Mexico

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    Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Femicide in Ciudad Juárez is enabled by the regulation of gender, justice, and production in Mexico

Ciudad Juárez operates as a necropolis where femicide legislation coexists with reductionist and patriarchal approaches to gender violence. The victims of killings and disappearances are presented as prostitutes, and those who investigate are seen to be staining the city’s good name. Mexico’s lax justice system and the free-trade zones of the maquiladora industry provide the enabling context, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies in Latin America are mostly words and little accountability, just like in Europe

Digital inequalities policies must tailor their interventions to the problems, needs, and outcomes of specific vulnerable groups if they are to move beyond good intentions and achieve real socioeconomic change, writes Ellen Helsper (LSE Department of Media and Communications).

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    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.

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    Into the darkness: how illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

Into the darkness: how illegal surveillance is undermining open government reforms in Latin America

The increasing scale of illegal surveillance in Latin America – enabled by state procurement of surveillance and hacking software – is raising urgent questions about its impact on civil rights. Fabrizio Scrollini, LSE graduate and chair of DATYSOC (Data and Society), considers how democracies can keep their citizens safe in an age of aggressive surveillance technology.

  • Permalink Controversial events such as the Tlatelolco protests and subsequent massacre in 1968 Marcellí Perelló, public domainGallery

    Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

By placing archives under direct control of the executive and creating retroactive rules to define the historical, Mexico’s proposed General Law on Archives could damage academic, journalistic, and popular access to collective memory, writes Alejandro de Coss Corzo.

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    Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Transitioning to low-carbon economies is a vital goal for developing countries, yet significant teething problems remain in the field of climate finance. The case of NAFIN and Mexican wind energy reveals how national development banks are ideally placed to help stimulate this crucial investment, writes Emilio Garmendia Pérez Montero.

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    The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The history of the left in Mexico shows that embracing nationalism can lead to the lack of a distinct programme and the misreading of opponents as potential allies, writes William A. Booth.

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    Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

The romantic idea of death as the quintessence of Mexicanness masks real suffering in a country where senseless death has become commonplace, writes Myriam Lamrani.

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    Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Funding Trump’s Mexico border wall though an import tax would only hurt ordinary Americans

Construction of a US-Mexico border wall was a cornerstone of Donald Trump’s election campaign. But with Mexico refusing to pay for it, his government has proposed to recoup the cost through a 20 per cent tax on Mexican imports. The reality is that this tax would be paid by US importers, raising costs for US consumers and businesses, writes Stuart Brown.

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    The population centres that Columbus found in 1492 persist as major cities in the Americas

The population centres that Columbus found in 1492 persist as major cities in the Americas

It may not be possible to change centuries-old spatial distributions of economic activity, argue William F. Maloney and Felipe Valencia Caicedo.