Ignas Kalpokas is a PhD student in Politics at the University of Nottingham, working on a dissertation on Baruch Spinoza, Jacques Lacan, and Carl Schmitt. He holds his Masters degree in Social and Political Critical Theory and Bachelors degree in Politics from Vytautas Magnus University (Lithuania). He has also worked on various educational projects and initiatives. Ignas’ research interests lie in the investigation of interrelated concepts of sovereignty, the state, and the political as well as the formation and maintenance of (national) identities. In addition, his research also involves history, literature, and international relations theory. His preferred theoretical framework is mostly Continental philosophy.

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    The Monthly Roundup: What Have You Been Reading in October 2015?

The Monthly Roundup: What Have You Been Reading in October 2015?

Image Credit: Autumn Conker (Ian Hindmarsh)
Most Read:

Waging War: A New Philosophical Introduction. 2nd Edition. Ian Clark. Oxford University Press. 2015.

Ian […]

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    Book Review: Waging War: A New Philosophical Introduction by Ian Clark

Book Review: Waging War: A New Philosophical Introduction by Ian Clark

The 2nd edition of Waging War: A New Philosophical Introduction offers a far-reaching engagement with both the practice of, […]

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    Book Review: Reading the Comments: Likers, Haters, and Manipulators at the Bottom of the Web

Book Review: Reading the Comments: Likers, Haters, and Manipulators at the Bottom of the Web

Despite their lowly reputation as a kind of dark collective unconscious of the Internet, the process of commenting and […]

Book Review: The Middle Ages

In Johannes Fried’s The Middle Ages, the author makes his case for an alternative interpretation of the medieval period as […]

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    Book Review: Community Engagement 2.0? Dialogues on the Future of the Civic in the Disrupted University edited by Scott L. Crabill and Dan Butin

Book Review: Community Engagement 2.0? Dialogues on the Future of the Civic in the Disrupted University edited by Scott L. Crabill and Dan Butin

This volume is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the contemporary challenges faced by universities still struggling to […]

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    Book Review: The Rule of Law: The Common Sense of Global Politics by Christopher May

Book Review: The Rule of Law: The Common Sense of Global Politics by Christopher May

Christopher May’s latest book explores the complexities of the rule of law – a well-used but perhaps less well understood […]

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    Book Review: Dynamics of Political Violence: A Process-Oriented Perspective on Radicalisation and the Escalation of Political Conflict, edited by Lorenzo Bosi et al.

Book Review: Dynamics of Political Violence: A Process-Oriented Perspective on Radicalisation and the Escalation of Political Conflict, edited by Lorenzo Bosi et al.

Dynamics of Political Violence examines how violence emerges and develops from episodes of contentious politics. Contributors consider a wide […]

Book Review: Dictatorship by Carl Schmitt

Now available in English for the first time, Dictatorship is Carl Schmitt’s most scholarly book and arguably a paradigm […]

Book Review: The Question of Conscience: Higher Education and Personal Responsibility by David Watson

Does a university education hold any value? How do universities determine what skills are relevant in today’s ever-changing world when […]

Book Review: Hitler’s Philosophers by Yvonne Sherratt

Hitler had a dream to rule the world, not only with the gun but also with his mind. He saw […]

Book Review: Rhetoric and the Writing of History, 400-1500 by Matthew Kempshall

Rhetoric and the Writing of History provides an analytical overview of the vast range of historiography which was produced in […]

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This work by LSE Review of Books is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales.