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    The new federalism: blockchain will decentralise big tech’s power on the internet

The new federalism: blockchain will decentralise big tech’s power on the internet

Even though tech giants are businesses, they’re virtual states akin to absolute monarchies, with millions of users as subjects, writes Federico Ast. This blog first appeared on the LSE Business Review and is reposted here with thanks.

For most of history, the only form of government that humanity had known was despotism. Pharaohs, tsars, emperors and kings enjoyed a centralised […]

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    House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”. An overview of the evidence, Part 1

House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”. An overview of the evidence, Part 1

Oscar Davies is a media lawyer who will start pupillage at One Brick Court in October 2019. In this blog, he provides a summary of some of the evidence that has been submitted to the House of Lords Communications Committee as part of its inquiry into online regulation. This post was first published on Inforrm, and is reproduced here […]

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    If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

Jacob Rowbottom is a Fellow of University College, Oxford and is the author of Media Law (2018). Following the recent call by The Times for a new statutory online regulator, he outlines the case for a possible system of meta-regulation and explains how this might work in the case of digital intermediaries.

The regulation of digital intermediaries has been an […]

Digital Dominance: an event report

Digital Dominance was described by its co-editor Damian Tambini as a ‘problem-definition’ book rather than a ‘solutions’ book, taking an interdisciplinary approach to questions such as the implications of the effect of tech giants’ market and social power on media pluralism, freedom of expression and electoral legitimacy.

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    How Digital Threats to Democracy were Tackled During Ireland’s Abortion Referendum

How Digital Threats to Democracy were Tackled During Ireland’s Abortion Referendum

Craig Dwyer is a digital campaigns and communications consultant. He is a co-founder of the Transparent Referendum Initiative (TRI), a civic initiative established to demonstrate the role and impact of online advertising during political campaigns. The work of the Initiative, and others, saw steps taken by Facebook, Google and the Irish Government towards addressing the issue. In this blog, […]

Fake news and critical literacy: new findings, new questions

The Commission on Fake News and the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills recently published a report on Fake news and critical literacy. LSE PhD researcher Gianfranco Polizzi summarises the key findings of the report and sets out his recommendations in response. 

If on the one hand it is difficult to define fake news – as to whether it implies, for instance, false […]

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    Data-driven discrimination – a new challenge for civil society

Data-driven discrimination – a new challenge for civil society

Jędrzej Niklas, Research Officer for the Justice, Equity and Technology (JET) Project, and
Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications, have recently published a new report on automated discrimination in data-driven systems. In this blog for the Media Policy Project, they highlight some of their main findings, explaining how algorithms discriminate and why this […]

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    The Bristol Cable – a model for sustainable local journalism?

The Bristol Cable – a model for sustainable local journalism?

The Bristol Cable has been cited by many as an example of a ‘best practice’ independent local news organisation. MSc student and Silverstone Scholar Anthony Graham-Dillon spoke to Cable reporter Matty Edwards about the Cable’s co-operative business model, drive for media diversity and literacy, and the challenges of producing public-interest journalism. Matty Edwards was a participant in the Media Literacy workshop hosted by the LSE Truth Trust and Technology Commission […]

Regulating the internet: intermediaries to perpetrators

Graham Smith, cyberlaw expert and Partner at Bird & Bird, wrote the following piece for his blog, Cyberleagle. It is reposted here with permission and thanks.  

Nearly twenty five years after the advent of the Web, and longer since the birth of the internet, we still hear demands that the internet should be regulated – for all the world as […]

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    The European Parliament’s Hearing on Cambridge Analytica and Facebook #1: ‘and in the blue corner…’

The European Parliament’s Hearing on Cambridge Analytica and Facebook #1: ‘and in the blue corner…’

In the first of three blogs for the Media Policy Project, Brussels-based policy analyst Pascal Crowe reports from the European Parliament on the first of three scheduled hearings about the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica case. 

2018 has been an annus horribilis for tech in general, and Facebook in particular. The scandal surrounding Cambridge Analytica, Facebook and the UK referendum about whether or not to […]