The 10th annual GPPN Conference, hosted by the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs, featured students’ solution oriented ideas and prototypes to address public policy challenges identified by the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). To participate, each GPPN member school carefully selected up to five student teams to present their projects and compete for the GPPN prize. The result: 32 teams from around the world met in Paris to showcase their ideas on how to solve some of the most pressing global challenges of today. 

In the video below, a team from the LSE MPA pitch their ideas behind the chatbot SuperGov.

SuperGov is a chatbot, which will be available on popular messaging platforms like Messenger and WhatsApp. Acting as a digital personal assistant, SuperGov will be available to respond to citizens 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Users will be free to ask any question relating to one’s rights, essential public services, information about administrative requirements, and any other query that a national administration may today be expected to provide an answer to. By applying AI, SuperGov will understand questions from citizens and mine public data sets, as well as the Internet, to fetch most appropriate responses based on user’s characteristics. Like any other bot, SuperGov will require training during the initial use of the system but as the platform scales and more citizens choose to use it, the system will learn the most adequate responses and personalize them in regards specific user expectations. In cases where data sets offer no satisfying answer, SuperGov will seek to connect the user to an administrative or private representative to continue the discussion and answer the query.


Meet the team

Siddharth Rajgopalan: I am enrolled in the Master of Public Administration (MPA) programme at the London School of Economics). Previously, I played a key role in growing customer lifetime value at TradeGecko, a cloud-based inventory management start-up in Singapore. Prior to that, I was involved in fundraising and creating strategic partnerships for Ground-Up Initiative, a non-profit organisation in Singapore that is piloting initiatives in sustainable development. With a first degree in engineering and a keen eye for innovation, I am mainly interested in exploring the emergent ideas that come out at the intersection of policy, technology, and sustainability.

Théo Bourgery was born and raised in Paris before moving to London in his teen years. He has earned a degree in Sociology and Economics from McGill University (Canada). He then went on to work as a political aide for a French MP at the National Assembly, before starting an MPA at the London School of Economics.

Hélène Procoudine-Gorsky: I just turned twenty-three and I come from France. Before joining the London School of Economics as a first-year student in Master of Public Administration, I studied Economics & Finance in Paris. While I was working in financial markets and investment banking, my interest for macroeconomics brought me to look into how public policy decisions affect the international economy as a whole. The world’s policy-makers face many challenges today, and I would like to contribute to finding the solutions needed to tackle them.


This blog post was originally posted on the GPPN blog.