Dr Ashleigh McFeeters obtained her PhD at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, in the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work. The doctoral research examines the role of the news media in peace-building in post-conflict societies with a focus on female ex-combatants. She is currently working as a research assistant on the Society for Research into Higher Education-funded project, ‘How Connected are Students to Campus Technologies and Official Learning Spaces?’, at Queen’s University. Her research interests include gendered terrorism, former combatant’s roles in conflict transformation, women and peace-building and the news media and peace/conflict. She tweets @Aisleagh.

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This work by LSE Review of Books is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales.