Political economy, development, and business

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    Odebrecht in the Amazon: comparing responses to corruption in Latin America

Odebrecht in the Amazon: comparing responses to corruption in Latin America

The Odebrecht scandal reveals not only the extent of corruption in public contracts and elections in Latin America, but also the widely varying capacity and inclination of different political systems to respond, writes Kathryn Hochstetler.

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    Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

The cost to Latin America of being the world’s most violent region is not only a human one. New research by Laura Jaitman reveals that its enormous economic costs are equal to annual spending on infrastructure, or enough to halve the region’s housing deficit.

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    What can the political economy of Latin America’s regions tell us about development in the very long term?

What can the political economy of Latin America’s regions tell us about development in the very long term?

The first LSE-Stanford Conference on Long Range Development in Latin America, a new annual series of high-level conferences co-hosted by LSE, Stanford, and the Universidad de los Andes (Colombia), will take place at Stanford on 11-12 May, 2017, with the participation of numerous LSE researchers and the support of the LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre. Here co-organiser Jean-Paul Faguet reveals that political economy research […]

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    Latin America’s productivity problems can only be overcome by incentivising, underwriting, and enforcing technological investment

Latin America’s productivity problems can only be overcome by incentivising, underwriting, and enforcing technological investment

With the right kinds of state support, Latin American firms can develop and compete in productive segments higher up the global value chain, writes Tobias Franz.

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    Lessons of Bolivia’s First Globalisation (1850s-1913) can help Latin America react to rising protectionism

Lessons of Bolivia’s First Globalisation (1850s-1913) can help Latin America react to rising protectionism

This is not the first time Latin American economies have been threatened by a surge in protectionism. But before responding in kind, they need to consider Bolivia’s experience of the First Globalisation in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, writes José Alejandro Peres-Cajías.

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    Early British railways in Argentina were not “British” alone

Early British railways in Argentina were not “British” alone

The “British” railways driving Argentina’s national integration in the late nineteenth century were actually joint ventures with significant local involvement. But the era of spectacular growth ultimately ended when profit guarantees undermined creditworthiness, writes Colin M. Lewis.

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    Cuba is poor, but who is to blame – Castro or 50 years of the US blockade?

Cuba is poor, but who is to blame – Castro or 50 years of the US blockade?

Fidel Castro has often been blamed for the state of the Cuban economy, but the longstanding US embargo and the question of what constitutes real economic success make the issue far more complex than that, argues Helen Yaffe.

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    Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Construction of a US-Mexico border wall was a cornerstone of Donald Trump’s election campaign. But with Mexico refusing to pay for it, his government has proposed to recoup the cost through a 20 per cent tax on Mexican imports. The reality is that this tax would be paid by US importers, raising costs for US consumers and businesses, writes Stuart Brown.

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    The case of INDEC in Argentina shows that statistical neutrality is an unachievable ideal

The case of INDEC in Argentina shows that statistical neutrality is an unachievable ideal

In Argentina as elsewhere, national statistics have recently become as issue of public debate. 

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    Cuba’s strong tradition of medical internationalism looks set to continue despite upheaval in the Americas

Cuba’s strong tradition of medical internationalism looks set to continue despite upheaval in the Americas

After Castro’s death and with profound political and economic change across the Americas, Gail Hurley asks, what future for Cuba’s medical internationalism?