EU Media Policy

Data Protection at the Schengen borders after Paris

Diana Dimitrova of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law discusses the proposed amendment from December 2015 to the Schengen Borders Code (SBC), tabled in response to the Paris attacks that took place in November 2015. In this post, she examines some of the privacy and data protection issues that arise from the provisions of the proposal.

The Schengen […]

Take 2: Personal data and dynamic IPs – time for clarity?

Damian Clifford and Jessica Schroers, legal researchers at KU Leuven, look at whether dynamic IP addresses fall within the scope of European Data Protection legislation given the identifiability of users based on the processing of IP addresses. In this post, they examine the written submissions and the hearing of the the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) which provide […]

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    EU General Data Protection Regulation Article 8: Has Anyone Consulted the Kids?

EU General Data Protection Regulation Article 8: Has Anyone Consulted the Kids?

Joseph Savirimuthu, Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Liverpool, argues that the revised EU General Data Protection Regulation, announced in December 2015, has been poorly thought through and, by preventing children from consenting to the use of their data on social networking sites, does not take the rights of children into account.

‘Europe Could Kick Majority of Teens Off […]

Delfi revisited: the MTE-Index.hu v. Hungary case

On 2 February 2016, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) delivered a judgement on Magyar Tartalomszolgáltatók Egyesülete and Index.hu Zrt v. Hungary (MTE and Index.hu). The case concerned the liability of online intermediaries for user comments. Using the criteria established in the Delfi AS case of 16 June 2015, the Court found that there had been a violation […]

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    The European Court of Human Rights rules again on liability for third party comments

The European Court of Human Rights rules again on liability for third party comments

In a recent ruling, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) ruled that the Hungarian online news portal Index.hu cannot be held responsible for offensive or vulgar comments posted by its readers. The Court held that placing strict liability on news portals for such comments is a violation of Article 10 (Freedom of Expression) of the European Convention on Human […]

Poland: The Public, The Government And The Media

Beata Klimkiewicz, Associate Professor at the Institute of Journalism, Media and Social Communication, examines recent changes to public service media law in Poland and argues that whilst reform of Polish public service media is needed, this should be achieved not through direct political means, but rather through greater public involvement.

The political battle about public service media (PSM) is not new in Poland, what is new […]

No more social networking for young teens?

Following the announcement that the EU has finally agreed updated data protection legislation after four years of protracted discussions, Professor Sonia Livingstone discusses the impact the legislation will have on children and, in particular, on how children interact with social networking platforms.

It’s been an extraordinary week for policy and research folk concerned about teenage social networking.

On 10 December, John Carr, […]

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    The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

The final draft of Europe’s “right to be forgotten” law

Following the release earlier this week of the final draft General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Daphne Keller, Director of Intermediary Liability at the Center for Law and Society at Stanford Law School, provides her response. This builds on her previous analysis about the GDPR and its consequences for Internet intermediaries and user speech online.

The probably-really-almost-totally final 2016 General Data Protection […]

Not Neutrality but ‘Open Internet’ à l’Européenne

On 27 October, the European Parliament approved a new regulation which will abolish roaming charges across the EU. However, in the same regulation, there was also discussion of the more technical question of net neutrality, a thorny issue which centres on the principle of equal treatment for all web traffic.  In this piece, Chris Marsden, Professor of Internet and […]

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    EU drops the net neutrality principle – will it mean content restrictions?

EU drops the net neutrality principle – will it mean content restrictions?

Monica Horten is a European expert on internet policy and Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics & Political Science. Here, she explains how the new EU regulation on telecoms may be good news for travellers with mobile phones, but argues that pressing issues remain on the future of net neutrality in Europe.

A new EU telecoms law adopted on […]