LSE International Development blog outlining why education in mother tongue languages is socially, economically and politically important to children across the world.
An innovative programme in Ugandan schools is showing how mother tongue languages can be harnessed […]

  • Students from the 2014/15 PfAL@LSE cohort Credit: Owen Billcliffe Photography (owenbillcliffe.co.uk)
    Permalink Students from the 2014/15 PfAL@LSE cohort Credit: Owen Billcliffe Photography (owenbillcliffe.co.uk)Gallery

    Africa at LSE: Inaugural LSE PfAL Forum takes place in Kampala in January 2016

Africa at LSE: Inaugural LSE PfAL Forum takes place in Kampala in January 2016

Youth empowerment and promoting African intellectualism will be the subjects under discussion at the inaugural LSE PfAL Forum which takes place in Kampala, Uganda on 14 and 15 January 2016.

The PfAL Forum 2016 – which will be opened by Professor Tim Allen, Director of the new LSE Africa Centre – is a two-day event bringing together the members of the LSE […]

Justice in the world’s most difficult places – JSRP

Dr Anna Macdonald introduces the Justice and Security Research Programme’s newly published Special Issue on the local realities of law and justice. Reposted from the JSRP. How people living in the world’s most difficult places – the poorest, most politically fragile and conflict-affected environments – seek redress, justice and social order is important both for them and for the world […]

September 10th, 2015|Featured, Publications|0 Comments|

Get on the Ground: Tim Allen on the importance of fieldwork

In the following interview, published last year in The Economist, Tim Allen talks about the importance of fieldwork, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), and combatting ignorance in the international community. You are passionate about the importance of fieldwork in international development. Yes. Once a year I try to spend some months in the field in African villages. In the past […]

  • Karl Muth
    Permalink Gallery

    The paradoxical “selfishness” of aid – Karl Muth on stifling development

The paradoxical “selfishness” of aid – Karl Muth on stifling development

“Why do certain countries develop?” asks Karl Muth, a recent PhD graduate and now Lecturer in Economics, Public Policy and Statistics at Northwestern University. In his TEDx talk, ‘International Development – Telling New Stories’, he delivers a complex answer derived from an anecdote that stems from fieldwork in Uganda.

  • No Wealth From Child Sacrifice (Credit: BBC)
    Permalink Gallery

    “Child sacrifice is pervasive!?” Tim Allen tackles the BBC on Uganda

“Child sacrifice is pervasive!?” Tim Allen tackles the BBC on Uganda

In 2010, Professor Tim Allen attacked the BBC’s “misleading” and “misinformed” coverage of Uganda in a Newsnight documentary. Kris Gulati revisits the battle between anthropologists and public broadcasters. [Part of the documentary is also available to watch here] In 2010, the BBC released this documentary claiming that child sacrifice was widespread throughout Uganda. It created uproar among British anthropologists from […]

Tim Allen faces Gearty Grilling on fieldwork in Africa

Tim Allen, the Head of Department and Professor of Development Anthropology, becomes the latest subject of the ‘Gearty Grillings’, a series of weekly video debates from LSE’s Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) in which Conor Gearty (Director of the IPA and Professor of Human Rights Law) subjects academics to a five-minute grilling about their research. See Professor Allen discuss his controversial […]