Find out about academic life at LSE through the years.

  • Red flag over Houghton Street? The radical tradition at LSE – myth, reality, fact

Red flag over Houghton Street? The radical tradition at LSE – myth, reality, fact

  • January 16th, 2019

Why does LSE have reputation for radicalism, and when did this idea begin? Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS, explores the opposing evidence of the figures and events of LSE’s history. Looking at historical perceptions of LSE’s radical status, alongside the actions of staff and students, he shows the origins of the idea go back to LSE’s earliest days.

Listen to the podcast
Laski and Miliband
One […]

  • Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, LSE and the origins of International Relations

Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, LSE and the origins of International Relations

  • December 12th, 2018

Over the past few years there has been renewed scholarly interest in the early history of the discipline of International Relations (IR) and the seminal role played by such figures as E H Carr, Hans J Morgenthau and key liberal theorists who helped build the foundations upon which the subject of IR came to be  constructed in the twentieth century. Professor […]

  • Hilde Himmelweit – pioneer of social psychology

Hilde Himmelweit – pioneer of social psychology

  • November 28th, 2018

In the mid 1960s Social Psychology emerged from Sociology as an independent department – the precursor of today’s Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, looks at the career of Hilde Himmelweit who led the discipline through its formative years at LSE.

Hildegarde Therese Litthauer was born in Berlin on 20 February 1918. Her father, Dr Siegfried […]

  • Lilian Knowles (1870-1926) – the pioneer

Lilian Knowles (1870-1926) – the pioneer

  • October 24th, 2018

Jennie Stayner introduces pioneering female academic Lilian Knowles, first female professor of Economic History at LSE, and first female Dean of Faculty in the University of London.
Intentionally or unintentionally, it seemed to be her lot to be breaking down barriers.
C M Knowles
Lilian Charlotte Anne Knowles (Tomn) was born in 1870 in Cornwall and spent a happy childhood riding horses and winning […]

  • Lucy Philip Mair – leading writer on colonial administration, early international relations scholar, and anthropologist

Lucy Philip Mair – leading writer on colonial administration, early international relations scholar, and anthropologist

  • October 3rd, 2018

Lucy Philip Mair was a well-known anthropologist at LSE; she is far less known for her significant contributions to the history of the discipline of International Relations. Professor Patricia Owens, director of a new Leverhulme project on the history of women’s international thought, highlights this neglected, early aspect of Lucy Mair’s academic life.

Lucy Philip Mair was born on 28 […]

  • In the LSE Library archives – The founding of the Anti-Federalist League

In the LSE Library archives – The founding of the Anti-Federalist League

The early days of UKIP have its roots at LSE. Curator for Politics and International Relations Daniel Payne takes a look at the Library archives that document the development of euroscepticism in the UK.

In November 1993 the Maastricht Treaty came into force. It was a highly controversial treaty, not just for the UK, which nearly bought down John Major’s Conservative […]

  • Susan Strange – world renowned international relations scholar

Susan Strange – world renowned international relations scholar

  • September 19th, 2018

Susan Strange held the Montague Burton Chair in International Relations 1978-88 and was a world renowned leader of the field, writes Professor Patricia Owens of the University of Sussex. Susan Strange had studied at LSE and become a journalist before returning to academia. As a professor at LSE, she published her most influential books and founded the British International Studies Association. Later, she became […]

  • “Exceptional and outstanding qualities” – Professor Ragnhild Hatton (1913-1995)

“Exceptional and outstanding qualities” – Professor Ragnhild Hatton (1913-1995)

  • September 12th, 2018

For 32 years Ragnhild Hatton was a member of the International History Department. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, investigates her career as a historian and teacher of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Ragnhild Hatton was born in Bergen, Norway in 1913. Her family was well to do with links to Bergen’s shipping interests, but her father, Gustav Ingolf Hanssen was an […]

  • “A pillar of the department” – Sally Sainsbury at LSE

“A pillar of the department” – Sally Sainsbury at LSE

  • September 5th, 2018

Sally Sainsbury completed the Diploma Social Policy and Administration at LSE in 1963, before joining the Department of Social Administration to become a research assistant and a teacher. She established herself a leader in the field of disability and social policy and retired as Emeritus Reader in Social Administration, Department of Social Policy. Here, Professor David Piachaud remembers a dedicated, unstinting […]

  • Theodore Gregory and early Economics at LSE

Theodore Gregory and early Economics at LSE

Sir Theodore Gregory (1890-1970) could be said to epitomise LSE. A student and member of staff from 1910 to 1937, he was international in outlook; interested in theory, practice and history; a gifted teacher; and valued by governments and institutions across the world, writes Robert Bigg. Gregory was, appropriately, one of the inaugural Honorary Fellows of the School in 1958.

Theodor […]

  • Father by son – Lionel Robbins by Richard Robbins

Father by son – Lionel Robbins by Richard Robbins

  • June 27th, 2018

As you walk towards the Library turnstiles in the Lionel Robbins Building the bronze head of Lionel Robbins surveys the scene. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about the portrait bust of Professor Lionel Robbins.

Lionel Robbins (1898-1984) first arrived at LSE in 1920 to study for the BSc (Econ). Initially he focused on the history of political ideas but also […]

  • Fred Halliday at LSE

Fred Halliday at LSE

  • June 13th, 2018

LSE Library holds the papers of the late Fred Halliday (1946-2010), former Professor of International Relations at LSE, writes Ben Martill. Fred Halliday had long ties to the School and a formidable reputation both in research and as a public intellectual.
About the Fred Halliday collection
The collection consists of over 350 files of personal effects, correspondence, memoirs, draft texts, travel-notes and work documents, […]

  • Professor Barna’s Social Survey of Stepney

Professor Barna’s Social Survey of Stepney

  • May 23rd, 2018

In 1946 Professor Tibor Barna led around 100 LSE student volunteers in a ‘Social Survey of Stepney’ and their findings are among his papers in LSE Library. The goal was to interview real Eastenders about their lives against the backdrop of postwar re-imagination of London’s East End. Inderbir Bhullar explores the archives.

This blog is about a story which, unfortunately, […]

  • The Guillebaud Report, the NHS and LSE

The Guillebaud Report, the NHS and LSE

  • May 2nd, 2018

As the NHS reaches its 70th anniversary, LSE Library’s Inderbir Bhullar explores the involvement of LSE’s Richard Titmuss and Brian Abel-Smith in the 1953 Guillebaud Report on the costs of the NHS.

On 5 July 2018 the NHS celebrates its 70th birthday. The anniversary will likely focus on how it came to be born as part of William Beveridge’s revolutionary plans for reformed social […]

  • A London Lecturer at Barnard – Eileen Power and the USA

A London Lecturer at Barnard – Eileen Power and the USA

  • April 25th, 2018

On Friday 16 March 2018 during the Singularity and Solidarity: Networks of Women at the LSE, 1895–1945  seminar, Rozemarijn van de Wal talked about her ongoing research into economic historian Eileen Power. After having found some new materials in American archives, she shared some of her initial findings in researching Eileen Power’s relationship with the United States of America.

Eileen […]

  • Dr Vera Anstey – “so absolutely sane, clear, quick, intelligent & safe”

Dr Vera Anstey – “so absolutely sane, clear, quick, intelligent & safe”

A pencil portrait of Vera Anstey hangs in the lobby of the Vera Anstey Suite in the Old Building. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about the portrait and a woman connected with LSE for 55 years.

Vera Anstey retired in 1964 and following her death in 1976 the Vera Anstey Suite in the Old Building was named in Vera’s honour […]

  • Women at LSE 1895-1932 – facts and figures

Women at LSE 1895-1932 – facts and figures

  • April 4th, 2018

As part of the Singularity and Solidarity: Networks of Women at the LSE, 1895–1945 seminar to mark Women’s History Month, LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, took a look at the first volume of the LSE Register, 1895-1932 to find out more about the women who taught and studied at LSE in its early years.
“The advantages of the School will be […]

  • Monitoring Global Poverty – Tony Atkinson and the World Bank

Monitoring Global Poverty – Tony Atkinson and the World Bank

  • March 16th, 2018

At the Beveridge 2.0 LSE Festival event Five LSE Giants’ Perspectives on Poverty, Professor Stephen Jenkins explained how the World Bank is changing its methodological approach as a result of the Monitoring Global Poverty report written by an “LSE Giant”, Professor Sir Anthony (Tony) B Atkinson (1944-2017), formerly Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics, 1980–1992, and Centennial Professor, […]

  • Graham Wallas – the supreme teacher of social philosophy

Graham Wallas – the supreme teacher of social philosophy

  • January 24th, 2018

The Graham Wallas Room on the fifth floor of the Old Building is named in honour of perhaps the least known of the quartet of LSE Founders – the political psychologist, Graham Wallas (1858-1932). LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about the man and his portrait recently installed in the Graham Wallas Room.

In August 1894 Graham Wallas was a house […]

  • Pioneers of the social sciences

Pioneers of the social sciences

  • December 27th, 2017

LSE is a world-leading pioneer of the social sciences. Subjects like international relations, social policy, sociology, social anthropology, social psychology and criminology all have their origins as subjects of university study in the innovative work carried out by LSE academics. Here are a selection of examples from LSE’s early years.
Accountancy
Academic accountancy in Britain was pioneered at LSE by a […]