LAC and the World

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    What can the political economy of Latin America’s regions tell us about development in the very long term?

What can the political economy of Latin America’s regions tell us about development in the very long term?

The first LSE-Stanford Conference on Long Range Development in Latin America, a new annual series of high-level conferences co-hosted by LSE, Stanford, and the Universidad de los Andes (Colombia), will take place at Stanford on 11-12 May, 2017, with the participation of numerous LSE researchers and the support of the LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre. Here co-organiser Jean-Paul Faguet reveals that political economy research […]

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    The end of colonialism in Puerto Rico? Evaluating the options in the 2017 political status referendum

The end of colonialism in Puerto Rico? Evaluating the options in the 2017 political status referendum

The options for decolonising Puerto Rico have always been complex and contested. But the US decision to force a “status quo” option on to the latest ballot has undermined this chance to settle the issue once and for all, writes Gibrán Cruz Martínez.

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    Cobardía en el Brexit y coraje en Colombia: la historia de dos referendos

Cobardía en el Brexit y coraje en Colombia: la historia de dos referendos

Los plebiscitos reducen temas complejos a preguntas sencillas de sí o no y se prestan a pasiones momentáneas que pueden ser fácilmente manipuladas, escribe Jean-Paul Faguet.

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    US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

Even with Venezuela’s substantial support in doubt, the nature of Nicaraguan trade, migration, and aid links with the US makes the country less vulnerable to pressure than many expect. Instead, diplomacy and civil society will bear the brunt of unintended consequences, writes Pamela Neumann.

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    Brazilian foreign policy in the Trump era: a chance as much as a challenge

Brazilian foreign policy in the Trump era: a chance as much as a challenge

Trump may represent a challenge to Brazil and multilateralism, but his government also offers unique opportunities for Brazilian foreign policymakers to advance economic integration and expand the nation’s leadership in the international community, writes Mark S. Langevin.

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    Brexit cowardice and Colombian courage: a tale of two referenda

Brexit cowardice and Colombian courage: a tale of two referenda

The divergent reactions of Britain’s Theresa May and Colombia’s Juan Manuel Santos to crucial yet dysfunctional referenda reveal a great deal about the nature of democracy and leadership today, writes Jean-Paul Faguet.

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    Lessons of Bolivia’s First Globalisation (1850s-1913) can help Latin America react to rising protectionism

Lessons of Bolivia’s First Globalisation (1850s-1913) can help Latin America react to rising protectionism

This is not the first time Latin American economies have been threatened by a surge in protectionism. But before responding in kind, they need to consider Bolivia’s experience of the First Globalisation in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, writes José Alejandro Peres-Cajías.

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    Early British railways in Argentina were not “British” alone

Early British railways in Argentina were not “British” alone

The “British” railways driving Argentina’s national integration in the late nineteenth century were actually joint ventures with significant local involvement. But the era of spectacular growth ultimately ended when profit guarantees undermined creditworthiness, writes Colin M. Lewis.

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    Cuba is poor, but who is to blame – Castro or 50 years of the US blockade?

Cuba is poor, but who is to blame – Castro or 50 years of the US blockade?

Fidel Castro has often been blamed for the state of the Cuban economy, but the longstanding US embargo and the question of what constitutes real economic success make the issue far more complex than that, argues Helen Yaffe.

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    Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Construction of a US-Mexico border wall was a cornerstone of Donald Trump’s election campaign. But with Mexico refusing to pay for it, his government has proposed to recoup the cost through a 20 per cent tax on Mexican imports. The reality is that this tax would be paid by US importers, raising costs for US consumers and businesses, writes Stuart Brown.