Digital Inequalities

The regulatory future of algorithms

Although they are often used to automate or streamline processes, algorithms are far from being the objective tool that many make them out to be. In this post, Jędrzej Niklas from the LSE looks at the negative effects of algorithms and how policy attempts (or will attempt) to mitigate those effects.

Automated decisions systems are becoming more and more common. […]

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    Digital Inequality: Disadvantaged Young People Experience Higher Barriers to Digital Engagement

Digital Inequality: Disadvantaged Young People Experience Higher Barriers to Digital Engagement

Britain is rapidly digitising, increasing opportunities across a wide range of areas in our everyday lives, from interacting, to being informed and to undertaking transactions more rapidly and at lower cost. Yet, both academic and policy research show that the benefits achieved from digital engagement are not distributed equally. Dr. Ellen Helsper, an expert on digital inequality and Associate […]

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    Corbyn’s digital meh-nifesto is too rooted in the past to offer much for the future

Corbyn’s digital meh-nifesto is too rooted in the past to offer much for the future

Paul Bernal is a Lecturer in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and Media Law in the University of East Anglia School of Law. Here he raises questions about the implications of Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s new Digital democracy manifesto. 
While the Labour Party recently launched their Digital Democracy Manifesto with as much fanfare as they could muster, the reaction to it could […]

The Economics of Privacy

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Alessandro Acquisti, Professor of Information Technology and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, asks what the economic argument is for and against privacy. 

It may sound surprising that a review of economics and privacy can be provocative, but it actually is: some of the findings […]

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    Digital inequalities in the aisles: the quantified individual

Digital inequalities in the aisles: the quantified individual

Joseph Turow, Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, explores the increasingly important role of data collection and the quantification of the individual in one of our favourite activities – shopping. This post follows a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’.

One of the consequences of 20th century modernism has been the rise […]

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    Algorithmic Fairness: From social good to a mathematical framework

Algorithmic Fairness: From social good to a mathematical framework

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Suresh Venkatasubramanian, Associate Professor at the School of Computing, University of Utah, here outlines the case for interrogating the inner workings of algorithms. A summary of the workshop will be available on this website shortly.

The algorithm is out of the box. Decision-by-algorithm is no […]

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    Automation, Correlation and Causation: Launching a Policy Discussion

Automation, Correlation and Causation: Launching a Policy Discussion

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Tal Zarsky, Professor of Law at the University of Haifa, discusses some of the regulatory and policy implications that arise from companies’ use of personal data, with particular reference to wearable technologies. 

Technological developments, as well as the rise of new business environments and […]

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    Predictive Policing and the Automated Suppression of Dissent

Predictive Policing and the Automated Suppression of Dissent

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Lina Dencik, Lecturer in the School of Media, Journalism and Cultural Studies at the University of Cardiff, reflects on some of the implications of using large data-sets for policing purposes. 

The collection and analysis of large data-sets for the purposes of policing forms part […]

Digital Exclusion and the Robot Revolution

Following a special workshop convened by the Media Policy Project on ‘Automation, Prediction and Digital Inequalities’, Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Acting Director of the LSE Media Policy Project, connects current concerns about automated, predictive technologies with the goals of digital inclusion, arguing that broadband adoption policies and programmes need to better prepare members of marginalised communities for a new era […]