Emma Smith recently completed her PhD at the University of Stirling. This explored responses to harm associated with indoor sex work in Scotland, amongst sex workers and service providers. Other research interests include: gender, sexuality, violence against women, social justice, deviance, stigma and qualitative based research methods. She has an MA Honours in History and Sociology from the University of Glasgow, a PGDip in Social Research from Glasgow Caledonian University and an MSc in Applied Social Research from the University of Stirling.

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This work by LSE Review of Books is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales.