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  • London School of Economics Coat of Arms. The beaver was adopted as the official mascot of the school in 1922, the same year the motto 'rerum cognoscere causas' was chosen – a line taken from Virgil’s Georgics meaning ‘to know the causes of things’.
    Permalink London School of Economics Coat of Arms. The beaver was adopted as the official mascot of the school in 1922, the same year the motto 'rerum cognoscere causas' was chosen – a line taken from Virgil’s Georgics meaning ‘to know the causes of things’. Credit: LSEGallery

    “Cheerful nonsense with brains behind it” – devising the LSE coat of arms

“Cheerful nonsense with brains behind it” – devising the LSE coat of arms

LSE’s coat of arms, motto “rerum cognoscere causas” and Beaver mascot were adopted in 1922 under Director William Beveridge and School Secretary Jessie Mair. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly shares the story of how they came about and who designed them. She names the winner of the School’s motto competition – and provides some of the unsuccessful entries.

Entering the Old Building from Houghton […]

Bronislaw Malinowski – LSE pioneer of social anthropology

2017 is the 90th anniversary of the establishment of a Chair in Social Anthropology at LSE. The Department of Anthropology’s Katharine Fletcher looks back at its first occupant, pioneering social anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski. Malinowski was born in Poland and spent much of the First World War conducting fieldwork in the Trobriand Islands, bringing the findings of his work to LSE in the 1920s.

Ninety years ago, […]

James Meade and the GATT

LSE professor James Meade was a Nobel Prize-winning economist whose work shaped twentieth century international trade policy. His archives are held by LSE Library and featured in the current exhibition A Wealth of Ideas: economics and LSE. Indy Bhullar, Curator of Economics and Social Policy at LSE Library, discusses Meade’s work along with that of LSE stalwarts Lionel Robbins and Hugh Dalton.

Trade agreements […]

Sporting prowess – The Ernest Cornwall Cup

The Ernest Cornwall Cup is a reminder of sporting prowess at LSE in the 1930s-1960s, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

Sport was a significant aspect of LSE life between the two world wars. William Beveridge, LSE Director from 1919-1937, was a keen badminton and tennis player and oversaw the purchase of the School’s sports ground at New Malden, with the […]

  • Permalink Square the Block by Richard WilsonGallery

    All is not as it seems – Square the Block by Richard Wilson

All is not as it seems – Square the Block by Richard Wilson

Head to the junction of Kingsway and Sardinia Street. Look up! Sue Donnelly introduces Square the Block by Richard Wilson.

If you walk down Kingsway from Holborn Station to the Aldwych you may be slightly taken aback when you glance at the corner of the New Academic Building facing Sardinia Street and Kingsway. While the top of the building looks solid […]

  • Professor Saul Estrin with HRH Queen Elizabeth as she meets with students at the opening of the LSE New Academic Building (NAB) in Lincoln's Inn Fields on the 5th November 2008
    Permalink Professor Saul Estrin with HRH Queen Elizabeth as she meets with students at the opening of the LSE New Academic Building (NAB) in Lincoln's Inn Fields on the 5th November 2008Gallery

    The Department of Management at LSE – reflections on the first decade

The Department of Management at LSE – reflections on the first decade

 

Founding head Professor Saul Estrin looks back the first ten years of the Department of Management at LSE.

In the early 2000s, LSE had long been providing excellent management education but in a fragmented way. Guided by then Director Sir Howard Davies, four former departments, henceforth Groups, were merged into the new Department of Management in June 2005. I was […]

William Threipland Baxter – a tribute to his teaching

Seventy years ago, in 1947, William Thriepland Baxter became the first full time Professor of Accounting in Britain. Michael Bromwich and Richard Macve consider themselves fortunate to have been his students, and later his colleagues, at LSE.

William (Will) Threipland Baxter was born on 27 July 1906 in Grimsby and died on 8 June 2006 in London. He qualified as a member […]

  • Permalink Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee by Walter Stoneman, bromide print, 1930. Courtesy of NPGGallery

    A Man for All Seasons – the Life and Times of Clement Attlee

A Man for All Seasons – the Life and Times of Clement Attlee

LSE lecturer, First World War veteran and later Prime Minister of Britain, Clement Attlee’s achievements have often been overlooked.  Professor John Bew and Professor Michael Cox re-investigate the life and times of Clement Attlee.

The gallons of ink spilled on Winston Churchill – and the huge appetite for books about him – have created something of an imbalance in our understanding of twentieth-century […]

Women in art – the Shaw Library

This Women’s History Month, LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly takes a trip to the Shaw Library to find out more about some of the women who created or feature in LSE art works. The Shaw Library (once known as the Founders’ Room) opened in 1928 and today its art works represent significant figures in the history of the School.

Beatrice and Sidney Webb […]

  • Vera Jack Holme
    Permalink Vera Jack HolmeGallery

    Vera ‘Jack’ Holme – one of the stars of the Women’s Library Collection

Vera ‘Jack’ Holme – one of the stars of the Women’s Library Collection

The LSE Women: making history Library series highlights women’s stories from some of the archives and special collections held at LSE Library. Curator Gillian Murphy shares the story of one of her favourite archives in the Women’s Library collection: that of Vera ‘Jack’ Holme.  She was a militant suffragette, chauffeur to the Pankhursts, cross-dressing actress and aid worker. This post uses photographs from […]