Mar 8 2018

International Women’s Day: Celebrating the most influential women in the field of IR

This International Women’s Day, the Department of International Relations would like to take the opportunity to celebrate some (but by no means all) of the most inspirational and influential women in the field of IR:

Seyla Benhabib

Seyla Benhabib

Seyla Benhabib is the Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Yale University.

Professor Benhabib was the President of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in 2006-07, a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 2009, at the NYU Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law and Justice in Spring 2012, and at the German Marshall Fund’s Transatlantic Academy in Washington DC in Spring 2013.

In 2009, she received the Ernst Bloch prize for her contributions to cultural dialogue in a global civilisation and in May 2012, the Leopold Lucas Prize of the Evangelical Academy of Tubingen. She was also awarded the Meister Eckhart Prize of the Identity Foundation and the University of Cologne in May 2014 for her contributions of contemporary thought.

 

Erica Chenoweth

Erica Chenoweth

Erica Chenoweth is Professor and Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. An internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, Foreign Policy magazine ranked her among the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2013 for her efforts to promote the empirical study of civil resistance.

In 2014, Chenoweth received the Karl Deutsch Award for her impact on the field of international politics or peace research. Together with Maria J. Stephan, she also won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, in recognition of their outstanding proposal for creating a more just and peaceful world order. Their book, Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict (Columbia University Press, 2011), also won the 2012 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award.

Chenoweth also co-directs the Inclusive Global Leadership Initiative, and co-founded the Crowd Counting Consortium.

 

Rey Chow

Rey Chow

Rey Chow is a cultural critic, specialising in 20th-century Chinese fiction and film and postcolonial theory. She is currently Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University.

Chow’s writing challenges assumptions in many different scholarly conversations including those about literature, film, visual media, sexuality and gender, postcolonialism, ethnicity, and cross-cultural politics. She explores the problematic assumptions about non-Western cultures and ethnic minorities within the context of academic discourse as well as in more public discourses about ethnic and cultural identity. Many of her explorations of critical concepts have been recognised by scholars as important, including her ideas about visualism, the ethnic subject and cultural translation.

 

Cynthia Enloe

Cynthia Enloe

Cynthia Enloe is a feminist writer, theorist, and professor. She is best known for her work on gender and militarism, and for her contributions to the field of feminist international relations.

In 2015, the International Feminist Journal of Politics, in conjunction with the academic publisher Taylor & Francis, created the Cynthia Enloe Award “in honour of Cynthia Enloe’s pioneering feminist research into international politics and political economy, and her considerable contribution to building a more inclusive feminist scholarly community.”

 

Margot Light

Margot Light

Margot Light is Professor Emeritus of International Relations in the Department of International Relations at LSE. She is an expert on post-Soviet politics, and is a regular commentator and featured expert on both radio and television. Her research interests include east-west relations; Soviet, CIS and Russian defence, foreign and domestic policy; and eastern European foreign relations.

She co-edits the Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics, and her publications include Putin’s Russia and the Enlarged Europe (with R. Allison and S. White) (Blackwell: 2006); as well as many journal and book chapters, including ‘Enlargement and the new outsiders‘ (with S. White and I. McAllister), Journal of Common Market Studies 40.1 (2002): 135-53; and ‘The export of democracy‘, in K. E. Smith and M. Light (eds.), Ethics and Foreign Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2001), pp. 75-91.

 

L.H.M. Ling

L.H.M. Ling

L.H.M. Ling is Professor of International Affairs at The New School. She has authored four books: Postcolonial International Relations: Conquest and Desire between Asia and the West (2002), Transforming World Politics: From Empire to Multiple Worlds (co-authored with A.M. Agathangelou, York University, 2009); The Dao of World Politics: Towards a Post-Westphalian, Worldist International Relations (2014); and Imagining World Politics: Sihar & Shenya, A Fable for Our Times (2014).

Professor Ling has four anthologies: Theorizing International Politics from the Global South: Worlds of Difference (co-edited with Nizar Messari and Arlene B. Tickner, Routledge, forthcoming); Asia in International Relations: Unlearning Imperial Power Relations (co-edited with Pinar Bilgin, Routledge, 2017); India and China: Rethinking Borders and Security (University of Michigan Press, 2016); and Four Seas to One Family: Overseas Chinese and the Chinese Dream (co-edited with Tan Chung, bilingual edition, 2015).

Professor Ling’s articles have appeared in International Studies Quarterly, Review in International Studies, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, International Feminist Journal of Politics, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, positions: east asia cultures critiques, among others.

 

Chandra Mohanty

Chandra Mohanty

Chandra Mohanty is a Distinguished Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Sociology, and the Cultural Foundations of Education and Dean’s Professor of the Humanities at Syracuse University.

Mohanty, a postcolonial and transnational feminist theorist, has argued for the inclusion of a transnational approach in exploring women’s experiences across the world. She is author of Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity (Duke University Press, 2003 and Zubaan Books, India, 2004; translated into Korean, 2005, Swedish, 2007, and Turkish, 2009, Japanese, 2012 and Italian, 2012), and co-editor of Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism (Indiana University Press, 1991), Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures (Routledge, 1997), Feminism and War: Confronting U.S. Imperialism, (Zed Press, 2008), and The Sage Handbook on Identities (coedited with Margaret Wetherell, 2010).

Her work focuses on transnational feminist theory, anti-capitalist feminist praxis, anti-racist education, and the politics of knowledge. Central to Mohanty’s transnational mission is the project of building a “non-colonizing feminist solidarity across the borders,” through an intersectional analysis of race, nation, colonialism, sexuality, class and gender.

 

V Spike Peterson

V Spike Peterson

V Spike Peterson is a Professor of International Relations in the School of Government and Public Policy, with courtesy appointments in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute for LGBT Studies, Centre for Latin American Studies, and International Studies.

In 2018, she received the 2018 LGBTQA Scholar Award by the LGBTQA Caucus of the International Studies Association, for her long-standing and pioneering research in queer approaches to IR and IPE. In 2016 she received the Charles A. McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Political Science Association.

Peterson’s book publications include Global Gender Issues in the New Millennium (2010) and two earlier editions of Global Gender Issues (1999, 1993) with Anne Sisson Runyan; her own A Critical Rewriting of Global Political Economy: Integrating Reproductive, Productive and Virtual Economies (2003); and Gendered States: Feminist (Re)Visions of International Relations Theory (1992), which she contributed to and edited.

She has published more than 100 journal articles and book chapters, most recently on informalisations of work in relation to structural inequalities and their corollary insecurities worldwide; global householding; gendering war and its economies; and critical queering of marriage, citizenship, migration and states/nations.

 

Kathryn Sikkink

Kathryn Sikkink

Kathryn Sikkink is the Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She works on international norms and institutions, transnational advocacy networks, the impact of human rights law and policies, and transitional justice.

Her publications include The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions are Changing World Politics; Mixed Signals: U.S. Human Rights Policy and Latin America; Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics (co-authored with Margaret Keck and awarded the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas for Improving World Order, and the ISA Chadwick Alger Award for Best Book in the area of International Organizations); and The Persistent Power of Human Rights: From Commitment to Compliance, (co-edited with Thomas Risse and Stephen Ropp).

She holds an MA and PhD from Columbia University, and has been a Fulbright Scholar in Argentina and a Guggenheim fellow. She is a fellow of the American Philosophical Society, the American Association for Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the editorial board of the International Studies Quarterly, International Organization, and the American Political Science Review.

 

Susan Strange

Susan Strange

Susan Strange was a British scholar of International Relations who was “almost single-handedly responsible for creating international political economy”. Notable publications include Casino Capitalism (1986), States and Markets (1988), The Retreat of the State (1996), and Mad Money (1998).

Read our full tribute to Professor Susan Strange.

 

 

 

 

 

J Ann Tickner

J Ann Tickner

J Ann Tickner is a feminist international relations theorist. She is a distinguished scholar in residence at the School of International Services in the American University, Washington DC, which she recently joined after fifteen years as a Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California.

Tickner served as President of the International Studies Association (ISA) from 2006-2007; whilst she was not the first female president of the ISA, she was the first feminist IR theorist to head the ISA. Her books include Gendering World Politics: Issues and Approaches in the Post-Cold War Era (Columbia University Press, 2001), Gender in International Relations: Feminist Perspectives on Achieving International Security (Columbia University Press, 1992), and Self-Reliance Versus Power Politics: American and Indian Experiences in Building Nation-States (Columbia University Press, 1987). One of Tickner’s most famous journal articles was “You Just Don’t Understand” (International Studies Quarterly (1997) 41, 611-632), which critiqued mainstream international relations theorists for the omission of gender from their theory and practice.

 

Cynthia Weber

Cynthia Weber

Cynthia Weber is a Professor of International Relations at Sussex University, and Co-Director of the media company, Pato Productions.

She has published several internationally recognised books on topics ranging from US foreign policy and international relations to theory and film, including Simulating Sovereignty (Cambridge University Press, 1995), Imagining America at War (Routledge, 2006) and I am an American: Filming the Fear of Difference (Intellect Books, 2011). Her article ‘Reconsidering Statehood: Examining the Sovereignty/Intervention Boundary’ won the British International Studies Prize for the best article published in the journal Review of International Studies in its year. Weber regularly contributes to BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour.

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