Children and the Media

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    The content and context of screen use is more important than the amount of screen time

The content and context of screen use is more important than the amount of screen time

Following a workshop organised by the Media Policy Project about families and ‘screen time’, Mark Griffiths, a Professor of Behavioural Addiction at Nottingham Trent University, explores this concept in the context of his research into online gaming, arguing that amount of time children spend looking at screens is less important than the content and context of screen use. This blog coincides […]

An international approach to the protection of minors

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Families and “screen-time”: challenges of media self-regulation’, Madeleine de Cock Buning – Chair of the European Regulators Group for Audiovisual Media Services (ERGA), President of the Dutch Media Authority and Professor of Media, Communication & Copyright Law at Utrecht University in the Netherlands – reflects on proposals by […]

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    ‘Screen time’ advice for a new generation of ‘digital’ parents

‘Screen time’ advice for a new generation of ‘digital’ parents

Following the recent publication by the Media Policy Project of their policy brief about families and ‘screen time’, LSE’s Alicia Blum-Ross and Sonia Livingstone here reflect on some of the findings of their recent research, arguing that rather than chastising parents for allowing their children to spend too much time looking at screens, we should find ways to harness the benefits of digital […]

The future of children’s media: a view from the BBC

Alice Webb, Director of BBC Children’s and BBC North, explores some of the challenges facing the BBC as it considers how to deliver exciting and diverse content for children whilst adapting to technological advances. This blog coincides with the publication of a new Media Policy Project policy brief about families and ‘screen time’, authored by LSE’s Alicia Blum-Ross and Sonia Livingstone.

Anyone who works […]

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    What and how should parents be advised about ‘screen time’?

What and how should parents be advised about ‘screen time’?

Alicia Blum-Ross and Sonia Livingstone, from the LSE Department of Media and Communications and the Preparing for a Digital Future research project, explore current attitudes and advice to parents in relation to children and ‘screen time’ and asks whether it is still fit for purpose in today’s world. This blog coincides with a new Media Policy Project policy brief on the subject, authored by Alicia Blum-Ross […]

Is the BBC safe in Ofcom’s hands?

Ofcom may soon regulate the BBC, yet we know it already struggles to treat the public as citizens and not just consumers. Peter Lunt, Professor of Media and Communication at the University of Leicester, and Sonia Livingstone, Professor in the Media Department at the LSE, set out some of the key challenges.

The recently-published White Paper, A BBC for the future: […]

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    At last – recognition of the importance of the digital environment for children’s rights

At last – recognition of the importance of the digital environment for children’s rights

Following the adoption of the Strategy for the Rights of the Child by the Council of Europe, LSE’s Sonia Livingstone outlines the impact that the Strategy will have on children’s online rights and argues that there is a need for considerable public debate to address the challenges of policy coordination for the 47 member states involved.

What rights do children have online? […]

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    EU General Data Protection Regulation Article 8: Has Anyone Consulted the Kids?

EU General Data Protection Regulation Article 8: Has Anyone Consulted the Kids?

Joseph Savirimuthu, Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Liverpool, argues that the revised EU General Data Protection Regulation, announced in December 2015, has been poorly thought through and, by preventing children from consenting to the use of their data on social networking sites, does not take the rights of children into account.

‘Europe Could Kick Majority of Teens Off […]

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    A grown-up conversation about children and porn online starts here

A grown-up conversation about children and porn online starts here

Victoria Nash, Deputy Director and Policy and Research Fellow, University of Oxford; Cicely Marston, Senior Lecturer in Social Science, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Joanna R Adler, Professor of Forensic Psychology, Middlesex University, and Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology, London School of Economics and Political Science, say there is a need for better conversations around children and their […]

No more social networking for young teens?

Following the announcement that the EU has finally agreed updated data protection legislation after four years of protracted discussions, Professor Sonia Livingstone discusses the impact the legislation will have on children and, in particular, on how children interact with social networking platforms.

It’s been an extraordinary week for policy and research folk concerned about teenage social networking.

On 10 December, John Carr, […]