light-and-shadow-1118293-3Image Credit: (SIXTY CCO)

What were you reading in 2016 on LSE Review of Books? In Part One of our review of the year, we count down the most popular reviews on the LSE RB blog, beginning with 12-7.

Want to see the top six, including the most read of 2016? 


Global Inequality Cover12. Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization. Branko Milanovic. Harvard University Press. 2016.

Branko Milanovic offers a new account of the dynamics that are driving inequality on a global scale. Duncan Green praised this brilliant and thought-provoking book for its political curiosity and insight and, more particularly, for its reflections on the possible trajectory of inequality in the twenty-first century.


a-survival-kit-cover11. A Survival Kit for Doctoral Students and Their Supervisors: Traveling the Landscape of Research. Lene Tanggaard and Charlotte Wegener. Sage. 2016.

Lene Tanggaard and Charlotte Wegener offer a hands-on guide for both students and supervisors that seeks to engage with the ‘actual and messy practices of doctoral training’. Contributing to an already dense field of literature on the research process, the book is at its most engaging and involving when it draws on personal anecdotes, case studies and email exchanges and risks reflecting on moments of failure as well as success, found Sroyon Mukherjee.


The Ways of the World10. The Ways of the World. David Harvey. Profile Books. 2016.

An intellectual journey through the work of David Harvey over the past five decades, compiling chapters and article excerpts from different periods in his career accompanied by retrospective commentary and insight from Harvey himself. Taken together, this collection serves as an excellent introduction to the theorist’s influential body of thought and makes a convincing call for readers to join the struggle for social justice, wrote Erica Frazier.


The Truth About Inflation cover9. The Truth About Inflation. Paul Donovan. Routledge. 2015.

Paul Donovan gives global investors of all abilities the tools to understand inflation and how they can protect their portfolios against its risks. The book challenges lingering myths and misperceptions surrounding inflation, helping readers to better grasp what it actually is and what it is not, wrote Alex Verkhivker.


Jimmy Carter and the Middle East8. Jimmy Carter and the Middle East: The Politics of Presidential Diplomacy. Daniel Strieff. Palgrave. 2015.

Daniel Strieff seeks to reappraise Jimmy Carter’s perceived role as a peacemaker in the Middle East during his presidency. Jeff Roquen particularly welcomed the volume’s engagement with the impact of the US media on public perceptions of the ‘Palestinian Question’.


country-of-first-boys7. The Country of First Boys. Amartya Sen. The Little Magazine and Oxford University Press. 2015.

Amartya Sen offers a collection of thirteen essays that could be read as a ‘best of’ set of his reflections on Indian society, economics, culture, policy and intellectual thought. Writing on Sen’s defence of the importance of reasoned argument and plurality, Rishita Nandagiri praised this clarion call against injustice for its accessibility, dry wit and engaging conversational style.

 

Print Friendly