Nicole Shephard is a PhD candidate at the LSE Gender Institute, where her research conceptually explores how people become transnational subjects. The analysis engages with the notion of transnational social space, intersectional theory and the queering of methodologies. Her broader academic interests include gender, migration, social movements, online activism and research methods. She holds an MSc in International Development from Bristol University and a BA in Social Work and Social Policy with a minor in Social Anthropology from University of Fribourg (Switzerland). Her pre-academic professional background is in IT and Human Resources, where she has worked in application management and process management.

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    Reading List: 7 Must-Read Books about Art Ahead of the Turner Prize 2016

Reading List: 7 Must-Read Books about Art Ahead of the Turner Prize 2016

Image Credit: London Artist’s Studio (THOR CC BY 2.0)
Tonight, the evening of Monday 5 December 2016, sees the announcement […]

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    Book Review: Of Remixology: Ethics and Aesthetics after Remix by David J. Gunkel

Book Review: Of Remixology: Ethics and Aesthetics after Remix by David J. Gunkel

Is remix a revolutionary creative practice or an illegitimate stealing of other people’s work? In Of Remixology, David J. […]

Book Review: Migration and New Media: Transnational Families and Polymedia by Mirca Madianou and Daniel Miller

The way in which transnational families maintain long-distance relationships has been revolutionised by the emergence of new media such as […]

Reading List: 10 must-read books on women’s rights, history and achievements for International Women’s Day

8th March marks International Women’s Day: a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present […]

Book Review: The Becoming of Bodies: Girls, Images, Experience by Rebecca Coleman

The relationship between bodies and images has long occupied feminism, and this book offers an alternative framework for analysis. Thinking […]

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales
This work by LSE Review of Books is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales.