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Chile’s 2017 presidential election: who will win and why?

Disillusionment with the second centre-left government of Michelle Bachelet will likely see the return of the conservative right, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Opina, Chile) in the second of a two-part series on Chile’s 2017 presidential election.

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    Chile’s 2017 presidential election: evaluating the second Bachelet government

Chile’s 2017 presidential election: evaluating the second Bachelet government

As the nation heads to the polls, the balance sheet of Michelle Bachelet’s second government is negative, write Roland Benedikter (EURAC Research, COHA, University of Wroclaw) and Miguel Zlosilo (Opina, Chile) in the first of a two-part series on Chile’s 2017 presidential election.

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    Chile’s ‘second transition’: the persistent politics of memory in the 2017 presidential election

Chile’s ‘second transition’: the persistent politics of memory in the 2017 presidential election

The “second transition” debate reveals that conflicted memories remain at the core of political legitimacy, transforming the 2017 elections into a stage where competing versions of truth, justice, and culture revive questions of the past that demand resolution in the present, writes Roberto Velázquez Quiroz (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile).

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    Is it wise to decapitate organised armed groups? The case of Colombia’s Clan del Golfo

Is it wise to decapitate organised armed groups? The case of Colombia’s Clan del Golfo

Demobilisation of this armed group is an opportunity not to be missed. In a context of FARC disarmament and a peace process with the ELN, the state can establish its presence throughout the country and smooth the road to peace, write Juan David Gélvez and Michael Weintraub (Universidad de los Andes).

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    Who’s invading whom? The complex battle for Rio de Janeiro’s informal settlements on federal land

Who’s invading whom? The complex battle for Rio de Janeiro’s informal settlements on federal land

Depicting favela residents as environmentally destructive invaders serves to justify evictions and undermine community heritage in the name of creating a “modern” city free of potent signs of poverty and inequality, writes Jennifer Chisholm (University of Cambridge).

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    The future of Caribbean sugar will depend on the region’s capacity for cooperation

The future of Caribbean sugar will depend on the region’s capacity for cooperation

As CARICOM trade ministers meet to discuss the future of Caribbean sugar, David Jessop (Caribbean Council) argues that successful protection of the industry will require that the four exporting countries, their fractious sugar industries, and food and drink manufacturers jointly recognise the long-term benefits that could flow from integration.

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    China’s new relations with Panama and Costa Rica are another step towards a Beijing Consensus in Central America

China’s new relations with Panama and Costa Rica are another step towards a Beijing Consensus in Central America

Increased trade, aid, investment, and diplomatic engagement between China and both Costa Rica and Panama signal a more general projection of Chinese economic and political standards in international trade policy, writes Sophie Wintgens (Université Libre de Bruxelles).

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    Levantando el velo de la bondad: “la amistad” y el colonialismo de asentamiento en la Patagonia galesa de Argentina

Levantando el velo de la bondad: “la amistad” y el colonialismo de asentamiento en la Patagonia galesa de Argentina

El impulso pacífico de los galeses en un contexto global de brutalidad colonial sobresale como un modelo de generosidad. Pero esta “amistad” sirvió finalmente para reforzar el proyecto colonizador en Argentina y más allá, escribe Lucy Taylor (Aberystwyth University).

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    The Cayman conundrum: why is one tiny archipelago the largest financial centre in Latin America and the Caribbean?

The Cayman conundrum: why is one tiny archipelago the largest financial centre in Latin America and the Caribbean?

Analysing how millions of multinational corporations structure their global ownership chains reveals that Cayman acts as a ‘sink’ offshore financial centre where foreign capital accumulates and data trails often end, writes Jan Fichtner (University of Amsterdam).

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    Building back better in the Caribbean requires supportive international finance

Building back better in the Caribbean requires supportive international finance

The time has come for the international community to shape a financial architecture that is more supportive of small island states’ special circumstances and needs, writes Gail Hurley (United Nations Development Programme).