Democracy, governance, and citizenship

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    From the Castros to Cuba’s new president Miguel Díaz-Canel: continuity or change?

From the Castros to Cuba’s new president Miguel Díaz-Canel: continuity or change?

Miguel Díaz-Canel’s presidency is likely to represent a continuation of the “negotiative process” that has allowed government and society alike to adapt to evolving challenges ever since 1959, write Emily J. Kirk (Dalhousie University) and Isabel Story (University of Nottingham).

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    Fifty years after the controversial May ’67 trial, France continues to criminalise activists in Guadeloupe

Fifty years after the controversial May ’67 trial, France continues to criminalise activists in Guadeloupe

Recent attempts to criminalise trade unionists involved in the 2009 French Caribbean general strike recall the trial of independence activists following the May ’67 Pointe-à-Pitre massacre in Guadeloupe, writes Grace Carrington (LSE Department of International History).

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    The six sources of Piñera’s success in Chile’s 2017 elections will also shape his second term

The six sources of Piñera’s success in Chile’s 2017 elections will also shape his second term

Piñera’s campaign won out thanks to fears of “Chilezuela”, the non-committal stance of Frente Amplio supporters, the divided Christian Democrats, Obama-style campaigning, a”low-energy” opponent, and a little help from friends in the media, all of which will influence the new president’s second term in office, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw), Miguel Zlosilo (Artool, Chile), and Corinna Saeger (EURAC Research).

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    The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

If Venezuela’s opposition really wants to remove Nicolas Maduro, it must unite behind renegade candidate Henri Falcon, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

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    Colombia elections 2018: the perils of polarisation for a precarious peace

Colombia elections 2018: the perils of polarisation for a precarious peace

As Colombia enters its most important electoral cycle in recent history, right-wing proposals for renewed militarisation are gaining ground on support for the peace process, while the left remains highly divided. In these extreme conditions, there exists a real danger that the peace process could be reversed, writes Tobias Franz (Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá).

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    El Salvador elections 2018: security, migration, and the beginning of the end for two-party rule

El Salvador elections 2018: security, migration, and the beginning of the end for two-party rule

El Salvador’s legislative and municipal elections on Sunday, 4 March, 2018, kick off an election cycle that will stretch through to next year’s presidential ballot. A desperate security situation, threats to Salvadoran migrants in the US, and a growing generation gap in traditional parties could mean a bumpy ride for the country’s politics, writes Adrian Bergmann (Central American University).

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: the two Alvarados, between deepening division and democratic dependability

The two contenders in Costa Rica’s presidential runoff on 1 April 2018, Fabricio Alvarado (PRN) and Carlos Alvarado (PAC), are diametric opposites on the issues that have dominated recent elections, and their supporters are also divided along geographic and socioeconomic lines. Thankfully, a healthy democratic context militates against the worst effects of polarisation, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of […]

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    Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

Costa Rica’s 2018 elections: corruption, morality politics, and voter alienation make uncertainty the only certainty

In a context of political dealignment and a fluid multiparty system, corruption scandals and a divisive international court ruling on sexual and reproductive rights have drastically altered the electoral landscape, write Evelyn Villarreal Fernández (State of the Nation Programme) and Bruce M. Wilson (University of Central Florida).

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    Chile’s 2017 presidential election: the alliances and aspirations of Piñera and Guillier

Chile’s 2017 presidential election: the alliances and aspirations of Piñera and Guillier

The first round of Chile’s presidential elections has created the most unpredictable political constellation since the nation’s return to democracy in 1989. The cabals and intrigues materialising the run-up to the second round on December 17 could have long-term effects on the nation’s political culture, ideological identities and socio-economic development, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Artool, Chile) in the third […]

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    Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Though Bolsonaro has little relevant experience, a poor record as a legislator, and few economic, fiscal, or foreign-policy proposals, his ability to capitalise on widespread hostility to Brazilian politics and politicians has made him the second most popular candidate for the 2018 presidential election, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Washington University).