Data Protection

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    The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

Following the release earlier this week of the final draft General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Daphne Keller, Director of Intermediary Liability at the Center for Law and Society at Stanford Law School, provides her response. This builds on her previous analysis about the GDPR and its consequences for Internet intermediaries and user speech online.

The probably-really-almost-totally final 2016 General Data Protection […]

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    Measuring Human Rights in the ICT Sector: Why, How, and with What Impact?

Measuring Human Rights in the ICT Sector: Why, How, and with What Impact?

On 3 November 2015, Ranking Digital Rights published its inaugural report examining corporate practices around freedom of expression and privacy. The LSE Media Policy Project presents a round-up of perspectives on the RDR’s Corporate Accountability Index. A panel discussion on The Business of Human Rights: Measuring Transparency in the ICT Sector will take place on 19 November at the LSE’s Thai Theatre.

ARTICLE 19 | Institute for […]

Holding the “sovereigns of cyberspace” accountable

Rebecca MacKinnon is the Director of the Ranking Digital Rights Project. In this post, she explains the background to the project, and how the findings will hopefully lead to more research into digital rights in freedom of expression and privacy. A panel discussion on the topic will take place on 19 November, at LSE’s Thai Theatre.

In 2014, more than […]

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    Negotiating the Data Protection Thicket: Life in the Aftermath of Schrems

Negotiating the Data Protection Thicket: Life in the Aftermath of Schrems

Last week, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) declared that the Safe Harbour agreement which allowed the movement of digital data between the EU and the US was invalid. The Court was ruling in a case brought by Max Schrems, an Austrian student and privacy campaigner who, in the wake of the Snowden revelations of mass […]

(Un)Safe Harbour: Stop! Or the Court of Justice will shoot

In the following post, Diana Dimitrova of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law, discusses the implications of the Court of Justice of the European Union’s (ECJ) ruling that the Safe Harbour scheme is invalid, and looks at the powers of national supervisory authorities in ensuring compliance with the rights to privacy and data protection.

About the case

In […]

Safe Harbour: Key Aspects of the ECJ Ruling

Today, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) declared that the Safe Harbour agreement which allowed the movement of digital data between the EU and the US was invalid. The Court was ruling in a case brought by Max Schrems, an Austrian student and privacy campaigner who, in the wake of the Snowden revelations of mass surveillance, […]

Wikileaks revisited: Is Julian Assange a straw man?

Two interesting recent publications on Wikileaks by US law professors. Alasdair Roberts says that the contribution of the Wikileaks phenomenon to transparency has been hugely over-exaggerated, and Yochai Benkler who says more or less the opposite. What can we say about these two early attempts to understand the significance of Wikileaks? Benkler is concerned with directly intervening in a debate […]