Democracy, governance, and citizenship

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

The two contenders in Costa Rica’s presidential runoff on 1 April 2018, Fabricio Alvarado (PRN) and Carlos Alvarado (PAC), are diametric opposites on the issues that have dominated recent elections, and their supporters are also divided along geographic and socioeconomic lines. Thankfully, a healthy democratic context militates against the worst effects of polarisation, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of […]

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

In a context of political dealignment and a fluid multiparty system, corruption scandals and a divisive international court ruling on sexual and reproductive rights have drastically altered the electoral landscape, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of Central Florida).

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    Chile’s 2017 presidential election: the alliances and aspirations of Piñera and Guillier

Chile’s 2017 presidential election: the alliances and aspirations of Piñera and Guillier

The first round of Chile’s presidential elections has created the most unpredictable political constellation since the nation’s return to democracy in 1989. The cabals and intrigues materialising the run-up to the second round on December 17 could have long-term effects on the nation’s political culture, ideological identities and socio-economic development, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Artool, Chile) in the third […]

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    Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Though Bolsonaro has little relevant experience, a poor record as a legislator, and few economic, fiscal, or foreign-policy proposals, his ability to capitalise on widespread hostility to Brazilian politics and politicians has made him the second most popular candidate for the 2018 presidential election, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Washington University).

Chile’s 2017 presidential election: who will win and why?

Disillusionment with the second centre-left government of Michelle Bachelet will likely see the return of the conservative right, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Artool, Chile) in the second of a three-part series on Chile’s 2017 presidential election.

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    Chile’s 2017 presidential election: evaluating the second Bachelet government

Chile’s 2017 presidential election: evaluating the second Bachelet government

As the nation heads to the polls, the balance sheet of Michelle Bachelet’s second government is negative, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Artool, Chile) in the first of a three-part series on Chile’s 2017 presidential election.

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    Chile’s ‘second transition’: the persistent politics of memory in the 2017 presidential election

Chile’s ‘second transition’: the persistent politics of memory in the 2017 presidential election

The “second transition” debate reveals that conflicted memories remain at the core of political legitimacy, transforming the 2017 elections into a stage where competing versions of truth, justice, and culture revive questions of the past that demand resolution in the present, writes Roberto Velázquez Quiroz (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile).

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    Caribbean ‘Citizenship by Investment’ is becoming a dangerous race to the bottom

Caribbean ‘Citizenship by Investment’ is becoming a dangerous race to the bottom

Although Citizenship by Investment schemes showed early promise as a spur to national development, increasing competition in the region and beyond is creating a dangerous zero-sum game in which states try to offset declining income by further reducing pricing, writes David Jessop (Caribbean Council).

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    De los sindicatos a los movimientos sociales, las dinámicas políticas en Sudamérica han seguido un patrón de olas de incorporación

De los sindicatos a los movimientos sociales, las dinámicas políticas en Sudamérica han seguido un patrón de olas de incorporación

La idea de un “giro a la izquierda” dice poco sobre el ascenso y caída de los partidos de izquierda hoy o en cualquier otro momento de la historia de América Latina. Aunque los actores y las arenas varían con el tiempo, la clave está en comprender las sucesivas oleadas de demandas de los segmentos más pobres de la sociedad, […]

From Chávez to Trump, must we really talk about populism?

There has been a surge in academic and media interest in populism, fuelled mainly by the election of Donald Trump. But as misleading comparisons with Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez show, the concept obscures more than it illuminates, while also marginalising any challenge to a dysfunctional “moderate centre”, writes Barry Cannon (Maynooth University).