Apr 30 2013

Chile and Spain: Facing the Future

LSE Enterprise’s conference in Santiago this month, supported by the Spanish Embassy and the Spanish Chamber of Commerce in Chile, featured two LSE academics discussing energy and infrastructure in the Chilean context.

From left to right: Mr Adam Austerfield, LSE Enterprise Project Director for Spain and Latin America; Dr Luca Taschini; Mr Pedro Pablo Errazuriz, Chilean Minister for Transport and Telecommunications; His Excellency Inigo De Palacio, Spanish Ambassador to Chile; and Dr Andrés Rodríguez Pose

From left to right: Mr Adam Austerfield, LSE Enterprise Project Director for Spain and Latin America; Dr Luca Taschini; Mr Pedro Pablo Errázuriz, Chilean Minister for Transport and Telecommunications; His Excellency Inigo De Palacio, Spanish Ambassador to Chile; and Professor Andrés Rodríguez Pose

Dr Luca Taschini explored the major drivers of CO2 emissions, covering regional and sector-specific trends in his talk on Energy and Economics: the Challenge for Chile. He looked at the evolution of energy generation mixes in different Latin American countries. Indicators strongly suggest that the decarbonisation of the energy supply mix has historically been a major policy challenge. This indicates a need for regulator’s intervention. The aim of this intervention is to introduce policy regimes that set the right incentives for an industrial decarbonisation. This requires a wide range of public policies to address a range of market failures. Luca outlined the policy options that might reduce carbon emissions in Chile’s key sectors and discussed the adoption of an Emission Trading Scheme for Chile given its existing energy strengths and needs. See Luca’s interview in PULSO.

Infrastructure is always at the forefront of development strategies, with transport infrastructure being the most popular development policy in the EU. Professor Andrés Rodríguez Pose outlined the reasons for this and analysed the relationship between transport infrastructure, telecommunications and economic development. While a lack of basic infrastructure limits the potential for regional growth, concentrating on transport infrastructure can actually harm peripheral regions unless it forms part of an integrated development strategy focused equally on human capital and innovation and sensitive to spatial and temporal effects.

The conference was sponsored by Telefónica and Elecnor and held at Telefónica’s offices.

More on LSE Enterprise’s work in Latin America

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