Venezuela

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    Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Brazil elections 2018: how will Bolsonaro’s victory affect migration policy in Brazil and South America?

Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in Brazil’s 2018 presidential election could lead to a more severe migration policy, attacks on migrants’ rights, and fragmentation of regional approaches to mobility, write Marcia Vera Espinoza (Queen Mary University of London) and Leiza Brumat (European University Institute).

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    Understanding patterns of protest against Cuba’s medical internationalism

Understanding patterns of protest against Cuba’s medical internationalism

The presence of Cuban healthcare professionals in countries like Brazil, Bolivia, and Haiti has followed a clear path from protest to acceptance, but the case Venezuela shows the vital importance of political neutrality, write Emily J. Kirk (Dalhousie University), Chris Walker (St Mary’s University), and Arturo Méndez (University of Camagüey).

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    The Venezuelan exodus: placing Latin America in the global conversation on migration management

The Venezuelan exodus: placing Latin America in the global conversation on migration management

Though Venezuelan emigration has passed through phases like those of the European migration crisis, issues of foreign policy have seen Latin America respond quite differently to large-scale migration, write Nicolas Parent and Luisa Feline Freier (Universidad del Pacífico, Peru).

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    Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Is socialism to blame for Venezuela’s never-ending crisis?

Though ’21st-century socialism’ is implicated in Venezuela’s collapse, so too are many characteristics of the country’s context, capitalism, and culture, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

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    Venezuela elections 2018: evaluating electoral conditions in an authoritarian regime

Venezuela elections 2018: evaluating electoral conditions in an authoritarian regime

Participating in elections under authoritarian regimes can reap rewards, but electoral conditions in Venezuela have degenerated so drastically that a Maduro victory in 2018 could not be considered democratic, write Griselda Colina (Observatorio Global de Comunicación y Democracia) and Jennifer McCoy (Georgia State University).

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    Venezuela elections 2018: military and institutional backing could keep Maduro in power despite sanctions

Venezuela elections 2018: military and institutional backing could keep Maduro in power despite sanctions

Further economic deterioration and more drastic international sanctions resulting from a Maduro ‘win’ will only reinforce his linchpin of high-level military support, writes Diego Moya Ocampos (IHS Markit).

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    US trade sanctions are also hurting Jamaica, Guyana, and the wider Caribbean

US trade sanctions are also hurting Jamaica, Guyana, and the wider Caribbean

The Trump administration’s “America First” policy and sanctions on Russia and Venezuela have significant unintended consequences in the Caribbean, especially for the bauxite industries of Jamaica and Guyana, writes David Jessop (Caribbean Council).

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    The implications of a divisive Summit of the Americas in Lima

The implications of a divisive Summit of the Americas in Lima

The 8th Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru, will be divisive, potentially leaving Latin America and the Caribbean in leaderless disarray just when changing international relationships require unity and a common identity, writes David Jessop (Caribbean Council).

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    The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

If Venezuela’s opposition really wants to remove Nicolas Maduro, it must unite behind renegade candidate Henri Falcon, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

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    US encouragement of a military coup in Venezuela is dangerous for both countries

US encouragement of a military coup in Venezuela is dangerous for both countries

Publicly condoning military action and using economic sanctions to provoke it will only exacerbate Venezuelan suffering and further damage the tattered reputation of the US on democracy and human-rights issues in the Western Hemisphere, writes Timothy M. Gill (University of North Carolina, Wilmington).