Data Protection

Brexit and the Future of Data Protection

In the aftermath of last week’s EU referendum, Anya Proops QC explores the implications of Brexit for the implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation, due to take effect by 25 May 2018.

So a week on from the Brexit referendum and it is clear that that there is no clear, carefully thought out strategy for extricating ourselves from the […]

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    ICANN’s WHOIS System Must Follow Local Laws and Best Practices in Data Protection

ICANN’s WHOIS System Must Follow Local Laws and Best Practices in Data Protection

The Internet operates in a space far removed from Westphalian sovereignty, where mostly self-regulated private entities set policy through network architecture and engineering decisions. Among these bodies, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a California-based not-for-profit, holds a monopoly over the technical and functional workings of the Internet’s domain name and numbering systems. It is also […]

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    Data protection through the lens of competition law: will Germany lead the way?

Data protection through the lens of competition law: will Germany lead the way?

On 2 March 2016, the Bundeskartellamt, the German competition authority, announced its decision to initiate proceedings against Facebook on suspicion that the social network provider had abused its dominant position by infringing data protection rules. Inge Graef and Brendan Van Alsenoy, Legal Researchers at the KU Leuven Centre for IT and IP Law, argue that the case represents the […]

Data Protection at the Schengen borders after Paris

Diana Dimitrova of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law discusses the proposed amendment from December 2015 to the Schengen Borders Code (SBC), tabled in response to the Paris attacks that took place in November 2015. In this post, she examines some of the privacy and data protection issues that arise from the provisions of the proposal.

The Schengen […]

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    The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

Following the release earlier this week of the final draft General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Daphne Keller, Director of Intermediary Liability at the Center for Law and Society at Stanford Law School, provides her response. This builds on her previous analysis about the GDPR and its consequences for Internet intermediaries and user speech online.

The probably-really-almost-totally final 2016 General Data Protection […]

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    Measuring Human Rights in the ICT Sector: Why, How, and with What Impact?

Measuring Human Rights in the ICT Sector: Why, How, and with What Impact?

On 3 November 2015, Ranking Digital Rights published its inaugural report examining corporate practices around freedom of expression and privacy. The LSE Media Policy Project presents a round-up of perspectives on the RDR’s Corporate Accountability Index. A panel discussion on The Business of Human Rights: Measuring Transparency in the ICT Sector will take place on 19 November at the LSE’s Thai Theatre.

ARTICLE 19 | Institute for […]

Holding the “sovereigns of cyberspace” accountable

Rebecca MacKinnon is the Director of the Ranking Digital Rights Project. In this post, she explains the background to the project, and how the findings will hopefully lead to more research into digital rights in freedom of expression and privacy. A panel discussion on the topic will take place on 19 November, at LSE’s Thai Theatre.

In 2014, more than […]

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    Negotiating the Data Protection Thicket: Life in the Aftermath of Schrems

Negotiating the Data Protection Thicket: Life in the Aftermath of Schrems

Last week, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) declared that the Safe Harbour agreement which allowed the movement of digital data between the EU and the US was invalid. The Court was ruling in a case brought by Max Schrems, an Austrian student and privacy campaigner who, in the wake of the Snowden revelations of mass […]

(Un)Safe Harbour: Stop! Or the Court of Justice will shoot

In the following post, Diana Dimitrova of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law, discusses the implications of the Court of Justice of the European Union’s (ECJ) ruling that the Safe Harbour scheme is invalid, and looks at the powers of national supervisory authorities in ensuring compliance with the rights to privacy and data protection.

About the case

In […]

Safe Harbour: Key Aspects of the ECJ Ruling

Today, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) declared that the Safe Harbour agreement which allowed the movement of digital data between the EU and the US was invalid. The Court was ruling in a case brought by Max Schrems, an Austrian student and privacy campaigner who, in the wake of the Snowden revelations of mass surveillance, […]